Ready to buy my first AK

Discussion in 'AK & SKS Discussion' started by Down_Town_Dalton, Aug 29, 2013.

  1. Down_Town_Dalton

    Down_Town_Dalton New Member

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    I found a NIB wasr 10/63 for 475$ at a LGS. I'm very un-knowledgable about AKs. Is this a decent price ? If not where should I look and how much more would be needed for a good quality rifle ? Also are there any certain things I need to look for when checking out the rifle ? Any helpful input is appreciated !!
     
  2. TheDesertFox

    TheDesertFox New Member

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    I say go for it. That's a great price for an AK
     

  3. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    Right now thats very cheap . I would not hesitate to pick it up at that price, and if you dont want it let me know where its available at ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2013
  4. Mark_Van_Goth

    Mark_Van_Goth New Member

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    Don't do it!

    DON'T DO IT!
    1)The WASR 10 isn't known for being a good AK.It is often cheap because it is not well made.
    2)Your first AK should be something special, if you got disappointed by the first AK, thank you'll have a bad opinion about a platform which is VERY GOOD.Don't miss a thing!.
    3)What are you supposed to do with the rifle?Don't set budget before you've defined what you're going to do with the rifle.Some AK are good for hunting; some other for tactical shooting; some other are collectible only.The price depends mainly on what you need.
    4)Think twice.You are not buying the rifle only, your buying ammo(it can be hard-to-be-found, expensive or else), modifications(e.g. new furniture, upgrades, etc....again....it can be expensive or impossible to be done.), parts kits to replace damaged parts.

    The best AK are the folowing:
    Chambered in the M43 ammo, 7,62x39
    -Zastava M70-Considered the best rifle by Tactical Shooter
    -Saigas 39-Considered very accurate, good for hunting
    -Type 56-Considered the general-purpose AK.Pretty good quality.
    -IWI or IMI Galil- Hybrid between AK-FAL-M16 concepts.Military very appreciated and beloved, extremely good performace!
    -AMD 65 & AK63-Hungarian made.One of the preferred rifles by contractors and security personnel. My opinion?IT ROCKS!

    Chambered in the 5,56X45
    -Galil/Galil ACE-See above
    -AK 101 or AK 102-Available for export to the USA.Nice, but I would not buy one.I don't like them.

    Chambered in the 5,45X39
    -AK74-Russian made,one of the most successful AK derivatives.It is still the main service rifle of the Russian forces. the M model is cool(AK74M, the upgraded version of the AK74)

    AVOID THESE RIFLES:
    -WASR 10+ the whole line Wars(it is chambered in several calibers)
    -Bulgarian o Egyptian stuff-These are known for being low quality products

    if you need more info, let me know.I'll be glad to help you.
     
  5. indy36

    indy36 New Member

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    I second staying away from WASRs, and just about anything assembled by the monkeys at Century. My Galil from them was a nightmare. The trunion was set wrong, the headspace was way off and it constantly failed to eject, and the Rockwell hardness of the receiver was so low and below spec it was deemed 'unsafe' by a very well known Galil expert...oh, and Century hung up on me when I called them about it. Buy assembled items from Century at your own peril. If you go Galil stay with IMI (made in Israel) but the price is very high. As for AKs, it's Arsenal guns all the way. They are about a grand but worth it.
     
  6. CrazedJava

    CrazedJava New Member

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    I passed on an AMD-65 last year. Still kicking myself over that one.

    Galils are not readily available in the US. You have pre 1990's ban models that are actual IWI Galils and go for $2,000 to $3,000. Then you have the Century Arms Golani which has a receiver made in America and the rest of the parts are milsurp but those are not being made anymore either. Cheaper, about $700 to $800 is a fair price, but may be difficult to find. Also, indy36's experience is not unique. Certain versions of the Golani, especially early models, are complete junk and Century Arms does not have good quality control.

    Also, I don't know if you can get a "new" Type 56 in the US anymore.

    WASR's are cheaper. Good rifles if you subscribe to the battle ready but not accurate philosophy of AK's.

    I personally like the overall looks of the Zastava and Mark is a big fan obviously, but they can be hard to find.

    Generally stay away from Arsenal unless you don't mind spending $1,000 and up for an AK. They're generally considered good but damn are they pricey. If money is no object though, knock yourself out.
     
  7. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    Maybe I have a older WASR 10 but I have not had a problem with mine and I know several out there will agree . Doesnt matter what brand or model every company kicks out a POS every now and then . How do I find out when my WASR was made ? Is there any way to know ?


    [​IMG]


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    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2013
  8. TheDesertFox

    TheDesertFox New Member

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    I haven't had a problem with my WASR 10/63 either. I must be luck of the draw.
     
  9. TheDesertFox

    TheDesertFox New Member

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    It should have a date on the left side of the reciever.
     
  10. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    For a little more than a 10/63, you can get a VEPR.

    Russian made, much stronger build, new, better

    barrel, receiver is twice as thick as your average

    AKM, and a fair selection of calibers, like .308,

    and 7.62X54R...
     
  11. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Just because you start with a hooker doesn't mean you can't date the preacher's daughter later.

    I really enjoyed the WASR my shooting buddy had; it never jammed or got picky about the flavor of ammo it was asked to spew. It was plenty accurate for plinking and wasn't really used for hunting or long distance accuracy.

    If you can find a better one for that price, then go for it; if not, enjoy the WASR and then sell it if you want to go further.
     
