Regional dialects

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by boatme98, Sep 25, 2020.

  1. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    By state or by area, what strange or different words and phrases are used by the locals?
    Where I'm from there's a practically unique language much like Smith and Tangier islands in the Chesapeake.
    If you're "from away" it could be tough understanding the locals.
    Although we moved when I was young, my folks would occasionally pop out some of these gems.
    Here's a few, see if you can guess what they mean. No Googleing.:D

    Put da side back in 'er.
    What a mausey day
    I'll put da ol slut on.
    Who knit ya?
    Stay where your to till I comes where your at.
     
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  2. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'll take a stab at it.

    It's finished.
    What a crappy day.
    here's the wife.
    Who made you king?
    Wait for me.
    :)

    ellis
     
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  3. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Smith and Tangier DEFINITELY have their own dialects- so does the the Eastern "Shur" of VA. For some reason, the day prior to today is "yersterday".

    Some of the watermen on down thru the Carolinas speak the Queen's English- the dialect is actually Elizabethan English. When the water in the bay comes in as much as it's going to, it's "Hoigh Toide". Get back in the hills and hollers of Appalachia, you will here the influence of Scotch-Irish heritage.

    Knew a young lady from NW North Carolina- her Granny lit into her when they were talking, and she spoke the word "white"- instead of the down home "whayt".

    Listening to a cashier couple of weeks ago, said "You don't sound like yer from around here.." She grinned, said "Nope- where'd think I'm from?" I said "Islip". Her jaw dropped- "Omigawd- I lived 10 miles from Islip (Long Island).

    My bride is a West Country lass, born in Devon, and grew up on the Devon/Cornwall border- and that is assuredly NOT a London accent.

    Gives some flavor to life- hearing different accents. dialects, and figures of speech.
     
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  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    And I think that would be:
    Close the window (here we say winder)
    It's a foggy day
    I'll make us a cuppa
    Who are your folks (here it's "Y'all got kin 'round heah?")
    Stay there- am on my way

    Yeah- I'm a CFA, but spent some time hanging out with Princess Pat's boys (Canadian Airborne)- and a couple of them were Newfies. We figured we could use them like the Navajo Code Talkers!

    If you think Newfie is strange, do NOT try to hang with the Kamaʻāina (Hawai'ian for local boy) In between borrow words from japan and Spain, Pidgin and Hawi'ian, it can be fun. Made food for a lunch with a co-worker, who thought it was exceptionally good- expressed as "Broke da mouf, bruddah!"
     
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  5. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Nothing like the slang in the inner city of Chicago. Not only the words used but the accent. I’m in Oklahoma now. People can always guess I’m from the Great Lakes region.
     
  6. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    C3, five for five
    Ellis, sorry, only two but pretty good.
     
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  7. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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  8. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In Nashville we were told y'all sho do tawk funny.
    My wife would feel at home in Fredericksburg. New Braunfels, Boerne and Luckenbach Texas. She is Austrian and German is spoken in those towns. We wanted to go visit the Hill Country but every time we had an opportunity it was heavy storms.
     
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  9. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm surprised I got two! :)

    ellis
     
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  10. microadventure

    microadventure Well-Known Member

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    when I was in Miseryssippi I heard endless references to "Tha spearier whot ross." ( pronounced as in possible )

    in my home town, in the little finger area of lower Michigan, 90 percent of the population appends "anyways?" to the end of a question, with a rising inflection:

    has the mail come, anyways?
    what's on TV, anyways?

    6 percent of people just have to be different, so they say "anyhow?"
    3 percent have to be different from the people who have to be different. they say "anywho?"

    leaving that one percent. the ones who end a sentence with "anywho, high, hay?"

    and they are not aware that they do it.
     
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  11. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Down here, we all speak American the way God meant us to. It is youse guys from up nath that talk funny.
     
  12. tomon

    tomon Active Member

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    Don't forget Pittsburghese!
     
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  13. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Traveling in the North East it was apparent to me, someone had stolen all the Rs from the English language!!:p

    03
     
  14. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    When small, I moved to Cape Cod. New England has a lot of different dialects. Not just by state but even by small regions within states.
    The Cape is only 70 miles from Boston yet a world away. While there's a lot of commonality these days, I think the Cape is probably more like Rhode Island than Northern Mass. historically.

    JTJ has one: blinkahs instead of turn signals.
    Bubblah (bubbler) water fountain
    Jimmies, chocolate sprinkles for ice cream
    Spuckie, grinder
    Frappe, shake made with ice cream. A milk shake is milk and syrup.
    Cabinet, a Rhode Island frappe. Who knows why.
    Peeper, autumn tourist.
    Rotary, traffic circle.
    Frost heave, broken roads from freeze thaw cycles.
    Down cellar. Basement, as in "you brats get down cellar and watch tv!"
    Carriage, shopping cart.
    Tonic, any carbonated drink. Soda.
    Packie, package store (liquor store). "I'm gonna make a packie run."

    Stuffies, stuffed quohogs (large clams too tough to eat, chopped fine and mixed in bread stuffing, then baked in the clam shell. 2 served with a bowl of chowdah is a meal.

    And of course, Wicked! General exclamation. Combined with Pissah for extra emphasis. "That's a wicked pissah!"
     
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  15. microadventure

    microadventure Well-Known Member

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    it's called non rhotic. Hermione Granger does that too.

    in Boston they talk with a wide mouth: I pokk my cah in Hovvad Yodd. in New York they talk with a narrow mouth: Pawk ya caw? you don' need a caw in Noo Yawk.

    ifyouencounterarealactualfactualcowboyfromwesttexasoreastnewmexicowhichwecallwesttexastheytalkinanendlessmonotonemumbleandtheyneverpausetotakeabreath
     
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  16. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    Yes but you guys more than make up for it with endless "Florida man..." stories to keep us amused all year! :D
     
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  17. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A recent survey found that 98% of Florida Man stories were about immigrants from up Nawth.
     
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  18. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Oh, we do have regionalism all over the place. In Georgia, any soft drink is a coke (lower case c) Depending on where you are, a grocery bag can be a sack or a poke. You can have a sandwich, sammich, grinder, hero, sub or a po' boy. (Although the po'boy is SUPPOSED to be fried oysters)

    American Spanish also has its own... differences. A bruja (j is an h) is a witch- but in NM it is what a junkie uses to shoot up. A rubber tired backhoe loader is a mano de chango (paw of the monkey)- but do NOT use that in Puerto Rico- it is obscene.

    Of course, the military has its own language. A full field layout inspection is junk on the bunk. Your field gear was ta-50. The folding can opener on your dog tags was a P-38 or a John Wayne. But if you caught yourself referring to your wife as Household 6, you were too far gone.
     
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  19. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The New Englanders use those leftover R's to add to things like Alasker ala JFK.
     
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  20. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Well-Known Member

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    And you Yanks reckon we Aussies talk too fast and have a weird lingo:D:D
     
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