Reinforcing a "locker" style cabinet?

Discussion in 'Gun Safes' started by therhino, Nov 26, 2012.

  1. AZdave

    AZdave Well-Known Member

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    Locks only keep honest men honest.

    I have a name brand fire safe I keep my important documents in.

    Of course I lost the key and needed a car title or my DD-214.
    The car thief's screwdriver (that's another story) was nearby and the over foot long lever pop the safe.

    Like it was said by superc previously, my gun safe keeps my 4 year old grand son at bay. And that is not an easy thing to do!
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2017
  2. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    i have to agree, that most of the steel lockers are mainly to keep small children and unauthorized people from gaining access, and would never under any circumstances keep a determined thief out if he has alt least five minutes to spare getting into it.

    and i agree, even the most expensive and heavy gun safe will not keep a thief out either if he has the time and tools to either get it open or to take it with him to open up at his leisure.

    but there is an alternative, that i use. it may or may not work for some, but is something to consider, stealth. it's very hard for a thief to steal your firearms or valuables if they can't find them. there are even products on the market that help with this. how far you would need to go with this concept would depend upon how many or how much you want to hide. over the years, after looking at videos and websites online, i have seen ideas on how to hide things in your home range from simple to really elaborate. many of them can be done by anyone with a little bit mechanical aptitude.
     

  3. big shrek

    big shrek Well-Known Member

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    Know that feeling ;)
    Good place to start, as most folks see a chained-up
    freezer and think it's chained to keep kids out...
    Especially if you hang a few kid stuff pics/drawings on it.
     

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    Last edited: Feb 24, 2017
  4. Kobs

    Kobs Member

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    This is what I have, it's an old paint and flammable stuff garage cabinet. It had a flimsy file locker lock (one inch key) and a lift open mechanism handle locking up and down with 1/4 inch rods.
    I covered the handle part with a piece of steel and riveted it on, changed the lock with a round key one and reinforced it on both sides with stainless steel washers and changed the 1/4 inch rods with 2 cold rolled 2 inch flat bars. Finally made a hole all the way through the side in the doors and slid another 2 inch flat bar through and put a padlock on it (pic shows a cheap master but changed it to a disk lock style padlock since.)
    It's far from burglar proof but it's not going to open in 2 minutes.
    Edit: forgot to mention that it's also bolted to the side and back wall reinforced with a piece of 2 inch flat bar from the inside to prevent the steel from ripping

    Locker (1)sm.jpg locker.JPG latch.JPG lock.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2017
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  5. Balota

    Balota ... but I used to play keyboards. Staff Member

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    That's a great conversion. And it provides some level of fire protection. Not as much as when it's frozen, but lots of insulation.
     
  6. Balota

    Balota ... but I used to play keyboards. Staff Member

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    Kobs, if the bad guys know what you have and where it's stored, they'll bring suitable tools to shred the thin metal.

    You might consider a cable through all the trigger guards to tie them together. If that seems like a PITA to you when getting your guns out, think how much of a pain it will be to someone trying to deal with that cable from outside with the door still closed.
     
  7. microadventure

    microadventure Active Member

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    If you can't solve the problem, change the problem: Build an angle iron frame around it, angle sticking up next to the door, so a pry bar can get no traction on the door. Cover the door with something thick. a steel plate would be ideal, but even 3/4" plywood would be good. With that frame around the door the pry bar will just chew the plywood.
     
  8. Kobs

    Kobs Member

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    I'm retired and almost always home, I am my own security :D. I would surely notice anyone parking for days trying to figure out when I'm out and I pray for the fool who's going to try it when I'm there. I have this thing for the stupid Canadian gun laws and those laws are there mostly to prevent me from accessing my guns too quick in case I need them. So I have an adequate gun locker, law is fine with it and that's all I'm allowed to say publicly :p

    And btw, my own brother doesn't even know what I have, No one sees me loading range stuff in my car basically no one knows I have guns and those who do (range members and gun sites) don't know where I live
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2017
  9. Balota

    Balota ... but I used to play keyboards. Staff Member

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    That's the best form of security. Good job, Kobs!
     
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  10. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Well-Known Member

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    Every "Gun Safe" on the market is easily broken into with a Sawzall or a grinder with a cut-off wheel from the side / top / or back of the safe.
    They are all made out of 10-12 ga steel,not very secure to a real thief that wants your firearms. The door of a gun safe is the strongest part,and really most aren't that strong,most can be bypassed with a 6' demolition bar and a pry bar.

