RE: iron musket balls

Discussion in 'Blackpowder & Musket' started by Skygee, Jul 23, 2011.

  1. Skygee

    Skygee New Member

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    Anyone know if there is any source of iron musket balls (modern-made; not antique)?
     
  2. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    don't you want lead? were iron ones ever made?
     

  3. sniper762

    sniper762 New Member

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    none ever made that i'm aware of. try ball bearings
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Musket balls were not iron- too light, too hard. Lead is the metal of choice for several reasons- ease of casting a round ball, softer than the iron or steel of my barrel, dense enough to retain energy over distance, plentiful, and CHEAP!
     
  5. Jo da Plumbr

    Jo da Plumbr New Member

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    I got your iron balls right here buddy. :D
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Jo da plumber is making funny (I'm sure). We are not a bad bunch here, but we do joke around a bit. Sometimes this can come across as azzholish. It is all in good fun.
     
  7. lotsoffreetime

    lotsoffreetime New Member

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    Ballistic Products has lead free roundballs for traditional muzzleloaders or smoothbore barrels
     
  8. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Try marbles instead.
     
  9. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Skygee
    we all here just like to hear ourselves type. Don't think we are know-it-alls(except for me-I do know it all). talk to us. what are you using them in? have you used them before? don't start a thread and then never come back on. for a cannon? muzzle loading musket? pistol? blunderbuss?
     
  10. Skygee

    Skygee New Member

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    Interesting...what are they made of?
     
  11. Skygee

    Skygee New Member

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    Sorry... I've seen mention of them with metal detectors finding iron musket balls. Someone said they are early Spanish origin.
     
  12. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    But, is there a reason you would prefer not to use lead?
     
  13. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Those aren't musket balls, they're case shot.
     
  14. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    AKA canister shot or grape shot
     
  15. lotsoffreetime

    lotsoffreetime New Member

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    they are made from Powder tungsten and Iron.It's called ITX roundball. It's from Ballistic Products Ballistic Products.com made in calibers 32 to 62 I assume it is made for all the lead free zones .
     
  16. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Grape would be too big to get confused with a musket ball.
     
  17. quigleysharps4570

    quigleysharps4570 New Member

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    Same thing I heard about them.
     
  18. attaunser

    attaunser New Member

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    Not true. Iron balls were used to some extent in the early matchlocks. They had big bores and were relatively short-ranged anyhow. Recently saw a fascinating TV documentary about the Inca. The earliest documented firearm kill in the New World is an Inca skull with a bullet hole about an inch in diameter. Analysis showed no lead, but did find particles of iron around the hole. Incidentally, some brave conquistidor shot the guy in the back of the head.:eek:
     
  19. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Interesting, got a link to the program?

    Not calling you a liar, but it doesn't make sense to fire an iron round from a steel barrel, at least not without one hell of a patch to get a seal. I could understand during the experimental phase of firearms development, but not later. Lead is HEAVY, relatively formable, and probably more common than quality iron even then. Or so it would seem to me, but i have certainly been wrong before. :)
     
  20. attaunser

    attaunser New Member

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    You are not calling me a liar; you just doubt that I am telling the truth:confused:
    The early cannon fired stone balls. Cannon fired iron balls until mid-19th century. Smooth bore small arms, especially military, fired very much undersized balls, lead or otherwise. How do you suppose they managed to "get a seal" all those centuries? Hint: they did not, for the most part, use patched balls.

    In re the program: There is no link; it was on cable TV. I think it was a NOVA prorgram, but would not swear to that for fear of being called a liar -- again.:D