Reloading and components

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Mouser, Jul 25, 2013.

  1. Mouser

    Mouser Active Member

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    I have bought and read Hornady's reloading manuals 2x...I will get in to reloading at some point in time in the near future but have not pulled the trigger yet...no pun intended.

    From a needs vs wants.. I will start off loading 9mm and 38 special and eventually move to 45 acp and 40 S&W....later beyond, but starting with those 4 loads how many types of primers do I need to load those? If I want to minimize components at first what is the best all around powder/primer combination to give me the best performance early on...later, I am sure I would expand my selections but simplicity is probably better to begin with ... at least for me!
     
  2. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    You will only need Small Pistol Primers for those calibers. You can use Magnum Small Pistol Primers if that's all you can find, but load the loads slinky lighter. But they all use the same type of primer.

    I happen to know that for powder, Bullseye works very well for 9mm, .38 Special, and .40 S&W. I'm assuming it does for .45 although I've never reloaded for that caliber. But I have for the other three, and Bullseye is a great powder, gives accurate loads, and you don't have to use too much powder which makes it economical. It is burns a little cleaner than Silhouette, for example (with lead bullets).

    Also, if you're trying to really save components, I use the same bullets for .38 and 9mm. I bought them for 9mm and it turns out they work fine for .38 Special as well, so now I double tap. Bear in mind if you use different components as me YMMV. Here's what I use:

    http://shop.snscasting.com/9MM-125-GR-RN-9mm-125RN.htm
     

  3. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    Actually I'm not positive about primers for .45 ACP. I've heard some cases use small pistol primers and some use large pistol primers? I could be wrong.


    9mm, .38 Special, and .40 S&W definitely all use SPPs.
     
  4. Mouser

    Mouser Active Member

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    Thanks...I used to use Bullseye Red Dot for Trap/skeet loads and have a little still around...I was thinking that the powder would be a good all-around choice. TY
     
  5. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    9mm, 38 and 40 take Small pistol primers. The 45 acp originally was strictly Large Pistol, but in the past few years there have been some ammo manufacturers using small pistol primers in their 45 acp ammo.

    Well, that depends on what you mean by "best performance" and what you want to do with these loads.
    Are you talking soft shooting target/plinking loads, or are to talking high performance, high velocity SD or Bowling pin ammo?

    It also depends on how you are going to load this ammo. Are you going to be loading single stage and weighing each powder charge or are you going to load on a progressive press. If progressive I would recommend you start out with one of the easy metering ball/spherical powders from Ramshot/Accurate.

    For soft shooting, clean burning, accurate plinking ammo it's tough to beat WST.

    For High performance, high velocity, easy metering it's tough to beat Ramshot True Blue and Silhouette.
     
  6. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    No problem. Welcome to the addiction!
     
  7. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    That clears it up for me too. Thanks.
     
  8. Mouser

    Mouser Active Member

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    I don't shoot competitively and probably wont...I would think plinking would be the vast majority of my loading...I have always liked tinkering with my hobbies, and thus have few hobbies but I get into them deeply hence reloading is the natural progression. I think I will wind up getting a single stage press like a Lee Turret style as I am not trying to grind out 300 rounds per hour....just having a little fun with my hobby...I have a bunch of brass just waiting for primers, powder and bullets!
     
  9. bildee

    bildee New Member

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    if you can find ANY kind of primers right now, you will be doing just great. Powder availability is not good, either, and prices are ridiculous. I"m just not gonna shoot, except laserlight, airsoft and dryfire, until prices get back within 20% of what they were last October. If that's next year yet, so what?
     
  10. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    There are three basic types of presses.
    The single stage, one hole, one die at a time. Very slow when loading pistol ammo that requires 3-4 different dies to complete a round.

    The Turret, Multiple holes, mulitple dies mounted on a rotating head. This can be used as a single stage, or as a semi-progressive. Because the head rotates and not the base only one operation can be done with a pull of the handle. Pretty fast.

    The Progressive, multiple holes, multiple dies mounted on a stationary head, the base or shell holder rotates. Because the base rotates, Each pull of the handle completes all of the desired steps. Very fast and very complex.

    The Lee Turret press is an excellent choice and gives you the best of both single stage and progressive.
     
  11. bildee

    bildee New Member

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    the lee progressive, the rifle capable one, can be used as a single station, is very low cost on Ebay (especially right after xmas) and is quite simple to use. 700 rds per hour, 1000 rds per hour if you get the optional bullet feeder. either get Lee single station, Lee scales, and dies, or get USED lyman, RCBS, etc, or you're going to lose your butt on single station gear. The "good stuff", retail, costs as much as the Lee progressive, but only loads 150 rds per hour. Your time is worth a lot more than that, and in fact, you can quickly pay for the lee by laoding for your buddies. right now, tho, components and gear are almost non-available.
     
  12. gschnarr

    gschnarr New Member

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    Another powder you might want to look at is 231 or HP38. I use it for the 38, 9mm, 9mak,44 special, 45acp and 380. I would be very careful about making reloads for friends and especially selling them any. To be in the business of manufacturing ammo, you need a federal firearms manufactures license. Until you become proficient and very good at reloading, even giving your reloads to friends, make you liable for any problems your ammo may cause.

    Start reloading for yourself and for the feeling of accomplishment where you are making better and cheaper ammo then you can buy. For me, it is also relaxing in that you need to concentrate on the reloading and only the reloading. I have only been reloading since the early 70s and have found it an enjoyable hobby. Remember be safe and careful.