Recentley started prepping

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by onewaywooten, May 1, 2013.

  1. onewaywooten

    onewaywooten New Member

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    I've got some basics, ammo , guns and some food. I'm looking for opinions on where to prioritize . How much supply of each should I have ?? What else should I have in my stockpile ? Any comments (ansewers) would be appreciated.
     
  2. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    It seems to me that most people who "prep" struggle with these questions. A lot of it depends on where you live, whether you will most likely have to bug out or hunker down, how many you are prepping for, and other factors that apply to your individual situation.

    What is your water supply like? Will you be dependant on water storage, or do you have a well or other source available? Will you need to filter water?I think you should have a minimum of three months food supply for each person you are preparing for. I would have at least 500 rounds of ammo for each caliber of firearm you own.

    I recently realized that while I had been worried about ammo and food, I was ignoring some basics like nails and duct tape. Get a supply of batteries. Candles. Do you have a way to cook if the power was shut off? How about heat during cold weather?

    Think about what you would need for an extended camping trip.
     

  3. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    From a survivalist viewpoint, Shelter, then Water, then food. You can die from Hypothermia in a few hours if you have no proper shelter depending on the elements you are forced to survive in. Then you will need water to keep going. And food you can if you have to live for a few weeks without any.
    It is also nice to have a stash of supplies in different locations, just in case your main location is destroyed, or you have to make a run for it.
    Also a nice basic bolt action 22 rifle can become silent death using the right ammunition, and you could hunt at night and not attract any attention to yourself while doing so.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2013
  4. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    What kind of prepping end world, natural disaster , or war? It depends.
     
  5. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    There is a sister website to this one.................
    www.preparedsociety.com

    Lots of good info and good people. Stop in there and read awhile. You will be glad you did.
     
  6. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The hardest thing for some preppers to accept is that even though you have 5 ARs, 5 AKs, a half dozen 22s, a dozen handguns, and a pickup truck loaded with two pallets of ammo, you can't eat that stuff. Or drink it. Or use it to keep warm or dry.

    Ever wonder how much a bottle of ibuprofen or Tylenol would be worth in a survival situation? Or a vial of Tetracycline? Or Vicodin?? a LARGE bottle of multi-vitamin/minerals supplements?

    How about a sleeping bag, or even a blanket? Halazone tablets for purifying water?

    A small chainsaw and 2 gallons of fuel? A Coleman lantern? A ham radio? A cord of wood for the fireplace? A large box of batteries?
     
  7. gearhead396

    gearhead396 New Member

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    I have recently started prepping myself. And yes I have guns ammo and food. But i also have a good sized go bag. With rope/climbing gear, Water filtration tablets and two life straws. Fire starter, tender, small machete and knife, rain gear, a trail tent, coil spring and snare traps, datrex emergency food bars and water bags. First aid kit, mylar blankets/bags. a flashlight and batteries, extra clothes a coat. Aspirin, tylenol, Advil, nasal spray quick clot. and cricket 22 rifle and ammo. The cricket rifle is still on my to buy list though. Everything else is in my room ready to go. I believe it is important to have everything you need if happen to have to set up in them middle if no where. I have tried to think of everything but I'm always looking for more ideas. Oh I forgot I also have a set of 2 way radios.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2013
  8. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    How about friends.neighbors allies etc to go with??

    If your family is alone, what happens if you break Leg??
     
  9. gearhead396

    gearhead396 New Member

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    Yes good points I need to get other people In on it. Problem is most of my friends just think I'm crazy lol.
     
  10. rifleman77

    rifleman77 New Member

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    You may look into fishing gear and a bow or crossbow. If your not a hunter get a little experience this season. Guns are loud and scream "I have valuable items". Opening day for bows you never hear a sound. Opening day for firearms it sounds like ww3.
     
  11. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My friends and neighbors thought I was paranoid too. 20 years ago. Today, they're not quite so certain.

