Racking the slide

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by Yunus, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    When I load a round in a semi-auto pistol, I pull the slide back and then release it, being sure to not slow the slide it as it loads. The only FTF's I have had on a Glock were when I did not do this. Is this true of most semi-auto pistols? I haven't had a chance to try this with my 1911 but wanted to get more information about this than just with my own pistols.
     
  2. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    You should load any pistol in this matter. allowing the slide to strip a round from the magazine as its intended to.

    hand loading on into the chamber and slamming the ejector against it will ultimately lead to ejector damage.
     

  3. jimbobpissypants

    jimbobpissypants New Member

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    I mostly use the slide release. I have been lucky enough to not have failures.
     
  4. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    be mindful that most manuals discourage the use of the "slide lock/slide catch" as a means to drop the slide. Most tell you to manipulate the slide rearward to release the catch.
     
  5. Mr. Bluesky

    Mr. Bluesky New Member

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    Huh, didn't know that. Will be releasing my slide by pulling it from now on.
     
  6. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    Is that to prevent wear and tear and a possible breakdown or increased likelyhood of failure in the slide lock?
     
  7. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    undue wear to both parts involved. It can round off the catch recess in the slide. as well as damage the catch itself.
     
  8. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    I strictly used the slide release on my Sig for years and years. After all, wasn't that what it was there for? :confused: Never had a problem and still don't to this day with the weapon. It never failed and it never failed to load a round from a mag.

    Then I started spending some time with my gunsmith and he showed me the differences on the inner workings and why it is better, overall, for the weapon and the reliability for you to pull the slide back and release it.

    There is nothing "wrong" with using the slide release, it isn't going to break your weapon. However the slide "pinch and pull" is a better overall option UNLESS you are in the middle of a gunfight, reloading an empty weapon & you need to get it back smoking in a hurry.

    You should be familiar with both options, IMO, as you just never know what conditions you could find yourself in under duress and possibility injured.

    Take a look at the guys that preach you being able to rack your slide on your belt, beltloop or even the heel of your boot if you are injured. You just never know. Even with a shot in the hand, you can probably reload and hit the slide release easily enough.

    Know your weapon, but don't just practice one way of going about things, because your world can change in a New York Minute....

    JD
     
  9. RomeoTango

    RomeoTango New Member

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    Using the slide lock to release the slide on a charged mag is good-to-go. It is what its designed for.

    Glock manual says either. Glock Manual 17, 17L, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24

    So does Kimber. http://pdf.textfiles.com/manuals/FIREARMS/kimber_1911.pdf


    This was a mantra that began with the fine vs gross motor skills debate.
    When was the last time you saw an auto with the slide stop lever/catch damaged from over use?
    ?
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2010
  10. jimbobpissypants

    jimbobpissypants New Member

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    I am aware that most manufacturers recommend not using the slide release. I am the type of person who does not "baby" my equipment. If I buy a piece of equipment, or tool, I'm gonna use all the gadgets, at least some of the time. In my opinion, if they didn't want me to use it, it wouldn't be on the gun.
     
  11. RomeoTango

    RomeoTango New Member

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    I can't find one manufacturer that recommends not using the slide release/stop.
    It's always been a training issue, someone correct me if I'm wrong (with appropriate documentation of course).
     
  12. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

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    Indeed, spoken for truth. I do it both ways, it just depends on how fast I need to be back on target when I am shooting.

    Jack
     
  13. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    any Glock manual for sure. thats the first place i saw it myself.
     
  14. RomeoTango

    RomeoTango New Member

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    From the Glock manual
    Glock Manual 17, 17L, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
     
  15. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    This is one valid reason. "Fine vs Gross" motor skill becomes very self evident under stress.

    But the main reason for pulling the slide to the rear (never "pinch and pull" between thumb and forefinger, always use the whole hand) is to capture the remaining recoil spring energy and increase inertia. Virtually every SA pistol has about 1/4" of rear travel left in the slide after the point where it is locked back by the slide stop. That 1/4" of spring pressure, coupled with the "flicking forward motion" of the strong hand can be enough extra "Oomph" to get a slide into battery on a pistol that may be dirty, or a round that may not want to chamber 100%.

    Slide velocity and inertia are your friends.
     
  16. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Really??

    Even though countless firearms trainers and instructors refer to "Pinch and Pull" when teaching newbs, especially when the weapon is hot?

    And what, praytell, was the source of "never" in that statement?? A link would be great.

    I don't disagree with your inertia arguement, but I would like to hear about why "never" was used.
     
  17. Mr. Bluesky

    Mr. Bluesky New Member

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    On what weapons of yours does the slide get too hot to touch? I don't pinch, but that's just because whole hand is easier.
     
  18. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    First off, did I ever say it was my weapon? During normal use? Never. During real training? Definitely.

    Hey Jack, what about you? Your weapon ever get hot to the touch?

    Secondly, since you asked. You ever run through a kill house? You ever spend 2 or 3 hours doing nothing but pistol drills?

    Weapons get hot. Adjustable sights are sharp, especially to untrained hands when you are teaching them how to shoot well early on. And anyone that says there is no such thing as "Pinch & Pull" as an instruction technique is full of it.

    JD
     
  19. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    You guys are all sissies. your supposed to drop the mag slam one home then take the sights and push them into the side of your thigh and rack the slide that way. Man none of you were ever taught that. Your instructors aren't very good. I learned that right after my ninja dad taught me how to jump over a car while engaging the bad guys with grandmas 22lr.
     
  20. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    While I respect your Ninja Father, I must say....

    Ninja Please! ( nods to Suprdave )

    If you had any skills, you would be counting rounds and would NEVER shoot a weapon dry. Hence the term "Tactical Reload".

    Learn it. Love it. :D