quick question plz help.

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by shootitout, Oct 13, 2011.

  1. shootitout

    shootitout New Member

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    Hay everyone I was just wondering do firing pins really break because of dry firing? Also dose keeping mags loaded damage there spring?
     
  2. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Up for debate with some people. It's generally considered not a good idea by many people to dry fire anything. As with many situations, you should contact the manufacturer.

    S&W says you can dry fire any of their revolvers except rimfires. The Ruger Mark III is supposed to be designed so that you can dry fire it, but I don't know.

    Really the manufacturer is the best way to address this question, and sometimes (as in the case of S&W) it's available on the manufacturer's website.
     

  3. fmj

    fmj New Member

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    I personally DO NOT dry fire anything if i can help it...i just dont see where its a good thing. If i am going to do dry fire practice/drills i will oad the chamber with a spent cartridge.

    As far as leaving mags. loaded i cant see where it can be a good thing to keepo springs compressed.
     
  4. vincent

    vincent New Member

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    Keeping mags loaded will not usually damage the springs, it's the actual use that wears on the springs. If storing a mag long term loaded, leave one or two rounds out just to be safe. Most manuals will tell you if dry firing is going to hurt your gun, worst case, call the manufacturer, snap caps are good too.
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    That's why I mentioned S&W. If you break it doing something approved by the company, they get to fix it.
     
  6. vincent

    vincent New Member

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    Ruger's pretty much the same, which is why I own 3 of them
     
  7. Poink88

    Poink88 New Member

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    I always use snap caps when dry firing. They are cheap insurance the way I see it but agree that best bet is to check with the gun manufacturer.

    I read that keeping mags loaded will not hurt the springs...unless you stress it beyond its limit (i.e. compressed more than it should like putting an extra round). General consensus is to keep the mag loaded one less than full. Just for extra safety margin but as designed, mags should be fine even when fully loaded. It is the cycling (compression and decompression) that damages the spring.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2011
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    the only firing pins that can break from dry firing are the ones that are on old revolvers where the pin is attached to the hammer.

    think about it like this: how much force is the firing pin subjected to when a round goes off as opposed to when its dry fired?? which do you think is exerting more force on the part??

    springs only lose their strength through work. sitting compressed or uncompressed does nothing to accelerate wear. only the compression/decompression cycle itself wears springs. if you want to wear out a magazine spring keep unloading it and loading it to let the spring "rest"
     
  9. tellmaster207

    tellmaster207 New Member

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    What I do & I'm no smith or pro.
    If it has an exposed hammer I dry fire it.
    If it has an internal I don't dry fire & use caps.
    I've never had a problem.

    Sent from my iPhone using FirearmsTalk
     
  10. Poink88

    Poink88 New Member

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    From what I've read, it is the spring or retainer pins that can break...not the firing pin. The firing pin or striker should only move forward so much...without the ammo to stop it, it will go further causing the problem(s).
     
  11. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    my sr9c manual says its safe to dryfire with an empty magazine inserted. but not without. i used to always dryfire my m16a2 and a4 rifles.

    mag springs i was unclear on too. i know we were told to empty them like once a month while overseas for a day or so to let them rest. but after reading this post i think i wont worry about it and just leave a couple rounds out
     
  12. EagleSix

    EagleSix New Member

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    ...well you sure know how to stir up a bucket of worms!!

    There is only one for sure way to safe guard against damaging your firing pin, from dry firing.......you know....don't do it. On the other hand, your firing pin could be damaged from shooting your gun, poor maintenance, or poor manufacturing! The reason, or cause of firing pins being damaged from dry firing are many, but basically what is the design of the firing pin, the design of the firing pin holder, and the quality of the pin material. These are all pretty difficult for us layman to determine or measure, so we are better at examining the history of a firearm design and consulting with the guy who makes it. For example, back in the 60-70's the firing pins in Star auto pistol were very weak and many broke from the repeated pounding of dry firing even when using a snap cap device. However I have dry fired 1911's, S&W 38 revolvers, AR-15, and many others, thousands of times without a firing pin failure.

    If you are concerned with a firing pin failure, and you should be, we all should be, checking the pin should be a part of your function check after cleaning. This doesn't assure the firing pin will not let you down when you most need it, but it may prevent you from using or carrying a gun, with a broken pin, in the event it broke on the last round you fired at the range. This has happened, I speak from experience!!!

    Spring design is a science industry all it's own, as I'm sure any of the engineers here will attest to. I have had failures from magazine springs left compressed for extended times. I have had magazine spring failures from springs I just plain wore out using them. I think it has more to do with the magazine spring compression design, the quality of the spring, and the maintenance. Springs are designed to be compressed and released.....that's there job, to provide flexibility, not static support (oh the engineers are going to jump on that one!). I don't think manufactures design magazine spring to fail, but I'm not convinced they all have done a good job of designing or using quality manufacturing either.

    If you compress a spring past it's design, I think we should expect some failure. And, if we use the spring, compressing and expanding, sooner or later I think a spring is going to wear out and fail. With that said, I haven't had too many problems either using or storing magazines lately......maybe they are making them better now, or maybe I finally am buying better quality magazines. Whether you leave your magazines loaded or empty, or partially full......and use them a lot.....they should give you a long service life.

    As others have already stated.....stick with the magazine you get the best service out of, and keep a couple or half dozen, new ready to replace those that fail or whenever you are suspicious of a pending failure.

    The average shooter probably has 2-3, maybe 5 magazines for their gun. I have that many dozen magazines for each gun. Magazine are no kidding matter.....they are the feed supply that offer the advantage of using or carrying that auto-loader.

    Anyway.....nothing above scientific.....just the opinion of an Old Redneck.
     
  13. tellmaster207

    tellmaster207 New Member

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    Honestly whenever the whole firing pin thing comes up I always get a little paranoid. Almost like a jinx thing. It's duck season & you watch no BANG.

    Sent from my iPhone using FirearmsTalk
     
  14. ChicagoJoe

    ChicagoJoe New Member

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    The rule of thumb I learned years ago was never dry fire a rimfire without a snap-cap or spent cartridge in battery and it is fine to dry fire a center fire but a snap-cap is good insurance.
     
  15. 007BondJamesBond007

    007BondJamesBond007 New Member

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    My Ruger Single Six, Buckmark, Marlin 795, Beretta 92FS manual say no dry fire.

    My Kimber S&W, say it is ok. Check your Manual.