Questions about M1 Garand

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Trez, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    so a friend of a friend is selling a IHC M1 garand. ive always wanted one because i like to collect war guns and its made by my favorite auto company (besides it would look good in my international truck or scout)
    i have some questions...
    how much is it worth?
    does the m1 really eject the clip and make a "ping" sound when empty?
    what is "garand thumb" and how do i avoid it?
    besides the receiver being marked "International Harvester" is there any other markings that would identify it or to make sure all the parts are correct?
    last, awhile back i was reading a forum and they were talking about a cut operating rod... whats the difference? and if the rod is cut does it affect the rifle?
    thanks in advance....
     
  2. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    Yes, the clips eject and "Ping".
    Garand Thumb can be avoided by keeping tension on the oprod with the edge of your hand while loading a fresh clip. And by getting your thumb out of the way quickly. Pay attention.
    Some oprods were cut (demilled) and later re-welded. Quality varies on them from "serviceable" to "shards of flying shrapnel everywhere".

    Ideally, it would have no import marks on it.
    It would be all original.
    It would have a low Throat Erosion and Muzzle Wear.

    Our very own WJKulek is one of the world authorities on the M1. Maybe he will be along to help you determine the provenance of the M1 in question...
     

  3. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    well i had a m1

    i had gotten a m1 garand, but the op rod was bent and the guy traded me back.. well even though it was broken im missing the m1. i still want it but the guy wants a fourtune for it. it was a springfield made in Jan. 1944 and still had the original barrel marked SA 1-44, from what i have read is very rare for a m1.
    from what i could tell all but 3 parts were from the correct era, everything was marked with a "12" except for the follower arm, the lower stock was birch, and it had a international trigger assembly (and now the op rod). shooting a single shot at a time it was extremely accurate. i ran 2 clips this way before i returned it. what would this gun be worth?
    any other ways to get a m1? gun shops in the area dont have any, and when they do there allways over a $1,000 for nothing special. ive never bought a gun sight unseen so i would be unsure about getting one online.
    ive thought about the cmp but i am very picky, and eather want a WWII Springfield or a 1950's International Harvester, and for sure not a mixmaster M1. the cmp doesnt give you a choice, does it?

    to be honest the m1 the guy had was the most original one ive seen, but i feel he wants to much for it :(
     
  4. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    What does he want for it? A bent oprod can be fixed, and was probably caused by firing commercial .30-06 instead of M2 spec. And if you don't want to fix it, buy a new oprod.
     
  5. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    how do you fix the op rod?? he wants a 1,000 for it, which i wouldnt mind, but i would want to replace the non-period parts with the correct ones and i priced that at about 300-400 bucks... would a all correct m1 be worth 1,400? i guess that would answer my question better? :confused:
     
  6. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    all correct m1s are rare because most are refurbished or repaired in the field with random parts.

    gunbroker is a good place to find specific pieces.

    what its worth is what your willing to pay. if your buying as an investment i would strongly suggest haunting every pawn shop you can find to see if you can find a deal. buying a collector piece from a collector will seldom be a good investment.

    if your buying it to shoot it who cares if its random parts long as it functions. spending lots off effort and money in making a correct parts gun just to use it as a shooter is in my opinion not a good idea when its easier and cheaper to get a random part shooter.
     
  7. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Im selling the guns i was gonna trade him, im sure some cash would sway him. So what would be a desent price to offer him? I see m1's on gunbroker going from $700+ and the cmp charges $600+ anyways, is it worth the extra $$$ for this one?
    True, but just cause i want a m1 bad, i doesnt mean i wanna get hosed...
     
  8. Wambli

    Wambli New Member

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    Buying a Garand is an artform. You can pay $700 for one worth $500 or $1,000 for one worth $2,000 and the differences are subtle. Matching numbers and manufacturer stamps are good so are good original barrels with good crowns and throats and stocks with original cartouches and no import marks. Refinishing at home is the big no-no but arsenal refurbishes are Ok. It all adds up. For your first a rack grade CMP is a great way to start until you do your homework. For many that is all they are ever going to want anyway.
     
  9. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    i agree. condition is everything. do a ton of research and know before you buy. since your asking here if its a good deal that tells me you havent done enough research yet.

    make sure you at least get a muzzle gauge. while the muzzle wont tell you the condition of the throat its a good indicator of overall bore wear and its faster than throat gaging.

    even if everything elses matches up a worn barrel sinks the price a lot.
     
  10. Thomas Carey

    Thomas Carey New Member

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    CMP is a good way to guy. I have talked to more than one person that has ended up with a higher grade gun than they expected.
     
