Questions for bear hunters.

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by txpossum, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    I have a question for the bear hunters here. This one is not about what is the best firearm for defense from bears, but rather how the practical aspects of attempting to kill a bear would vary with the type of weapon. For instance, I have read that it's better to try to shoot an attacking bear in the shoulder or hip joint, crippling them and stopping their speed of attack before trying for a kill shot. Okay, this might work with a high power rifle, but with, say, a .44 magnum? I wouldn't think it had enough power. How about a .30-30?

    I've also read that with a handgun a shot must penetrate the brain or the spinal column. How thick is a bear's skull? Where would you aim?

    With a shotgun, which would be best, slugs or something like 00 buckshot? Once more, where is the best aiming point -- joint, skull, heart?

    Now, mostly I am talking about grizzly or brown bears, but if this differs with black bears, how?
     
  2. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

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    Well, I'm not a bear hunter, but we used to hike all over bear country when I was younger. I was told to aim high on the upper shoulder, or just below the nose and expect your gonna slam the trigger under stress and the round is gonna go low and hit the vitals.

    image-1164835876.jpg

    Here's the actual shot placement. Which is where I'd be aiming. I'm a stone cold killa. I don't slap no triggers. ;) I was also told to spray first and draw down for if he breaks through the cloud of bear spray because a pistol vs a bear is a very bad deal and the spray works way more often than a gun.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2013

  3. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    bears have a totally different blood count than humans, so although a heart/lung shot will kill a bear, sometimes it takes them a while to realize they are dead. You want to take out the front shoulder as you shoot into their vitals so it will slow down in its movements to not get away or get to you before you can fiinish it off.
    A charging bear a head shot would be pure luck if you stopped it, their skulls are thick and sloped so much that the bullets would generally richochet off before they could penetrate into the brain.
    Buck shot is useless unless you can shoot it in its mouth and break its jaw but he still will have his claws to do you serious harm or death.
    The inuit will hunt polar bears with a 223 and do side shots in the head to kill them, but they also are generally in a kayak to get up close and get away faster than they can swim. On land you would be crazy to try that.
     
  4. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    Try a search and you can find days worth of reading on the subject.
     
  5. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    If I was purposefully hunting a bear I would do it with my 458winmag using 520 grain softpoints at 2100fps. Aimpoint would be to the heart lungs while going through a shoulder to get there.

    Buckshot is useless for bears. It will just lodge under the fat lay in the muscle and piss it off more than it naturally is capable of being.

    While bears have been killed with handguns its not wise or ethical to purposefully do so

    If your hunting a bear take a gun big enough to humanely kill the beast.
     
  6. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    Thanks for those words. Great post.:D
     
  7. phideaux

    phideaux Active Member Supporter

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    Humanely means ...death as quickly as possible.
    If you dont kill it humanely...He will kill you VERY inhumanely slowly.



    Jim
     
  8. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Buck shot.....................

    Not meant to kill, only to deter the bear from ripping you too shreds. A frontal head shot with 18 5/16 dia. pellets to the nose and eyes will stop the bear for a second, hence the second round of buck shot and follow up with a slug or two if you are still living and not being ripped to shredds by 5 inch claws from a pissed off bear................Young bears will retreat, old bears don't give a sh$t, just like in the human male spiecies..............lol...............:D
     
  9. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    I have shot a bear with a bow , there anatomy is quite different than other animals , a shoulder shot is to far forward . Their lungs are high and back and the heart is low and back . This similar area in a deer would be a gut shot . I put a broadhead in one and I thought I had shot it back a bit far . Upon field dressing it I had a perfect heart shot . Lemme tell you one thing a bear will always know something is wrong when they come in , they will know you are some where in that area even though they may not know exactly where you are and may not be able to see you . They are very sketchy , and observant. You however will NEVER , I mean NEVER out run a bear . The one I shot went through the heart and he still went about 50 yards full steam and within seconds of being shot was out of my sight . I have some video some where as I videoed this hunt . There are alot of anatomy pics out there that are just plain wrong and most of them have the internals to far forwards . This is probably the best one out there that represents the vitals in the right spot on a black bear. The lungs are directly above the heart and go back about mid way of the open area


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2013
  10. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    If attacked by a Grizz your choice of fire arms is not likely an issue. In all the attacks I am familiar with they were by surprise. The attack was fast powerful and disabling. The rifle was lost during the first pass by the bear. In two attacks hand guns carried high across the chest saved the victim from dying. In one instance a fellow hunter shot the sow 5 times with a .270 at about 3 feet. In all instances the victims underwent months of very expensive surgery and healing. One fellow has spent over $300,000 and is not yet healed. :(
     
  11. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Timid bears...................

    Even black bears steer clear of the big brown boys and girls. Climb a tree to exit the bruins, but not the blacks...........A crippled bear is like a human being on drugs. Don't stop shooting till the threat is over or, you are food for thought.................Man I love me some human meat with gun smoke and peppery spray..................:eek:;)
     
  12. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    will the last line as funny. All spiced up and ready to eat. ha.
     
  13. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What I want to know is when you kill one, do you then eat it?
     
  14. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    Yup , I had summer sausage made and a few seasoned roasts , the roasts are kinda dry but the summer sausage was excellent
     
  15. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    What if a person is attacked by a rapist or a murderer and kills the threat. The victim ends the threat with lethal force. Do they eat the remains of the attacker? What a stupid F'ng question. Only an Urban Liberal would ask something that ignorant. :rolleyes:
     
  16. gmaster456

    gmaster456 New Member

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    Yes because a brown bear is the same thing as a rapist.
     
  17. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

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    If you shoot a bear or any other animal in self defense, often times DWL takes the animal as part of their investigation so there is no way you can eat it.

    As far as shooting a bear for food people have been eating bear meat for thousands of years. I found it to be tough and stringy. But I've only had it once. And id be willing to bet I could cook it up nice and tender. Wild game needs some tender southern lovin to reach its full potential.
     
  18. magnumman

    magnumman New Member

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    I have eaten bear several times and never really cared for it. It's like the big game version of squirrel IMO.

    I had a professor in college who killed a griz in self defense in Alaska, a bunch of game commissioners loaded the thing and hauled it off. They told him they always take the animal to prevent poachers from shooting an animal then calling it in as SD and taking off with the hyde (or meat if you can stomach a bear)
     
  19. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

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    With some good tender southern lovin, squirrel can come out delicious.

    Coon, squirrel, and even possum when properly aged and properly prepared will give pork or chicken a long hard run for their money.

    I'd be willing to bet if I had a fresh bear roast cut off and handed to me, I could age it in ice for about 4 days with the plug pulled on the ice chest. Then bore some 3/4 holes to the center and put my medium-large game tenderizer and seasoning in there and slow cooked it in a roux or gravy it would fall apart like every other tough game I've cooked. If it didn't, I'd repeat the process the next time except instead of the holes I'd slice it into steaks, tenderize it, let it marinade in my game marinade for 24-48 hours and A) grill it by searing both sides at a high temp and then cook it slow and low to medium rare. Or B) double batter it in Italian bread crumbs and parm cheese and deep fry it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2013
  20. 304inc

    304inc New Member

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    Agreed, also testing for disease if animal acted crazy...