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I flush mounted two bench mounts; one on each of my benches. Just used a router to flush mount them. This way nothing catches on them moving things around the bench. Then got top plates for ALL of my equipment LOL. Vices, trimmer, cutoff saws, Dremel mini drill press, etc. Love my Inline Fab mounts; a little pricey but makes life so easy.

I load with a rock Chucker for all my pistol ammo and a Co-Ax for most of the rifle ammo. I converted the Rock Chucker to use Hornady Lock N Load bushing. Save a bunch of time setting up and makes switching from sizing to seating etc a couple of seconds task. Same with caliber change overs. I've thought about lights but just haven't quite gotten around to them yet. How do you like them?
All of their products are very nice set ups. It’s an amazingly simple design and Dan is a great guy to deal with (his shop is in Oregon. :cool:
The lights are a tad bright for me, I like being able to see powder in the case more easily. I shield them with a small piece of poster board and tape when I’m loading to take away the brightness.
 

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My disadvantage with my new setup is that my shop is a separate building which, though air conditioned, is not kept cool except when in use, so powders and primers are not stored there.
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When I decided to build my 10’x12’ reloading/gun room in my shop the first major decision was to insulate it to the HILT. I framed the walls with 2 x 6 and
2 x 8 in the ceiling, used spray foam in every joint and electrical insertion then I stuffed as much Eco Bat insulation (commercial stuff) in the wall cavities. It stays between 60-64° in the summer with no AC and between 54-58° in the winter with a small heater on a timer to run one hour twice per 24 hour period.
I store all my powders, primers in there in wooden boxes.
If I could restart this project I would change only one thing, the size, I’d built it BIGGER...:p:p:p
 

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Here's mine complete with idiot Red Cattle dog who feels it's his duty to be a serial pest when I'm in the room reloading.

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The only sad thing I see in your work space brother is the electrical outlet.. It looks like it’s weeping...:p:D:p:D
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I figure if I can find things it is set up properly. Love the mutt too.;)
 
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When I decided to build my 10’x12’ reloading/gun room in my shop the first major decision was to insulate it to the HILT. I framed the walls with 2 x 6 and
2 x 8 in the ceiling, used spray foam in every joint and electrical insertion then I stuffed as much Eco Bat insulation (commercial stuff) in the wall cavities. It stays between 60-64° in the summer with no AC and between 54-58° in the winter with a small heater on a timer to run one hour twice per 24 hour period.
I store all my powders, primers in there in wooden boxes.
If I could restart this project I would change only one thing, the size, I’d built it BIGGER...:p:p:p
I am considering adding insulation this spring, but it was too much to add on when we had just moved in this summer and I had more projects than I could keep up with for a couple of months.
 

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The only sad thing I see in your work space brother is the electrical outlet.. It looks like it’s weeping...:p:D:p:D
View attachment 226596

I figure if I can find things it is set up properly. Love the mutt too.;)
In the not too distant future it will have a fridge plugged into it to plug that sad look. Man's gotta stay hydrated.
The faithful flea bag loves all the attention he can get as does the son's pig dog.
 

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In the not too distant future it will have a fridge plugged into it to plug that sad look. Man's gotta stay hydrated.
The faithful flea bag loves all the attention he can get as does the son's pig dog.
Yes indeed, I have a full sized fridge/freezer in my shop because hydration is life.;)
Love our fur babies too, they make life worth living.:D

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Well the reloading/gunroom is slowly getting better, I've been acquiring more inlinefabrication products to make things easier for myself.. These storage brackets are the shizzle.:D

Pics to follow.;)

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Mine is still rather pristine. So far I have the basic bench built, 78" wide by 34" deep with an inset lower shelf. I have the Lee Classic Turret press mounted to it using the Lee quick change plate system (works very well, I think). Still need to add a hutch/shelves on top, but it's at least usable at this point. The downside is that my reloading room is in my basement. It's cold, damp and no insulation, plus the door that leads up to the back porch is there and is not even close to being "sealed". I live in an old farm house (built in 1900). From an "energy efficiency" perspective, this place would probably make some green energy weenie's head spin.

