Range shooting questions

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by wheelman, Jan 26, 2016.

  1. wheelman

    wheelman New Member

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    I'm new to both handgun shooting and shooting at indoor ranges. My first time shooting was ok, Shooting a S&W SW9VE I'm disapointed with the results even though Guy said wad good.Shot around 160 rounds and 12 total misses, first few all going left had to compensate Have a few questions ,

    #1- what is normal distance people shoot handguns at range? I was shooting max distance 15yds, thought was too close but saw others at 3&7 yards isn't that too close?

    #2-is there any type of rest for handguns to accurately check sight alignment , I feel guns shooting left and noticed sights off center .

    I am a perfctionist and will not be content with anything less than perfect , any and all advice is greatly appreciated
     

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  2. Dakota1

    Dakota1 Active Member

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    First off, you're doing well for a new shooter at 15 yards.

    People practice at 3 - 7 yards because that's where most defensive situations occur.

    If you want to bench rest to see where your sights are, rest your wrists, not the gun, on a shooting bag or anything that will give you a stable rest. Try it at 7 yards initially. When bench testing, you can't flinch & you must squeeze the trigger straight back (not easy at first). Not flinching comes with practice, so if your bench-rested shots are spread out at 7 yards, you're flinching or not pulling the trigger straight back. If you're doing it right, at that distance a 5-shot group should almost be one hole. Have an experienced shooter bench rest the gun if it isn't. If you're getting a tight group at POI (Point Of Aim) at that distance, you'll be pretty close to it at 15 yards. Also, keep in mind that different bullet weights will have different POI (Point Of Impact) and the difference will increase as the range increases. Usually, heavier bullets = higher POI.
     

  3. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    1. I routinely shoot from 7 yards to > 135 yards (plinking mainly)
    2. Don't go by the rear of the slide to see if the rear sight is aligned correctly. Is the gun sighted for you? No? Then sight it in.
    The idea is that the sights align with the barrel and where it shoots. A ding on the barrel crown could change the point of impact. Any it looks like you have a couple of dings on the slide.
    3. If you are accurate at 25 yards, then why wouldn't you be accurate at 7 yards?

    In other words, have fun shooting and don't over analyze.
     
  4. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    If hitting left move rear sight to right.
     
  5. Artbrownsr

    Artbrownsr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I'm a newby to hand guns myself but for self defense I believe that 15 yards is the max and the 3-7 yards are the normal range , remember in the house a long hallway can be 30' 10 yards a room is about 12-15 ' 4-5 yards a street or business establishment encounter maybe as close as you can touch and out as far as you can see and NOT ENDANGER SOME ONE ELSE!
    I saw another video of some one using a front sand bag for a handgun rest. Maybe a heavy duty video cam tripod with a solid plate on the pan and a sandbag to position in the right heighth .
     
  6. wheelman

    wheelman New Member

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    Just purchased the gun, second hand from a Store, was first time shooting . If you look at pics where headshots are was 15yds aiming dead center - I adjusted my aim rightward about an inch that's when the bullseye group started coming in.
     
  7. Allenvdb

    Allenvdb New Member

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    I'm not a perfect handgun shooter by any means but am fairly accurate out to 15-20 yards. I saw this chart the other day that I thought might help a little bit. Your accuracy is only gonna be as good as your technique from my experience when it comes to pistols since even little movement will affect where you are pointing. Good luck, hope this helps!
     

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  8. wheelman

    wheelman New Member

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    I do want to look into a trigger job, the SW9VE has no safety instead they built it with trigger requiring 12-14 pounds of pull, it's a bit much waiting for the gun to actually fire. Might play some part, but was getting great 1" groups at 15yds after adjustment of point of aim. Will see if can bench test it.
     
