Reloading .22LR

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by PANDEMIC, Sep 24, 2020.

  1. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

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    So I have been giving it a lot of thought lately and I would like to learn how to reload. Specifically .22LR, since it does look easy (just a lot of work involved and its very time consuming.) But I wanna do it as a foundation of learning to reload and gain some experience. And at the same time, keep the equipment and gear I need as little and as less complex as possible. And also I don't want to go through hundreds of dollars on equipment or buy the type of equipment that take up a lot of space.

    So I saw this particular video on reloading .22LR:


    9:37 mark is when he starts reloading.

    Here are the 2 powders mentioned in the video:

    Black Powder:
    https://www.natchezss.com/hodgdon-pyrodex-p-pistol-powder-1-lbs.html

    Smokeless Powder:
    https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/item/00137150656/alliant-unique-smokeless-powder-1-lb

    The 8:10 mark is where he talks about the gun powder.

    I do have one question on the gun powder.
    Can I just use one of those or do I need both?

    And does anyone know which one is better or recommended for a beginner?


    Here is the .22LR Reloader Kit:

    https://sharpshooter-22lr-reloader.myshopify.com/products/22-reloader-kit

    Repriming Compound:

    https://sharpshooter-22lr-reloader.myshopify.com/products/prime-all-repriming-compound

    Cases & Bullets:

    https://fedarm.com/product/22lr-conical-bullet-ammo-kit/


    So about $150 - $160 maybe more or so for everything depending on shipping costs but again not bad at all.

    ,
    And is this a good book to learn the basics of reloading? I read the reviews and everyone says its pointed directly toward beginners and those that are just starting out in reloading. And its rated really well.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/148207379...olid=28Y0HSQ9YC65P&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it


    Anyways, any help, tips or advice is greatly appreciated! :)

    Thanks!
     
  2. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Seems like the time involved wouldn’t be worth the hassle but if you enjoy tinkering then go for it. I’ve never considered reloading.22 because it’s usually pretty cheap, I just stock up when prices and availability are good.
    I even stopped loading 9mm for a while because you could buy it so cheap
     
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  3. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

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    Exactly, during normal times I would buy .22 and 9mm like at least once a week or once every 2 weeks because it was so cheap.

    But like you said this is more for tinkering and to introduce me to the world of reloading. Plus once I get good at it, I'll have a skill that's hard to come by now a days with ammo being pretty scarce as it is.
     
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  4. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

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    Also this is more of a new hobby and a on the side thing when I've got time on my hands. I have a lot of factory ammo on hand and so I'm not in any kind of rush to buy everything and start reloading over night so to speak. I need to buy that book first so I know at least the basics. Then I can make a list of what I need to buy. And then I just organize and set them up where I want to reload and then I can start. :)
     
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  5. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I’m a visual learner, when I decided to start reloading, I watched a lot of YouTube videos on basics of reloading which really helped.
     
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  6. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

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    Should I do that instead of the book? Just watch videos as I go along. I'm also a visual learner, I learn so much faster by seeing it happen rather then reading just words. I'm just not sure which is better, reading a book first or just jump right into it and just watch youtube vids as I go along.

    The thing is, I'm essentially working with explosives and so I don't to watch the wrong type of vids by accident with people that don't have much experience and what not and then I understand it wrong because I'm still new to this and then it becomes confusing and then I make a mistake on my part you know.

    I think where as a book, I'm just reading the basics. But on youtube, people are all gonna have their different types of methods and techniques on how they reload. And so I'm not gonna know who's doing it right and who's it doing wrong unless I have some basic knowledge on reloading my self.
     
  7. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don’t think you should do anything “as you go along”.... just watch videos when you get time to get use to the process of reloading, the goal would be to know kinda what you are doing before you jump right in. Then, get several reloading manuals so you can study them..... then I would get your reloading set up, after your research you might decide to get a totally different set up than what you first thought (happened to me)

    Note: I’m mainly talking about reloading in general, I don’t know anything about reloading.22lr
     
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  8. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    PAN,
    WOW! Way to much work and time for me!
    I like to load but time is of the essence. Not to mention how much time it would take for the 22 LRs to produce and so few rounds.
    But if one has a lot of time and likes to experiment go for it!:)

    03
     
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  9. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Well-Known Member

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    PANDEMIC, How did you watch that video? I wanted to throw my laptop after the first couple minutes!
    I just gotta ask, Why would you want to waste all that time doing it, and take a big chance on having a squib round lodging a bullet in your barrel?

    For $160, I can go to my local Walmart and buy about 4k rounds of bulk Wichester 555 ammo.
    Reloading 22lr isn't worth the trouble or time involved!
     
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  10. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

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    I didnt watch the whole thing, I just watched the part where he was reloading and the part where he was test firing them.

    I'm curious, how does a squib load happen from reloading?

    Do you think reloading .22lr is good at least just to get started and experiment?

    Because I thought reloading larger calibers like 9mm or .223/5.56 or 12G for example is not only more complex but also more expensive when it comes to the equipment that you'll need.

    The reloading .22lr is just temporarily just so I can see what reloading is really like and get some experience and knowledge. And then as I progress I can move into calibers like 9mm, .223/5.56, 12G etc.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2020
  11. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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  12. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

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    Thanks! That makes more sense.
     
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  13. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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  14. Notrighty

    Notrighty Well-Known Member

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    Sounds more interesting than practical. I thought 9mm and 38 special were very tedious to reload. What happens when the firing pin lands in the dent of previously fired case? How many times can you reload till that is happening often?
     
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  15. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I think it is a complete waste of time: The rimfire case is made to use once. It is not going to be reliable and safe to reload.

    Spend the money for a decent reloading kit, and get started doing center fire, where the lessons learned are actually useable for something else.
     
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  16. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

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    HARD to reload 22lr economically (cheaper than you can buy it); and even HARDER to do it reliably.

    I'm a reloader and LOVE it; maybe even more than shooting but would only consider reloading rim-fire in the most dire of circumstances. Pick a different caliber to start down the reloading rabbit hole; trust me.
     
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