Regional dialects

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by boatme98, Sep 25, 2020.

  1. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    I had some friends from small towns in western Pa. and remember them saying "you uns" and Frigidaire for refrigerator no matter what make.
     
  2. BullMoose429

    BullMoose429 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Worcester is definitely a big dividing line. East of that line is a whole different world from Worcester and west
     

  3. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The only thing I have more trouble with than Cockney is Brooklynese.
     
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  4. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    Cockney is now known as Estuary English, and has been adopted by many folks who don't qualify as a real 'Cockney'. Those who speak standard English call it 'the common South East vernacular'.

    Where we live, in rural Cambridgeshire, there is a distinct element of Norfolk and Suffolk accent by the in-livers - those born and raised here, to the extent that older members of the population, like my dear old pal Geoff, who died earlier this year, where as near as darnit to incomprehensible to somebody who had moved into the area, known as Fenland.

    I'll try and find an example for ya.
     
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  5. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have frog stranglers and gully washers.
     
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  6. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Missouri: Youins.... “Youins get over here”
     
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  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Back in the 6o's, we had a bunch of Basic Trainees that had been drafted from little villages in Louisianna. Where the TV shows were broadcast in FRENCH. Trying REAL hard to decipher whatindahell Pvt. Boudreau is trying to tell you.
     
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  8. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You'uns, like young'uns?

    I'm not from Missouri, but I'll admit I occasionally use the term "young'uns" (or "young pups") to refer to kids.

    A lot of folks around me, these days, use the phrase "y'all" to refer to the plural "you." (As in, of course, "you all.") Haven't heard "all y'all" yet, though some have said it's prevalent hereabouts.

    Growing up, there weren't many regional phrases in use locally, so far as I know, that were clearly different from the rest of the country. Until "surf speak" became commonplace. But that was decades ago.


    Would like to find a good book, at some point: Regional Phraseology and Idiom of Nations, or something like.
     
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  9. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I’ve listened closely, they pronounce it “you in’s” but heck I don’t dare ask them for the spelling or definition
     
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  10. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Ever notice that here in the South, everything is broken, and must be repaired?

    "I'm fixing' to go to the sto." (As in grocery sto, liquor sto, etc)

    And the not-so-subtle difference between "Bless his heart" and "Bless his little heart". Yes, that one word makes a MAJOR change.
     
  11. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    “Over Yonder” don’t hear it much anymore but use to around here
     
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  12. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    Where I was born if you weren't from there, you were "from away". On Cape Cod you'd be from "Off Cape"
     
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  13. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have those also. I guess that is when it is 'raining like a cow pissen on a flat rock'!!!;)
     
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  14. microadventure

    microadventure Well-Known Member

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    What I hear from my Tennessee friend is not youins. It's yuns
     
  15. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ever hear that a girl was "Jes cuter than a speckled puppy dog."

    Or "Purtier than a Jersey cow in a field of clover.":D
     
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  16. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When I first brought my new French wife home to meet the folks we were all riding around on the place in his pickup. Dad was saying things like "That's my best cow over yonder on the ridge" and "Over yonder is my watermelon patch. We'll go by and seef one's ripe."

    We got back to the house my wife got the chance to whisper to me "What's a "yonder?"

    ellis
     
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  17. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Growing up, my grandfather and contemporaries from his town would often say: "The other day, thus and such was ..." Which could mean something that had occurred anywhere from last Tuesday to decades ago. Gotta love that.
     
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  18. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    My late father, a Cork man, used to say things like 'hanging to pieces', and of a bragger, 'he's as full of p*ss and wind as a barber's cat...' and for something he wasn't keen to do right now, 'I'll put it on the long finger...'
     
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  19. SRK97

    SRK97 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I like Is' and theys'