  9. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    I feel you'll be able to group better with it if you're not having to strain to pull the trigger. I'd strongly suggest you have the weight of the trigger lessened as S&W Sigmas are notorious for their extremely heavy triggers. Also sight alignment and trigger control go hand in hand. Those 2 things are probably more than 60% of what determines your effectiveness and grouping ability. When I teach somebody new to shoot, I tell them to balance a coin flat on the front sight, then pull trigger without the coin falling off until the striker/hammer drops. Once they are able to do that, we work on our speed. And after getting quicker and still grouping decently, we start on multiple targets and speed up more as they are capable of doing so. Remember those famous gunfighter words from the old west-take your time, in a hurry! I always treat every shot as if that's the only shot I'm going to get, whether it is gun or bow. Too many assume they can get it on the following shots if they don't hit it the 1st time, when it should be the other way around-the 1st shot is the BEST you're going to get, and possibly the only shot you'll get. Also I forgot to mention you need to train like you're possibly going to be shooting in deadly force justified situation. It does no good to be able to nail marbles at 50 yards if you can't handle & shoot faster at closer, more normal ranges.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
  10. wheelman

    wheelman New Member

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    I was shooting the 2 handed Weaver Stance, it was very cold plus took me some time to steady my hands, definitely something I need to work on but once got settled in, and adjusted for the leftward poi, I was pretty spot on, definitely think sights off some but will have checked before adjusting anything ,is a used weapon with some bumps & bruises yet working in good order for $199, sights can be replaced -mechanisms aew fine. Out of 160 plus rounds only 1 shell failed to fire & eject
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
  11. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The S&W 9VE has the most horrendous trigger of any S&W I have ever handled. With that said, the gun is plenty accurate for the intended use, defensive shooting on a budget.

    Proper hold, trigger finger placement and trigger manipulation will give satisfactory results. This is NOT a match pistol. It is designed to go bang every time and it does
     
  12. wheelman

    wheelman New Member

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    I'm not looking to be a competative shooter just have a perfection problem - anything less than excellent is unacceptable for me. Always been a dead on shot with every other firearm I've shot, I'll need some practice. Just nneed be able protect my family in an emergency
     
  13. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Then why did you purchase this S&W?

    It was designed as a "compromise".
     
  14. wheelman

    wheelman New Member

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    Because I'm not a wealthy man, was actually birthday gift(the$) and It's a quality firearm, besides the sights being off the gun has no problems and is built well. Made in USA.
     
  15. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I am not knocking your purchase.
    For the intended purposes it was designed and built for, it works.

    Not to perfection, but it works.

    When I was younger, I "gathered" guns. Now that I am older (and hopefully, wiser), I am very selective with my firearms purchases.

    If I had known then what I know now, my collection (different from "gathering") would have been totally different.
     
  16. wheelman

    wheelman New Member

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    The purchase process is a long one with multiple 60 mile drives back and forth to police headquarters and store, not to mention New Yorks exhorborant prices .. I always desired a revolver in .357 or .45 but can't afford the starting prices over $700 right now. eventually I will get another hopefully the one I want but for now, I have a good working gun to practice my marksmanship with as well as protect my home (with something smaller than a 12 gauge ) I rarely ever spend any money on myself, my girls come first, hopefully financial situation will improve in the future
     
  17. Balota

    Balota ... but I used to play keyboards.

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    There's never a downside to developing accurate, consistent shooting. Just keep in mind the size of your target in a self defense situation. High center chest area. Your bullseye dot for defensive shooting is about 4 to 5 inches diameter.

    Your stress level will cause some scatter, but if you consistently place shots in 2 inch groups in practice, you're "perfect enough".

    If you're already grouping that well, try shooting a little faster. Keep speeding up till your groups are up around 2 inches.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2016
  18. Magnum27

    Magnum27 New Member

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    You are new to shooting and talk about the 2 handed Weaver Stance? I think that you are doing ok.
     
  19. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    first of all, there is nothing wrong with wanting to do the best you can, but in all fairness, I think your expectations of the pistol may be more than it can deliver. fist of all the pistol wasn't designed to be a target pistol and asking it to be is asking for more than it can deliver. that pistol is designed to be reasonably accurate at close range and designed to go bang every time the trigger is pulled. It was designed to do all of that and be decently affordable and dependable. that it does.

    if you don't mind spending some money on a better trigger or a trigger job, better sights and maybe even a new barrel, then you might be able to increase it's accuracy factor to some degree.

    i'll bet if you start practicing at about 3-7 yards, you groups will tighten up quite a bit. by statistics, about 75% of most self-defense type shootings occur at 20 feet or less. that's 6.6 yards. give that a try. my personal longest distance I usually practice at is about 7 yards. I do practice sometimes at longer distances, but 7 yards is what I consider to be a practical distance to practice at for self defense type scenarios.