Reloading... an engineers nightmare

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by partdeux, Dec 27, 2018.

  1. Hookeye

    Hookeye Well-Known Member

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    Used to reload in my basement when my kids in diapers.
    Had big bench, radio...........found the exercise relaxing.
    Shot weekly back then. Was not costly.

    Things sure have changed.
     
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  2. Humpy

    Humpy Member

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    yes especially in rifle cases going below published data can give you pressure spikes. That wasn't the problem with the 357 load. Load was right out of the manual. Propellant was new as well.
    The load with Blue Dot was right out of the book as well.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2019

  3. formerCav

    formerCav Well-Known Member

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    For a living, I had 4 careers: 1) soldier... job...kill people, 2) Machine operator...make parts for a variety of industries...aerospace...automotive...it was a "job shop"
    3) auto mechanic.... fix cars and fix peoples screw ups
    4) mechanical engineer, tool designer, manufacturing engineer. tooling for John Deere 4 wheel drive tractors to thin film computer heads to dust collector bag houses to medical catheter mold design and everything in between.
    With that said. I NEVER had a problem reloading with my old single station pacific / hornady 007 press that I started with, nor my Dillon 550 B.
    I've had minor issues when reloading but those are related to something coming loose (like the primer cup) or just getting dirty after 500 rounds being loaded.
    Never had a "kaboom" and been loading since 1979.
    I loaded "light loads" (1000 FPS in a 41 magnum using 2400 powder), or so called cowboy loads in 45 Colt...etc etc.
    I mostly load for .223 (esp when i was shooting matches), .308 for the matches, and 45 aCP as that is what I carry.
    I know about loading so the case is at least half full etc.
    with the rifle loads it is NOT and issue.
    I've found a good practice load for my 45 auto that is 5.7 grains of win 231, standard large pistol winchester primers, and precision delta brand 230 grain FMJ. 860 FPS according to the P35 chrono. Nice clover leaf groups offhand at 20 to 25 FEET and shooting relatively fast.
    Been loading up a 44 spec lately and it seems as though the ruger GP 100 likes the 240 grain JHP's but NOT 200 or 180 grainers. Using 2400 powder in them.
    Best advice, PAY attention, NO interuptions, do not "HOT DOG" it.
    Guns are cheap but eyes and fingers are irreplaceable!!
    Probably related to barrel twist rate.
    It does get attention at the range with the ball of fire coming out the end of the 5 inch barrel. I think most folks think it is a 44 magnum. Load with the 240's is about 950 FPS.
     
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  4. noylj

    noylj Member

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    Bullets today are NOT too soft. 10-13BHN will handle almost any handgun. With a gas check, it will handle almost any rifle.
    FIT is what is needed for lead bullets. For 9x19, I use 0.357-0.358" lead bullets in ALL my 9x19 guns. Get larger bullets if you have leading. To use up existing bullets that lead the barrel, do a VERY light tumble lube in LLA or 45/45/10.
    Yes, folks, years ago, 10-13 BHN was considered a HARD bullet and almost no one used straight linotype or such for bullets.
    Today, all the swaged bullets produced commercially are in the 10-13 BHN range, except for individuals using manual presses to make their own bullets.
     
  5. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Well-Known Member

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    Reloading is something that can be enjoyable or just plain boring as if you've got a couple of 100 rounds to do.
    Reloading can also provide some very "interesting" results as well especially when you accidently bump the beam scales and the load goes up 5gns or so and you don't notice till a bit later so you go back through probably 5-10 loaded rounds to check and find that there's probably 90% way overloaded.
    Soooo....................you pull things apart, reweigh the powder and put it all back together again thinking you've fixed everything up BUT then there's that mongrel Murphy sitting quietly in the corner sniggering away because he knows there's some real funny stuff going to happen like this................................ primer fell out after a bit of a battle trying to lift the bolt and then had to use a cleaning rod to tap the case out of the chamber.:eek:

    My 22/250AI loaded(well supposed to be) with 37gns of AR2208(Varget) behind a 60gn Sierra Varmint pill HP.
    Anybody who reckons they haven't stuffed up reloading is either walking a separate path to the truth OR hasn't done any or hasn't been doing it for long.

    overload.jpg
     
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  6. noylj

    noylj Member

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    Why I prefer digital scales.
     
