Reading the wind

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Squirrel_Slayer, Oct 11, 2010.

  1. Squirrel_Slayer

    Squirrel_Slayer New Member

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    This weekend I was doing some metal silhouette shooting at long range. Steel chickens at 200 meters with my ar, knock em down all day long. But then I would take shots at steel boars at 300 meters, and my elevation seemed to be completely inconsistent. Only one hit in every ten shots. The conditions I had where steady 10 mph tail winds gusting to 15. The 300 meter berm was positioned to where I had to shoot diagonally across three other berms.

    My question is has anyone had experience with varying up and down drafts eaffecting the elevation of a bullet to the extent of feet, not inches. Keep in mind that my loads are 69gr. .223 Rem moving over three thousand fps and my distance is only 300 meters.

    To say the least, it was something of a frustating day at the range yesterday.:mad:
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    yes, wind can greatly affect the flight of a bullet. especially if it is using terrain such as shooting over berms to magnify the effect. perception of the shooter over long distance can make inches seem like feet and yards. an experienced spotter or slapping up a very large piece of paper are about the only way to reliably judge the varience.

    just my 2 primer worth.
     

  3. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Heres an article regarding wind and elevation effects. The part about wind effecting elevation is about half way down in the article.

    Reading The Wind
     
  4. Davyboy

    Davyboy New Member

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    Wind

    A great friend of mine was a very accomplished sniper in a famous regiment with some amazing kills. His favourite saying was Shoot mark Shoot mark Shoot mark and trust your instincts
     
  5. Squirrel_Slayer

    Squirrel_Slayer New Member

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    MRM, thank you for giving me the link to that article. Being that you are from Sacramento as well, you may even know which range I was shooting on. The metal silhouette out at Sac Valley Gun Club. Set up on the left side of the benches and shooting at the boars. I had a spotter that is very inexperienced so that also played a role, but Jon also made a very valid point above. What looked like a terrible miss by feet at longer distance may have just been a miss by inches. Truthfully, I belive I was shooting right in between the legs of the boars and watching the splash behind the target which probably looked like a miss high to my spotter. Oh well, chalk one up to inexperience on both our parts. I did however print that article and I will study it well tonight and possible make some notes on my range card which is still in progress at this point. Thank you again for the help.
     
  6. gatopardo

    gatopardo New Member

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    I take a tree or bush as reference observe it for five minutes at least to establish a wind pattern, or so.

    Wind, even we don't see it has a mass, an it's indeed massive, it behaves just like water, it comes in waves pushes for awhile and then stops and then pushes etc.

    Your best chance is the moment it stops!

    When the wind goes over a wall or building it rolls over itself and the immediate effect on the ground is exactly opposite of what you'd expect given the wind direction.

    Just like the Ocean every place has a definitive wind pattern and it very much reverses at the change of seasons.

    I know it sounds complicated, but once you've spent some time watching "how the wind rolls' a that location, you own it. No bull:cool:

    If your range is in the4 dessert, get yourself some home depot plastic flags they'll help you "spot".

    Gatopardo
     
  7. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I've been shooting at the 1000 yard range with Nor Cal lately, actually a few practice sessions and their long range clinic they had last month. What I'm finding out is I can't always trust what my ballistic calculator is telling me for elevation dope especially beyond 500 or so yards. I keep records from everytime I shoot at each fireing line out to the 1000 yard line. What I record is the temperature, barrometric pressure, humidity, general conditions (sunny, partly cloudy, cloudy, etc..) and of course wind readings. Record elevation and windage I used for the shot that gets the closest to the X ring or in the X ring itself. I do find that I'm gradually using my recorded info more in similar weather conditions and it seems to be closer to being "on" than just relying on the ballistic calculator dope only. Past 300 yards or so the X ring is still somewhat elusive for me:D But I nail it once in awhile and am getting better the more I practice.

    The one thing with the winds at Sac. Valley, is that if you can nail the wind there, dealing with the wind most other places you may go to shoot will be easy.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2010