  12. FrontierTCB

    FrontierTCB Active Member

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    Agreed. I have a WASR I bought about 12 yrs ago (during the "ban" so Draganov stock) $375.00 at the time. Not the most quality weapon but worth the $$$. Never a malfunction.
     
  13. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If I were in the market for a high-quality AK at a reasonable price I would buy a Saiga. If high capacity magazines are a requirement, I would buy enough drop-in American parts to legally convert it.

    I have owned several AKs and I was impressed with the quality of the Saiga my son bought a couple of years ago.
     
  14. Mark_Van_Goth

    Mark_Van_Goth New Member

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    An exception doesn't become the rule

    As you can imagine, there are exception.Even I have shot some really nice WASR, but the majority of them are not that good.
     
  15. kbd512

    kbd512 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Let's talk about buying cheap guns for a moment.

    1. There's nothing wrong with cheap if it functions correctly, the sighting mechanism is true, and there are no other build deficiencies that would preclude its intended use.

    2. Generally speaking, lower cost products cost less because they are manufactured in ways that may negate proper function.

    3. With respect to 1, refer to 2.

    So, if that AK you found has been properly manufactured, then it's a good deal in today's market. If you don't know what to look for, it's a pretty safe to say that you shouldn't buy a cheap gun just because it's cheap.

    Now, if it were me, this is what I would look for, irrespective of the price of the AK.

    1. Does the magazine lock up properly? The side-to-side wobble due to the lack of dimples on the sides of the magazine well aren't that big of a deal, but does the notch and locking tab securely capture a 30 round steel magazine? If not, that's not something that's easy to fix. You need to have a 30 round magazine with you to determine this if the gun doesn't come with one.

    2. Are the sights canted or otherwise misaligned? Again, not easy to fix. Even if the trunnions aren't straight, if the sighting mechanism is properly aligned, with respect to the bore of the weapon, it's still a serviceable weapon as long as the barrel isn't canted too badly in the front trunnion.

    3. Are the trunnions riveted plumb in the receiver? Do both trunnions align with each other and is the barrel straight in the front trunnion? It doesn't take too much misalignment to make the weapon difficult to impossible to sight in at distance. The front sight only has so much windage adjustment.

    4. What kind of riveting job did the factory do? Are the sides of the receiver bent inwards anywhere from having too much force applied where the rivets were placed? You're not going to find many perfect riveting jobs, but if it's obviously bent inwards it can cause problems. Mark_Van_Goth posted a close-up of a properly riveted receiver. The heads on some of the rivets are split slightly. The rivet on the left hand side of the "IMPORTED *** GEORGIA,VT." marking is an example of the limit to which the receiver should be bent inward from excessive force applied in the riveting operation. Unfortunately, 1MM sheet steel is not very forgiving of crappy rivet jobs.

    5. Does the bolt carrier move freely within the receiver or are there places where it hangs up? This problem has two primary causes, the aforementioned excessive force applied where the rivets go and a poorly finished or improperly bent receiver flat. The bolt carrier will encounter some resistance when it rides over the hammer, but apart from that it should move freely and not bind anywhere. The wear mark from where the bolt rides over the hammer should be centered on the strike face of the hammer and not off to one side or the other, which would generally indicate misalignment of the hammer holes in the receiver.

    6. The rest of this is of lesser importance. Does the safety lever operate without unnecessary resistance or is it difficult to actuate? Is the safety lever too loose? Is the trigger pull smooth or gritty? Notice I didn't say light or without creep or over-travel. That's normal for an AK, but a gritty trigger is difficult to work with. If it feels like the trigger is moving across sand paper, that should tell you something's not quite right. The trigger is something a professional can fix or you can purchase upgraded replacement parts. If the trigger is reasonably smooth, don't mess with it.

    If you just want to shoot dirt clods, any rifle will do. However, if you're buying an AK for its intended use, make sure you check those things. All factories can and do produce lemons with respect to AK's, some more often than others.

    I would advise sticking with the fixed stock models if this is your first AK. The folding stock models are for use from vehicles and underfolders are not at all comfortable to shoot, which would be why Mark_Van_Goth added some paracord to his stock.
     
  16. TDS92A

    TDS92A New Member Supporter

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    I say go for it!

    There are several posts on here, both for and against, and they all valid. My first AKM was an Egyptian MAADI. No matter what I did to it, it would not hit the broad side of a barn until I put a scope on it which eliminated the iron sights. This was before all the Barbi accessories that has come out for the AKM's. I now own the WASR 10/63 fully blinged out and I consider it to be the best shooting rifle that I own.

    Follow the advice posted here about inspecting the rifle before you buy it. Even the inexperienced buyer can spot something wrong.

    Two things you will need to buy is a sighting tool and a Bore Sight for it. Average price is about $20.00 for the Sighting Tool and roughly the same for the Bore Sight, depending on the brand that you buy.

    Good luck!


     
  17. AFerree

    AFerree New Member

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    Could you know if the trigger will slap after you fire before buying it? And if it does is it fixable? I've head it can be quite a problem on you trigger finger.
     
  18. AFerree

    AFerree New Member

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    *will slap you after firing*
     
  19. dyslexic_llama

    dyslexic_llama New Member

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    The date on the trunnion (1971) is that of the original service rifle that was chopped into a kit.

    There's really no way that I know of to tell when it was reassembled for sale in the US, you could write Century and maybe ask based on serial number, they may be able to tell.
     
  20. hq357

    hq357 New Member

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    Just get an sks theyre more accurate and cheaper then an ak anyway