Regional dialects

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by boatme98, Sep 25, 2020.

  1. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hairbear, your presence is requested at the music thread.
     
  2. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    Warshington
    Kroger’s (not Kroger)

    Hafta (=have to)

    That dog don’t hunt (It’s not going to work)
     
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  3. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    Well, you know....
     
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  4. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Went to visit Yankee stadium a few years ago, that was a lot of fun listening to the New York accents, they got beat so that made it even more interesting, nothing like listening to an upset New Yorker
     
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  5. BullMoose429

    BullMoose429 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You’re absolutely right- New England has quite a diverse array of dialects. I was raised in a small town in Central Massachusetts (west of the city of Worcester- pronounced Wooster) before moving to Maine. There is the boston accent, the Worcester accent, and the Worcester Hills accent. The Boston accent is what most folks think of when they think New England- they would pronounce Worcester as Woohstah. The Worcester accent is found in the city of Worcester and the its two suburbs just to the south (Auburn and Millbury) and they’d pronounce Worcester as Wisteh. The Worcester hills accent is found in the rural communities found north and west of Worcester and south of Worcester’s two suburbs- those who have this accent (such as myself) pronounce Worcester as Wister.

    The accent here in Maine is similar to the Worcester Hills accent but is a lot little different.

    Sadly- many of these accents and dialects are dying out- and with them goes the histories and cultures that made these places great. In Central Massachusetts- the generic white suburban mass from the Boston metro has been moving farther and farther west in search of more places to build cheap, ugly, soulless mcmansions. Many of the farms and forests that made where I grew up such a great place to grow up have been clear cut and gentrified so that the cul-de-sac types can find a cheaper place to put their minivans and cookie cutter houses.
     
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  6. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If y'all ain't all just like Crocodile Dundee, the we know nothing at all about you.
     
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  7. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Well-Known Member

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    Mate he's the basic Aussie ratbag.................. fairly close to the majority of Aussies attitudes to a lot of things and a sense of humour.
     
  8. Ingramite

    Ingramite Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Regional Dialects?

    It's been my pleasure to have worked in many areas of our country.
    The lasting impression from all of that moving around is that no matter where I was...never a local. Always sort of looking in from the outside or better describbed as "not here to stay, just play".

    You know the feeling when seated for dinner you ovehear some locals speaking as they speak to each other. You and your wife just look each other in the eye and smile because it's always so charming.

    One of these assignments brought us to post-Katrina New Orleans.
    For the next 10 years we honeymooned there. Living Uptown and taking the streetcar to make groceries. We lived like tourists after we got the first couple of years in the distant rearview. Yes, it was a combat zone for a while. Chilling to see the National Guard policing the city.

    I have never been in a more culturally diverse place in my life. Almost down to the dialects between different neighborhoods. So they can listen to each other talking and have a pretty good idea of where the person went to high school.

    So New Orleans has been heralded as the northmost Caribbean city. The city that care forgot. Appointments or showtimes are really like a suggestion. Cajuns speaking to each other in French....all sorts of unidentified language floating on the breeze.

    More lingo and slang than I can even attempt to do justice with here. If I had to sum it up? Genuinely friendly.
     
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  9. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Well-Known Member

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    It is? I'll go have a squizz now then.
     
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  10. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I lived in Miami after hurricane Andrew and had the same impression. I have also spent some quality time in New Orleans. Of the two, I prefer New Orleans.
     
  11. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    We just think Australia is...... different.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Isn't that Nu Awe lins?
     
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  13. BullMoose429

    BullMoose429 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I wanna see this but for moose or bear- or a bear trying to eat jelly donuts out of the trash- that happens a lot in Maine- granted- there are a lot of rednecks with 44’s who put those trash cans full of donuts out in the woods
     
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  14. microadventure

    microadventure Well-Known Member

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    somewhere in between N'orlins and N'awlins. brush by the R, don't make contact.
     
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  15. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah but do any of your critters shape up like this......................

    [​IMG]
     
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  16. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    Bull moose, I've lived around the US too. Ever since I was very young I can just say, "I'm not from here, I just live here."
     
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  17. Mcsorleyprobert

    Mcsorleyprobert Active Member

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    Not sure of dialect.

    I visit Florida quite often, I’m always asked, am I from the north, or somewhere else.

    I never thought of Chicago area people having an accent.
    I guess we do.

    Nashville, Georgia, Kentucky, we get asked where we’re from.

    Never thought we had an accent.

    I always thought everyone else had one
    :)
     
  18. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    Nobody thinks they have an accent. It's everybody else that can't speak! :D
     
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  19. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    I worked for a company with HQs in St. Paul Minnesota. We had a trainer from Home Office that came down to Richmond VA. Her session opened with:
    "Hi there! I'm BARb, and I'll be your trainer today- okey-dokey? Uf dah, you people sure talk funny down here, doncha know?" delivered with a pure Minny-Soda accent with a touch of Norvegian in there somewhere.

    Hmmm- yeah we do Barb- but we're not the only ones.....

    Anyone that thinks they don't have an accent simply has not traveled.
     
  20. BullMoose429

    BullMoose429 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I consider myself as from Maine. And Central Massachusetts isn’t that different from most of Maine.
     
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