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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1925 and a 1943 Mosin. Both were made in the same factory but you can see some dramatic differences in the two with regard to how they were manufactured. In '43 the Russians were said to have cranked production up to close to 100,000 guns per week.

The '43 receiver markings are a lot more plain. Also, a lot of tool marks on barrel and receiver. The Russians had decided on a round receiver for easier production back in 1938. My '43 also turned out to have a split stock that I was working on repairing when I took the pictures.


The '25 has much nicer markings, and smoother machining.



A better view of how severe the tool marks are on the 1943 receiver. Also note that the side scalop is missing from the left side of the receiver, making it a "high wall" The stripper clip guide area is also only machined for ther essential slot for stripper clips. The tail of the receiver is also not tapered off on the sides like the 1925.


The 1925 model has a machined front sight ring, while the 1943 has a metal stamping that is welded to the sight base.



More stock markings on the 1925, and you can hardly see the stock repair to the heel from this side.


The 1925 also has stars stamped into the barrel bands, that the 1943 does not have.
 

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It's very possible your 1925 was re-arsenaled, at some point.

Pre- 1930s (the 91-30 model) originally had an unhooded front

sight blade.

The Barrel bands on the pre 1930s are solid, not sprung. They also came with

a slightly different stock, to fit them. IIRC, the older finger guard was reversable,

in essence, the same, front and back.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's very possible your 1925 was re-arsenaled, at some point.

Pre- 1930s (the 91-30 model) originally had an unhooded front

sight blade.

The Barrel bands on the pre 1930s are solid, not sprung. They also came with

a slightly different stock, to fit them.
Pretty sure you're right. My stock has some indicators that it may have been a dragoon stock. I had a Finn captured 91 (Pre -91/30) that was an excellent shooter, had a Tikka barrel. Man, that thing was long.
 

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I have a 1925 Izzy, but it was re-arsenaled.

It's got all original serials, but the hooded sight,

and a 91-30 stock and barrel bands. I imagine, prior to deep

storage, post WWII, many of these rifles were rebuilt

to a uniform standard, which included the hooded sight,

and a new stock. But many Russian military procedures

are shrouded in secrecy to this day. Sometimes the only

clues to what was done to these guns is the rifles themselves.


It's got solid rifling, and I anticipate firing some

good quality ammo through it.
 

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In the 20s the Soviets had time to make nicely finished guns. I really like the older ones. By '43 the only need was to turn them out as quickly as possible, and still retain function. Polishing went by the way-side to save a few minutes per rifle. At one time the Soviets were losing over 200,000 rifles per month.
 
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