Refinishing a gunstock?

Discussion in 'DIY Projects' started by GSpears471, Mar 31, 2013.

  1. GSpears471

    GSpears471 New Member

    58
    0
    0
    I have read several articles about refinishing gunstocks. Most of them do not recommend sanding them unless it is absolutely neccesasry. I have refinished 2 or 3 by using spray on paint stripper as they recommend. As they also stated you can take out dents and dings by using a moistened cloth and a common clothes iron, essentially lifting the grain back to its original height. As far as finish that can be a personal preference, I like to use Tru-oil. However, sometimes you might want to use an oil-based stain. Then after throughly drying
    follow it with several coats of tru oil. Whats your experience on this topic?
     
  2. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

    4,823
    0
    0
    I'll sand them...I"ll sand the crap out of them~!!:p

    Each stock I've done was different. If I can save an older piece of wood then that's just great. I usually don't use spray on anything though. I have used a polyurethane on one before but it was just a I really wanted to be done with it deal and I did want it sealed up. The wood was not all that good to start with though so it was not like I was trying to save an almost lost cause.

    I love true Oil. I've also used linseed oil. Many say never use a stain but if I want to make it look a little different then I'll do that too. I'm currently doing one for an old Glenfield 60. It was really dinged up and the checkering was about wore off. I used a little ebony stain on trhe checkered area to make it look more defined.
    Here it is
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Not all that bad for a stock that looked to live in the back of a truck for 10 years. I'll be Duracoating the metal come time in the next few weeks.:)
     

  3. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

    4,269
    22
    48
    Sanding can be OK and usually necessary. The main problem with sanding is being very careful not to destroy the wood-to-metal fit and fitting of the buttplate/grip cap etc. Tru-oil is great! Many times I have used several coats of Tru-oil and then used bronze wool to bring it down to a non-shiny rich looking finish. Staining with oil-based stains is fine and can really change the look of the stock to make it pleasing to your eye(the only opinion that counts).
     
  4. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    sometimes the condition of the finish on the wood determines sanding or how much. personally i like to use the least amount of sanding needed to achieve the results i want. i do use stain to get the color i want or to bring out the grain more.

    i alsolike to use Tung oil as well. one of my finishing procedures i use involves using Johnson's paste wax on the stock with very fine steel wool.
     
  5. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

    4,823
    0
    0
    Very true about making sure to keep all the wood to metal fit right as well as the but plate.

    I like Tung oil too...A lot of peopel don't even think about it's ability to bring some near dead wood back to life.

    A lot of the what I use and how will have to do with what I want to finish up with and what I"m starting out with. An old not to kind handled stock can leave wood looking pretty bad. I'm kind of hard headed and will try about anything to get an old stock to come back from the dead.

    Of course if it's something like an Enfield in the OEM wood or the like I try pretty hard to get it back to origional. Some sporterised stock thing or something like a 10-22, marlin 60 type thing and all bets are off though. Figure even if I screw it up it's pretty easy to get another one.
     
  6. daremo18

    daremo18 New Member

    3
    0
    0
    A cool trick I learned after sanding is "de-whiskering". Sanding causes little fibers to lift from the wood when its wet . After final sanding, wet the wood with a rag dipped in water then use a hairdryer to quickly dry it. Little whiskers will rise from the wood and you can knock them off with 0000 steel wool. This will result in super smooth finish and won't whisker when you stain.

    Daremo
     
  7. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    i like Tung oil, because if it's good enough for fine furniture refinishing, then it's good enough for a nice gunstock!

    that's nice detail. never knew that. good information there. thank you for that.
     
  8. GSpears471

    GSpears471 New Member

    58
    0
    0
    You nailed it one of mine was also a glenfield 60. Mine doesn't like hollow points, i took it back to the gunsmith he test fired it and didn't have any problems. Confused I took it home. Took it to the range again had the same problem ( feeding the last few rounds) I started asking around most everyone I talked to said to only use round nose ammo, no problems since.
     
  9. Minionsram

    Minionsram New Member

    606
    1
    0
    I reckon I'll add to the love of Tung oil replies. I have used all sorts and think the Tung oil is best.
    As far as lifting dents out with a moist rag and an iron on steam, yes it works wonders with dents that are there with the exception of the ones with a very sharp crease in them. Like if you dropped the rifle on a corner of a table type. Just make sure you let the area dry and re-acculamate to the rest of the stock before trying again and when finished before you try to seal it. It sometimes takes a few tries before you can get the bad ones lifted. If it don't work after one or two tries you need to sand and fill with a good stainable wood putty.
     
  10. GSmith1883

    GSmith1883 New Member

    90
    0
    0
    I had to do a stock refinish on a Winchester model 70 after the masking tape i put on for the bedding job pulled off most of the factory finish when I removed it. I refinished the stock with a oil based verathane and mud rubbed with velvet oil, and it came out very nice. The problem is the product seeped through the edges of the tape masking the checkering and gummed up the borders. Is there a better way to clean this out besides using a stripper? I'm afraid it will strip the finish I just did around the borders of the checkering.
     
  11. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    i use a very simple method of refinishing gunstocks. learned it from a friend of mine. first of all, i use only the sanding needed. less is more to me. i sometimes do use a paint stripper if needed. once i am to the bare wood i like to allow it to dry at least 24 hours to make sure it's completely dry.

    after using a tack cloth, i start with the first application of stain. i don't allow the stain to dry, and wipe it off with old t-shirts or old flannel cloth. i aplly as many coats as needed to obtain the level of darkness that appeals to me.

    i then allow the stock to dry at least 24-48 hours. after which i rub out the finish with Johnson's paste wax for wood, using very, very fine steel wool. i do this several times, then rub out the finish with very soft cloths afterwards. the finish comes out very similar to a satin finish when done. Tung oil can be applied if wanted.

    i have used this method with great success for many years now.