I have a small 3500 watt ceramic heater that blows hot air. Just yesterday, I put it down there and ran it for 2 hours and 15 minutes and it only raised the temp by 2 degrees, so that's not going to work unless I want $300 electric bills. On the good side, it's not nearly as cold as outside. It's been pretty steady in the lower 20's here and the room is running around 40 degrees. I like colder temps, so with a light jacket, it's no issue for me to sit down there...but powder, primers, and loaded ammo will NOT be living there.
 

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The downside is that my reloading room is in my basement. It's cold, damp and no insulation,
How much area do you need as your reloading space?
Temporarily you can build some walls out of 2 X 2 lumber to create that space and wrap it in plastic.
A couple of hinges and you can make a door in and out of it.
That little heater will work wonders if you partition the basement and create a small work area.
 

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It's a small room already..my basement isn't wide open. Barn stone walls all the way around with the drafty door leading up to the porch (which is inclosed). Another door leading out to the rest of the basement. I haven't measured it, but I'm guessing 8-10 feet wide and 15 feet long. My water softener and fuse boxes are there as well.

Not too worried with it this winter, but I'll throw up some 2x4 walls with insulation this summer and probably permanently plug that door to the porch, it's not used anyway.
 

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Well that's not too large. The biggest problem is the basement floor. Concrete tends to stay at ground temperature unless you heat the space 24/7.
But since your fuse box is there (must be old) maybe you can run a circuit for a bit larger heater....maybe even baseboard heat along one wall.
No sparks, just even heat.
 

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Yeah, it's old...built in 1900. I don't even have floor joists, it's logs, most still have bark on them.

Yes, definitely do not want any sparks or open flames at all!

I've kicked around an idea, but I think it'll be more expensive and more work than what it's worth. I have a pretty large barn, 10,000-12,000 sq, feet. Lots of sectioned off rooms, 9 horse stalls on one end and a garage of sorts on the other where I keep my tractor and race boat. The original owners had horses and also ran an antiques business out of the barn, hence all the storage room areas. There is a 2 bedroom apartment up in the back that is no longer in use. I thought about pulling the air handler and gas heater and install it in the main part of the basement. but then I'd have to install ducting, electrical, vent the heater, etc, etc. It's sat unused for the last 12 years, so not even sure it would even run anymore.

Some sort of 220v heater is easily doable, if I can find one that'll output enough heat to get the room up to temp semi-quickly. I'd rather not have to leave it on 24/7 or even occasionally with a thermostat. That would get expensive quick. A small gas furnace type heater like what you find in a mobile home would probably work good and gas is cheaper to run than electricity, but I'd have to make sure it was off (including pilot light) when I have powder down there. Mounting it outside the room in another part of the basement would mean heating the entire basement as those kind need to be on a wall where it can be vented and would put it a long way from the reloading room.

I'll get some walls up and get it insulated then go from there. That small electric heater I have might stand a chance if it's insulated.
 

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I’d be more worried about the damp then the cold. Reloading equipment doesn’t do dampness very well. My room is in my attic where it’s very dry . I add moisture in the winter to avoid static sparks.
 

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Yeah, that's definitely a concern, but I think I'm going to get a small dehumidifier specifically for the room. I have a bigger one that we run in the main part of the basement and it does pretty good at keeping humidity in control, at least in that area. Usually run it only in the summer months though as the air gets pretty dry in winter...until we get the snow going and the ground gets wet and seeps in.

I'm still going to get some walls up with insulation, block off that door leading up to the porch, that's the main culprit for letting cold and damp in. I've also thought of building a raised, insulated floor too, just to get that cold concrete covered.

I'm still chasing some small leaks at the bottom corner of the concrete stairs that lead down to that door. If we get some good heavy rains for a few days, it'll leak a small puddle under that door. I thought I had it sealed up, but I need to get my air chisel in there and actually open the hair line crack up so I can put the sealant into it. The thin layer that I can manage to cover the tiny crack with just gets blown through....water is heavy and there's a lot of pressure 8 feet under ground.
 

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Thats a lot of hammers for reloading. LOL
Curious, that light LED or florescent?
Those cases look good the way you have them stacked in the drawers. Giving me ideas :)
 
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