  11. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the help guys! i think i desided that if i can get it for between $600-$800 ill buy it.
    All the shops in town want $1,000+ just cause its a Garand (if they even have one). the cmp charges $500-$600 for field grade m1's, "correct" m1's are $1,100
    Field Grade Rifles. Most of these rifles have been refinished or rebuilt at least once while in military service and will likely have some parts from other manufacturers. Fair to good condition. Rifle wear will be exhibited by worn and mixed colors of the finish; there may be some minor pitting on the metal parts; wood will be basically sound but may be well used with minor hairline cracks, and many dings, scratches and gouges; wood may not match in color, type of wood or condition. These rifles may have some foreign parts and wood may be Walnut, Birch, Beech or other variety. Rifles do not have import marks. Bores will be generally good with only minor imperfections; the barrel crown may be nicked, and the muzzle may gauge more than “3” on muzzle gauge. The Throat Erosion will gauge less than 5 – well within US Army standards. Do not expect rifles in mint condition in this grade.

    Manufacturer selection only guarantees the receiver was produced by the manufacturer listed. The barrel and the other parts may have been produced by other manufacturers. Rifles of all grades are packed for shipment purely by "luck of the draw".
    that description doesnt really sound all that great for $500-$600, i would have to join a club (costs $100 a yr.), wait 3 months, and i dont get any choice. if i have to spend $600-$700 anyways, another couple of hundred bucks doesnt seem that bad to get a WWII era one with at least some matching parts.
    as for barrel wear what about accuracy? i shot 15 out of 16 shots into a 2 liter bottle and it was the first time i ever shot a m1 (i missed with the first shot) i did the muzzle test using a 30-06 round i read on the web and it was better than the pics i seen. i ordered a muzzle wear gauge so ill check that before i buy... whats considered a good muzzle wear number? the field grade from the cmp says they are more than 3 and may have nicked crowns. (the one i want has a great looking crown)
    Anything im missing??? like the 1911, information on the M1 can be overwhelming and confusing.......:confused:
     
  12. Wambli

    Wambli New Member

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    Actually I have owned some collector grade Garands and I ended up selling them. The last one, an all matching H&R just went to a good friend that has an extensive collection of US Military guns. I also sold him a last month of production Remington US Model 1917 in unissued condition. He was thrilled to death but to me these guns meant very little. Unless you are trully a collector there is not enough difference between a collectible or a shooter to really appreciate it.

    My next (and last) Garand will be a rack grade with a good receiver. I will then switch out all the parts that are worn with good new parts and add a nice Match barrel to it. The whole thing will get refinished and a new stock from Boyd's. In essence I'm taking a no-collector value gun and refurbishing to like new out of the Armory condition for my own personal enjoyment. It'll look like the day it left the factory in the 40's. THAT Garand I'll keep...
     
  13. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I got one just to shoot. There's great range in a popular caliber, a handsome classic appearance,and it's semi. IMO,
    a lot to like.

    I may get another one.(just to shoot)

    I guess it all depends on what your personal preferences are.

    I saved the wood stock, but I tried a synthetic stock, and with

    the bluing or parkerized finish gone, it looks good. Kind of like the original

    "black rifle".:cool:
     
  14. armsmaster270

    armsmaster270 New Member

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    The M-1 op rod is suppose to be bent, do you mean bent past the normal?
     
  15. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    What do you mean by "bent"?
     
  16. armsmaster270

    armsmaster270 New Member

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    Per FM23-5
    Caution: The operating rod is bent intentionally
    so that it will not bind against the
    enlarged portion of the barrel. Do not attempt
    to straighten it.
     
  17. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    what else would cause a m1 not to shoot but not cycle?
     
  18. 007BondJamesBond007

    007BondJamesBond007 New Member

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    You can get a M1 at North Store - Camp Perry allot cheaper You need to be a member of a club. You can check out the web site for eligible clubs.
     
  19. armsmaster270

    armsmaster270 New Member

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    Send me your E-Mail and I will send you a PDF file on the Garand FM23-5

    16. Stoppages
    a. A stoppage is any unintentional interruptionin the cycle of operation.
    b. Most stoppages occur because of dirty, worn,or broken parts, and lack of lubrication. The rifleman must be taught to watch for these defects and take corrective action to eliminate them
    before they cause a stoppage. Some of the more common stoppages, with their usual causes and remedies, are shown in table II (para 19). Note that the stoppages are classified according to the steps of the cycle of operation.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2011