    The best way to secure them is by building walls around the safe,or better yet,conceal the safe so it isn't seen in an open area in a room.
     
  11. Kobs

    Kobs Member

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    ^^^ I thought of building a wall in front of my cleaning bench/gun locker and make some kind of a secret door entrance as a "i'm bored out of my head" project lol
     
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  12. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Another thought! If you have a home alarm system and maybe put the Cabinet in a Closet or other locked room or area (Like a Closet with Locked Door) it would increase your security of the weapons a whole bunch. With an alarm going off the thieves will not usually waste anytime to go completely through the home and normally they only grab what they can snatch up easily and get out with. An additional locked area would take too much time to break into the locked area and then brake into the cabinet. Only a thought!

    03
     
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  13. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    excellent suggestion Mr. Sniper.

    remember time is your friend and the thief's enemy. the longer he has to take to gain entrance to your safe or valuables the better it is for you, that he will move along to something easier.

    nothing, short of Fort Knox is immune from being broken into by a determined thief intent on stealing your stuff. if they want to steal your stuff, and they have the time and tools, they can steal your stuff. so whatever you can do to limit the time they have, or have to take longer to gain access is good for you.

    the optimum scenario is to not allow them to gain entrance into the house in the first place. and if they do gain access, the harder, or longer they have to spend inside to get any valuables works in your favor.

    other methods that IMO that would help deter or hinder their progress are dogs and an alarm system that makes lots of noise. thieves do not want to draw attention their activities.
     
  14. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Part of the fun of living in a rented place is figuring out where you can hide things, and still have a security deposit when you move out.

    all I'm going to say is, there are 6 safe\locker units in my house, and only 2 are in plain sight.

    Some of the neoighbors, who actually paid attention, and weren't drunk or stoned as we were moving in may have seen all, or more like most, of them going in, but I can tell you it would be a real PITA to find them now, especially with 190 pounds of territorial labs running free up here, while we are out.

    And WAY harder if we are home.

    As to the two in plain sight, anyone trying to take them would leave some big hols in the floor and the walls, trying to do so, and have to have a crew to get them out. only way around having to demolish the walls and floor is to get them open, and all are reinforced on the inside at this point, and at the corners and door frames.

    And yes, modifications to the place were run by, and approved by, the land lord prior to the work being done, as well as being fully removable upon termination of our rental agreement. have also added a few hidden storage places, that he does know about, that will stay with the place after we are gone. hide in plain sight type of things.

    Now, if I can just get him to clear that secret tunnel from the basement to the garage...........
     
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  15. Kobs

    Kobs Member

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    The previous house I lived in had one of those bunker style concrete patio 12X12 and under through an opening in the foundation of the basement which had an entrance steel door, was this room with 8 inch thick walls and just a round 4 inch hole in one of the wall (right side on the pic) I miss that house, this would've been an awesome gun/reloading room but I had to sell it.
    [​IMG]

    Edit: this was the entrance, with a little time and money I would've replaced that door with a vault door
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2017
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  16. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    One that I have seen that I thought scored pretty well on the stealth scale, and is homemade-

    Find a scrapped electric water heater- 40-50 gallon. Turn it around, on the side opposite the cover panels for the thermostat/ heating element, use a Sawzall or abrasive saw to cut the opening through the outer shell (on the back side). Remove outer shell and insulation, and then cut an opening in the inner pressure tank. Be neat, 'cause THAT piece is going to be your door. Set that piece aside, remove heating elements from inside tank. Clean out the Blurgh! from inside, set fan blowing in to dry tank. After drying a few days, add 4 low profile casters to the bottom, set well in from the edges to conceal them. Add water line stubs that go up, over and down a few inches below the top. Same with a length of Romex wiring. Take your saved bit of tank wall, add hinges with a secured hinge pin and a lock.

    Add a foam pad for the bottom, magnetic barrel holders (Got two barreled holders at Tractor Supply) pistol holders optional. Set in utility room or garage. Fill with guns, then turn it so that your hatch faces the wall.

    Nobody looks at a water heater.
     
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  17. microadventure

    microadventure Active Member

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    Kobs likes this.