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  7. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Well-Known Member

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    On the subject of digital scales my mate has a set and on our last feral relocation expedition he suddenly found that he had quite a few reloads of his(22/250) that were flattening primers and needed some help getting the bolt to lift and then had to use a cleaning rod to tap the cases out.
    I asked him if he was checking the loads after every 10 or so loads and he said he was and that as far as he knew the charger was throwing the right powder weights.
    I don't like digital scales for that fact alone and although slower than digital I prefer beam scales as every load is the same...........................well that is until you bump the scales.
     
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  8. formerCav

    formerCav Well-Known Member

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    kind of like being a carpenter.
    Measure TWICE cut ONCE!
    I look at the scale and I check frequently, certainly more then once.
    My scale has 10's of grains (10, 20, 30 etc) and then TENTHS that is .1, .2, etc, and then FULL grains 1, 2, 3, etc.
    It is easy to think mathematically that it is 10's ONES, Tenths, when it is the opposite!!
    Be VERY careful.
    Nice thing about rifle loads, is the it is almost always very close to a compressed load.
    45's and 44 mags you could easily triple charge if you are NOT careful.
     
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  9. noylj

    noylj Member

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    A beam balance can be moved very easily. A poise could jump into the wrong notch. Rust could make the readings incorrect. Paralax can have a significant effect.
    With a digital, you can rezero often and calibrate whenever you feel like it.
    Believe me, the problem of max loads and hard movement of the bolt has many causes besides incorrect charge weight.
    All through college I had to use analytical beam balances. Once, for very small weights, I had to use a very thin glass rod and measure the displacement due to the weight.
    As soon as I got a job in industry, I never saw a beam balance again.
    Bought my first digital scale back about 1975 or so (Ainsworth) and still have it.
    Have an RCBS ChargeMaster and was weighing 6.8 gns. Got called away and two days later, when I got back to reloading room, I still had a 6.8gn charge waiting for me. Took it off, recalibrated, and it was 6.8gn. I can't ask for more than that.
    All scales must be used properly.
     
  10. formerCav

    formerCav Well-Known Member

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    the scales I've seen that are digital jump around way too much. take you like 15 seconds to read a charge if not more.
    Of course, this was in the late 1990's. Maybe they have improved a lot since then.
     
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  11. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for all the info!:cool: I am glad to see others who like to get down to the 'science' of shooting.:) Most 'factory' bbls are manufactured with twist rates that will works with a wide range of bullet weights and velocities, so if you have the time and means to experiment , as your co-heart did, you can find the 'best' rate for a specific application.;)
    To answer your question. It would be my SWAG that Blue Dot, being a faster burning powder, would be loaded in much smaller quantities thus it would be much harder to get a more consistent load/weight (more a % of change from load to load), plus as C3 said, less of load density which would position the powder differently within the case from shot to shot and make for a different ignition and burn rate.:)
     
  12. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I use the Hornady electronic scale, not made by them, Ohaus, made in China, 'load cell' electronics.
    I really like it. Zero-out the scale with the powder pan in place, throw your charge and verify it's what you're after. I check every 5th charge, just to make sure no "gremlins" have gotten involved. Much, much better than my old RCBS beam scale.

    My thoughts often wander over toward a Dillon press, but they sure rape a customer on price, especially for the accessories.
     
  13. formerCav

    formerCav Well-Known Member

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    I've had my Dillon 550 B since about 1998. I used to shoot competitively in NRA highpower, 300 meter international match, and bowling pins with pistols, IPSC etc.
    Dillon had given me a NEW press with 3 of my old parts under their NO bu11chit warranty.
    I have no complaints.
    Yes, you will pay roughly 200 bucks for a COMPLETE caliber change, that is, the die sets, the powder measure station, the quick change caliber tooling plate etc.
    It is NICe to be able to change from say 308 to 38 special in 5 minutes or less.
    I've loaded over 100K rounds through it.
    I load for 38, 357, 44 spc, 44 mag, 41 mag, 45 auto, 223, 243, 308,6.5 x 284 and 6.5 grendel.
    got all the tool heads.
    I started and loaded my first 20 years on a Pacific/Hornady 007 press. Yes it worked, but it meant you were handling each peace of brass 5 times before you had a loaded cartridge.
    If you've ever loaded 1000 rounds to go shooting prairie dogs, (or 500 rounds per week for NRA highpower and practice) you will see and feel the difference between a single station and a progressive press!
     
  14. noylj

    noylj Member

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    And, I have never has a digital scale that did anything wrong, ever. I have had beam scales move when I went to lift the pan, wear into the fulcrum and not swing freely, and had to help someone clean his when he left on the shelf with beam on the fulcrum and managed to get it coated with spray oil and dirt and dust.
     
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