Recondition M1 carbine mags

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by BEYU, Jul 3, 2009.

  1. BEYU

    BEYU New Member

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    I'm new to the forum and new also to M1 carbines. I have wanted one for years and am just now waiting for my Inland M1 from CMP to arrive. It will be another month or so. I am slowly buying all the stuff I need to go with it.

    I bought some USGI (I think) magazines thru Gunbroker. They have some corrosion that needs to be removed. I figure that if there is rust on the outside, there is probably some inside the magazines as well. I hope some of you with more experience can offer advice.

    How do you avoid getting oil/solvents, etc. inside the mags where it would be tough to get it out - don't want oil on ammo, of course!
     
  2. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    Welcome to the FTF comunity, take a few and introduce yourself on the new members thread. The easy answer to you question is to disassemble the mags, something your going to want to do if they show any corrosion on the exterior.
     

  3. BEYU

    BEYU New Member

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    Thanks for your attention to my question. I'm not sure how to disassemble the mag without wrecking it.

    Just looking at it, it looks like the only way would be from the bottom — shove a small screwdriver or putty knife under the folded over metal, pry it up from both sides and then slide the bottom panel off? (Actually, wouldn't the spring just pop the bottom off?)

    Another thing about the spring inside — after all is cleaned up, how do you reassemble it?

    I want to proceed carefully so I don't bust anything - I've been known to be heavy handed once or twice, don't you know!
     
  4. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    You should be able the push down on the bullet rest on the top of the mag, turn it 90 degrees and take it out that way. Don't bend any of the metal on top of the mag. Work the spring out with out pulling on it hard. It goes back together the same way you took it apart so pay attention:D

    A lot of the vintage mags weren't ment to be reused over an extended time so yours might not. If that is the case use carberator cleaner to clean them, let them set for a few days then WD40 them and let them set for a few more days. For awhile you will have gunk on your shells but something you will have to deal with
     
  5. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    On the M1 Carbine magines I have, there is a removable floorplate (bottom of magazine) There is a small "divot" in this flat plate that can be easily pryed up with a awl or tiney screwdriver. While the floor plate is pryed up you can slide it off foreward and the spring and follower will come out. Be careful that the spring doesnt shoot out as you slide the floorplate off. If the spring is severly corroded you can get new ones from Wolf springs. Actually, it would be a good idea to change out springs for new ones anyhow. They're not very much money. As far as rust is concerned, I would use a oil base solvent (Hopps #9) and scrub the body, follower, and floorplate with stiff wire brush until rust is cleaned off. This may take some time depending on how much corrosion you have. A wire wheel on a bench grinder or drill motor could save time cleaning if it is really bad. When cleaned to your satisfaction, clean all oil residue off with CRC Break Clean or carb. cleaner. Re-blue if you want. I do not oil my magazines, (I keep them dry) however if it makes you feel better use a very light application of dry silicon spray lube. Re-assemble as it came apart. Actually when you get it apart it'll be pretty self explainatory how to re-assemble.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2009
  6. BEYU

    BEYU New Member

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    Thanks muchly.
    I will give it a try and let you know how it turns out. I have a bluing kit on order, so I will probably wait until I have it.
     
  7. BEYU

    BEYU New Member

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    Just getting back to the subject of reconditioning m1 carbine mags.

    The answers I got were of great help, especially from mrm14.

    As it turns out, his advice was perfect.

    By the time I got around to working on the mags, my m1 carbine from CMP had been delivered. CMP includes a reprint of the Ordinance Field Service manual from 1942. It shows an exploded view of the magazine, just exactly as it comes apart. The same thing is available in the book "The M1 Carbine Owner's Guide" by Larry L. Ruth and Scott A. Duff.

    I was able to get everything apart and cleaned up using a kit from Birchwood Casey. Re-blued, they look pretty good — of course the pitting from the rust is visible, but what do you want for 60 plus year old stuff?

    Thanks a lot to all,

    BEYU