    We're not prepping for TEOTWAWKI, but for 2-3 weeks of trouble caused by a series of major terrorist attacks, a long trucking and/or rail strike, natural disaster, etc.
     
  12. MattShlock

    MattShlock New Member

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    Who's "we" pale face.
     
  13. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    people who are actually making some preparations rather tham make silly comment about others.
     
  14. kbd512

    kbd512 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I'm not sure what you're preparing for, but the things I worry about are as follows:

    1. Fire - The power company learned nothing from Ike. Every good storm we and all I have to do is look out my window and you'll get a good light show for a few seconds until the power dies because the power company never bothers to trim the trees until someone complains about it. This happens regularly.

    2. Flooding - We're at one of the highest points in Houston and a good hard rain can put enough water in the street to make it impassable for smaller vehicles and lower-lying areas almost always flood.

    3. Civil Disturbance - Hurricane Ike was a disaster barely contained by HPD. Street criminals are a small problem here. We don't live in a "bad" neighborhood, we just live right next to the "bad" neighborhood (which really means the next block over).

    4. Shortages of supplies, especially food and water, due to natural disaster and civil disturbances. Good luck finding batteries or water.

    After you live for a couple months in the Texas summer without air conditioning, the heat doesn't bother you as much but it's still not pleasant. Everything we have in the refrigerator is basically trash after a good storm or hurricane, not that we get too many hurricanes.

    My primary concerns, in order of importance, are as follows:

    Water - Drinking water only (5 gallon jugs); you can be dirty or take bird baths like we did after the hurricane. Sleeping on a bed was too hot and a little nasty, so we all slept on the floor like the dog except for my daughter who was an infant at the time.

    Food - We mostly have canned foods, cereals, grains, and things that you can cook on the porch with a Coleman if need be. Thankfully Ike didn't kill the natural gas, but it was too hot to cook in the house.

    Sanitation - I have a wife and young children, so toilet paper, feminine products, and a porta-potty and small shovel (back yard works just fine for the dog and it'll do for you, too).

    Medical Supplies - Bandages, tape, shears, alcohol/iodine/hydrogen peroxide, neosporin, benadryl, acetaminophen, loperamide, antacids

    Protection of Persons and Property - All you really need for normal situations is a good 9MM handgun, but civil disturbances are another matter entirely.

    Utilities - Electricity can be dangerous, extra fuses, electrically non-conductive gloves, and a voltage meter are a good idea. Know where your water cut-off is and have a wrench to shut it off. Having water from the tap was not a problem after the storm- there wasn't any because the pumping stations died. After a week or so, the water pressure gradually came back.

    Having quality flashlights and a lantern really helped at night.
     
  15. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    good points KBD.

    generator is always a good option for short term situations. they can keep your fridge going to prevent spoiled food and provide some lighting and small fans to remain somewhat comfortable.
     
  16. Gizord1

    Gizord1 New Member

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    I recently realized as much prepped gear as I own (too much, is that possible?), I am missing a vital basic. I wear contacts, but how will you get contacts in a survival/disaster situation? You won't, you'll need a backup pair of glasses. Which I don't have...

    Well, I have a pair, but my doctor (incorrectly) says they are the same prescription as my contacts. Which they aren't. I feel drunk with them on!

    So, you need to think of the basics, first. Get prescriptions, a LOT of food (maybe a natural source, too. I have a pond and a garden), water, maybe a water filtration system, a backup power source, toilet paper, tooth paste, medical supplies (you can never have too much), durable clothing for every season, basic tools, LOTS of soap, a radio (preferably one with a weather station/EBS), fuel or all your vehicles and appliances (IMO, diesel engines are good for prepping. They can run on practically anything that burns. Look into it.), kitchen and cooking supplies, a bicycle, stationary, lubricant for appliances and mechanical equipment, etc.

    Pretty much extra of everything you use on a daily basis.
     
