recoil on 45-70 lever ?

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Flat Tire, Aug 18, 2010.

  1. Flat Tire

    Flat Tire New Member

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    So, what is the recoil like, 12 gauge ? lightweight 30-06 ? Would you take it to the range and shoot five shots and be done with it or a hundred shots?
     
  2. Silvertip 44

    Silvertip 44 New Member

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    Well, Flat, it's going to be a bit hefty. Probably somewhere on par with a 3" 12 ga high velocity turkey load in a light Mossberg 500. I have a .444 and with full power loads and a 240 gr. projectile, it was getting to be a bit uncomfortable, but was a fine deer killer---what was left.
     

  3. Flat Tire

    Flat Tire New Member

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    why do you need that big-o-gun for deer ?
     
  4. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Because it is fun to shoot. The 45-70 make for a great brush gun for deer, hogs, and many other game animals.

    My next rifle if going to be a Marling guide gun in 45-70. It is like hunting with History.
     
  5. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    My Guide Gun kicks like a 12 ga slug with my hot load (340@2100fps). A bit less with factory (detuned) ammo.
     
  6. Flat Tire

    Flat Tire New Member

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    What is "factory (detuned) ammo" ?
     
  7. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    Factory ammo, except for Buffalo Bore and the like, is loaded down to be safe in the Trapdoor Springfields. Naturally since they aren't safe with higher pressure loads almost all factory loads are loaded down. The exceptions are Buffalo Bore and those are only safe in modern rifles with locking breech such as the Marlin lever rifles, falling blocks such as the Ruger and Sharps, and break actions such as the H&R.
     
  8. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The older rifles were designed to shoot the original black powder cartirdges. The modern smokeless powders are capable of making MUCH TOO MUCH pressure for these older rifles. The major manufacturers are concerned about their liability if somebody puts a high pressure round into a gun that can never be expected to safely shoot it.

    SO, they "detune" or load the ammo lightly so they do not kill some idiot with a trapdoor Springfield.
     
  9. Silvertip 44

    Silvertip 44 New Member

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    I haven't taken the .444 out of the safe for hunting in over 15 years. I got it due to a deal I couldn't refuse. Deer hunting now is with .308 and smaller.
     
  10. freefall

    freefall New Member

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    Silvertip, if you want to sell that .444 pm me. The Lovely Mrs has never forgiven me for trading of "hers" 20 yrs ago. I bought her the short, ported Outfitter model, but she just hasn't cottoned to it.
     
  11. superc

    superc Member

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    That's interesting. I have not had good luck at close ranges with the .308. The durn bullets just zip right on through then kill trees on the other side as the deer staggers away. I personally have much better knock downs at close ranges with hot loaded .45 slugs and would have expected the .444 loaded with 240 gr. XTPs or similar to be a superb close range deer rifle.
     
  12. Flat Tire

    Flat Tire New Member

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    How much do the deer weigh, in your neighborhood ?
     
  13. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    It is not about the size of the deer man.

    the 444 and 45-70 are not long range rounds. The guns and cartridges are made to use in close quarters where your shots are not long shots but may be in heavy brush.
     
  14. superc

    superc Member

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    Between 150 to 290 or so. Pic below is fairly typical of what I take here in my yard. This one weighed about what I do, and I am over 220.

    My normal shooting range is about 10 to 20 yards. Sometimes closer than that. The brush can get pretty thick hereabouts. The Taylor scale supports my claim as a .308 gives a T score of only 17 while my .45 slugs at 1500+ fps score 22. That is at muzzle. Alternatively, as cptango states, if I was doing 300 yd shots, I would probably go back to the .308 as the 45 would have a lower score way out there and be easily beaten by the .308 as a game round.
     

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    Last edited: Aug 19, 2010