  17. kbd512

    kbd512 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Notes on dealing the aftermath:

    1. Have a hundred dollars or so in small bills and change because the stores won't have power or, even when they have power, internet connections to accept credit cards. If you have supplies, don't go out because you ran out of your favorite beer.

    2. If you are short of supplies (food,water,medical supplies, or batteries in our case), after the authorities permit you to leave your home, get what you need fast. Avoid stores where people are fighting over goods; even if you really need it it's not worth getting injured over.

    3. Even hospitals will shut down without power and running water, although they do have generators and are somewhat prepared for short-term natural disasters. Again, avoid getting injured. On that note, avoid going out or working after dark, curfew or no curfew, to avoid being injured.

    4. Leaving after a major disaster is not an option. If you're going to leave, then leave well ahead of a disaster if prior warning is available and make sure your vehicle is GTG for a potentially extended drive (spare tire and tools to change a tire, extra gas, maps, and perhaps a spare battery if your battery is questionable). Your water, food, medical kit, sanitation items, and firearms do you no good if you leave them at home. There are only three major routes out of Houston. Know the back roads or expect to go nowhere fast.

    5. If the authorities tell you to shelter in place, then you're most likely safe exactly where you are. The biggest problem in getting out of Houston was people leaving who didn't need to and/or weren't prepared to actually leave.

    6. Having tools and men to clear roads is important. I dragged just about every limb and tree out of the street up and down the block. Everyone stood around and watched me until finally a neighbor a few houses down ran out and helped me drag the last tree out of the street. Don't expect anyone to help, but do get to know your neighbors so you can potentially get some help with clean up. Ambulances and fire trucks couldn't pass our street on either side of the median because of the number of limbs and trees in the street, which is why I removed them post-haste.

    I learned the hard way that while hand tools do work de-limbing and felling, a chainsaw is a lot faster and easier.

    7. Security is your own responsibility after a disaster. The police will be busy dealing with looters and murders. Instead of pointing guns at people, take pictures of people who don't belong in your neighborhood and point them out to your neighbors. Criminals and potential criminals really seem to hate that.
     
  18. bigjim

    bigjim New Member

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    I like everyone else is concern about survival in the case of a natural disaster. And I read all the preper posts thinking I can gain some insite on what to do. But the biggest problem is not how much water to store or what caliber of rifle or pistol to take with. The biggest problem as I see it is that there is a lack of understanding the KNOWLEDGE is the most important thing you need.

    Most items that we think we need are used up or gone in a short matter of time. Carring hundreds of lbs of equipment and supplies, will get you killed, you car/van/suv will be of no use to you. Carring water is not only time consuming but heavy and will slow you down. So what do you need?

    Well when you get dropped in the middle of the jungle in Panama, the only thing you take with is your clothes on your back and a hunting knife, that is it. You do have a vast knowledge of information on how to survive and are expected to use it.

    The problem with living in a push button world is that the buttons will not work in a SHTF environment. What you need is knowledge, get all the books you can carry from the library on survival and read them then teach them to your family for they can survive incase something happens to you.

    Then drive your van or suv to a national forest with no equipment in it and try out your survival knowledge, build a leanto, start a fire without matches or lighters, trap or snare small creatures for food or find grubs to eat, just don't get stopped for hunting without a lic. or out of season. Learn how to get water from plants, how many calories you need each day to survive, what plants are edible and which are posionous. How to navigate without a compus or GPS unit, which way streams flow, how to spear fish, how to make a teepee, how to make a stone ax, how to make spears, what plants can be used as string and how to make rope. How to deal with wild animals, how to tell the weather from the smoke from your camp fire. How to carve out wooden bowls, spoons and how to make knives and axes from base metals (iron) or from stone. Which caves will be safe and which will not.

    If you are going back to the Stone Age, you should learn how to live like a Stone Age Cave Man.

    Jim
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2013
  19. rifleman77

    rifleman77 New Member

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    Anybody heard of aquaponics? I'm curious as to how to set one up cheaply and what kind of fish are best to have.
     
  20. bigjim

    bigjim New Member

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