Questions about building precision 10/22

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by Ruzai, May 25, 2011.

  1. Ruzai

    Ruzai New Member

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    I'm looking to build a 10/22 to fill several purposes, open competition, fun, and maybe a little vermin thining. I've already got my fun gun 10/22 but I'd like a 22lr that can say to hell with tacks and drive pins. So I've got a few questions I'd like others to weigh in on.
    I want to develop the build around 2 particular factory loads, all high-velocity from CCI so my first question is this, what is the optimum twist rate and length of a bull barrel for a 22lr bullet traveling between 1200 and 1450 fps?
    The three CCI loads are the following:
    Velocitor 40 grain CPHP 1435fps @ muzzle
    AR Tactical 40 grain CPRN 1200fps @ muzzle
    Select 40 grain LRN (this is just in case there's a shortage on AR Tactical, they're mirror image rounds by the looks of it save the copper plating)
    Excluding human error the barrel and ammo match are the heart of accuracy in a rifle, so I figure its a good place to start.
    So can anyone give me any information or suggestions on good barrels and the length and twists?
     
  2. natman

    natman Member

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    If you want to get serious about accuracy, you're starting with the wrong ammo. Using good match ammo will improve your accuracy before you even start changing the gun.

    1:16 is the near universal twist rate for 22LR and you will be hard pressed to find a different rate because it works.

    Barrels? Green Mountain, Volquartsen, Lilja - there are a lot of good 10/22 barrels out there, it's just limited by how much you want to spend.

    Get good ammo with a good barrel, a good trigger and bed the action in the stock and you'll get an amazing improvement in accuracy over stock. After that you'll be chasing after ever diminishing returns.

    Try RimfireCentral.com - Rimfire Community! for way more information than you want to know about making a 10/22 accurate.
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2011

  3. Ruzai

    Ruzai New Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions, I want to try and iron out every detail before I actually build the gun. I've always found CCI 22lr, especially the Velocitor to be pretty accurate, what would be a good place to start looking for match ammo?
     
  4. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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  5. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    In my experience, Lilja & Hart make the 2 best barrels for drop in 10/22. You've going to pay for them but you get consistency of .0001 and they come already hand lapped. Both of them are 1-16 twist with a finished length of 21".

    RWS R50 and Eley Benchrest Gold have been my 2 top performing ammo with Federal Ultramatch and Wolf MT coming close. You'll likely want a rim thickness gauge to measure & sort by rim thickness.

    You'll need to drop it in a good stock & bed it. I prefer Acraglas Gel from Brownells.

    If I was you I'd mill the boltface to .043 rim thickness and radius the back bottom of the bolt for easier hammer reset with target (subsonic) ammo. If you need more detail or have questions fire away.
     
  6. Ruzai

    Ruzai New Member

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    I guess I am expecting a bit much to think Velocitor and AR Tactical rounds to perform outstanding results by just looking at statistics but the Velocitor is what I plan to use if I need to do pest control. Lapua and Eley look like they can be pretty accurate on their own so I'll have to get a hold of some of it when I finish the build.

    Is it better to free float a barrel or bed it? Most of the stocks I see by just glancing through the options for stocks are free float designs. Which is a better process accuracy-wise?

    I did plan on getting a rim-thickness gauge, got that on my tool wish list.
    Can you explain why I'd need to mil the boltface to .043 rim thickness? I can do it, I just dont know why is all :confused:
     
  7. safedman

    safedman New Member

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    I have found the 10/22 I built from scratch actually likes Federal Target, 325 round boxes for $14.00 at Wally World, made for semi autos so less powder fouling. At 25 yards it will shoot 1 hole, at 50 it will open up to .5 to a little over .5 inches.
    I have a Clark Custom Barrel, Clark Custom trigger job that breaks at 2.5 lbs with no creep. All the internals are standard Ruger with a Boyd Fire and Ice stock. PM me and when I return to the home 20 I will send you pics.
    It cost around $600 to build but it is a blast. At 25 yards I shoot the small air soft ammo off of golf tees without hitting the T. No Bull. :)
     
  8. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    Nothing wrong with your ammo choices, but be aware that 22 rimfires can
    be picky. If you want the best accuracy that the gun is capable of, you
    will need to try a wide variety of brands/loads and find what it likes. Then
    go buy all of that load/lot number that you can find.

    Don't be surprised if what YOUR gun likes isn't the high dollar match ammo.
    It could be bulk pack cheap stuff.
     
  9. Nicodemus

    Nicodemus New Member

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    Just for $hits and giggles, try some CCI Standard Velosicity and see how it prints. ;)
     
  10. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    Milling the boltface to .043 rim depth will minimize headspace. It leaves less "wiggle" room for the ammo in the chamber. My experience has proven that milling the bolt will give a slight edge in accuracy. Also I've noticed that the finished rifle will tend to like the bulk ammo a bit more-not as much as match ammo but better than with the factory setup.




     
  11. natman

    natman Member

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    You need to decide what you want this gun to do. If you want a reasonably accurate varminter that's one thing. If you want to "drive pins" that's quite another.

    It's best to float the barrel. On 10/22s, especially with a bull barrel, it's best to bed the first inch or so of the barrel so that the heavy barrel isn't hanging off of the aluminum receiver.
     
  12. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    This is what we use and like very much in our match rifles at our monthly shoots at the gun club (first photo). The next photo is what we would use if we could afford it.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Ruzai

    Ruzai New Member

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    That makes sense, thanks for clearing that up Stalkingbear.

    Natman, first and foremost I want it to have the best accuracy I can get. I can deal with standard velocity ammo if that's what prints best.

    I gave a look at Lilja barrels and they look very promising. No cool fluting? :rolleyes:
    I'm kidding obviously, I'll take accuracy over looks on this project so aeshtetics take a backseat. Still looking at options just to see what pops up.
    I found a pre-smoothed bolt with internal firing pin, but it is case hardened, which means if I work on it I have to either re-case harden or speical order it.
    Do you think I'd be better off working on an original cast-bolt and smoothing the surfaces my self or would that through off tolenrences too much?

    Edit: Tony KID products keep poping up and I'm thinking about starting with one of their recievers and maybe the 20" bull barrel, but not sure yet. Any opinions on their products?
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2011
  14. natman

    natman Member

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    Then forget about Velocitors and the like and concentrate on finding match ammo that your rifle likes.

    I would suggest a barrel, a trigger and a stock. Put that together and then see how it shoots. Then if you still want more accuracy, try internal changes one by one to learn what works.
     
  15. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Kidd products are GREAT, I have the same barrel you're talking about, a Kidd trigger, and I think I'm getting a Kidd receiver for my berfday. Kidd is all over the place down here in my neck of the woods. Really fine products.
     
  16. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

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    10-22

    built a few float the barrel work on the trigger try differnt ammo the most expensive is not always best
     
  17. Ruzai

    Ruzai New Member

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    I really like the KIDD trigger's adjustability, I havent gotten to do much work on my factory trigger group yet. I may just start by buying a KIDD trigger group for my current 10/22 and swaping out when I actually get the new rifle put together.
     
  18. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

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    10-22

    clark custom has a good group hammer sear trigger for about 60.00 if you wany to go all out volquriskin 200+ but exalant i have both and id go clark to start takes pull down to about 4 lb but with a noticable let off but works good when your use to it
     
  19. rifleman55

    rifleman55 New Member

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    10-22's are great rifles, the main problem with them is the cost to really get them to shoot. It's pretty easy to spend $800 to $1000. for a real tac driver.
    I know, I have one and have spent a lot of money on it.

    I bought a Savage BRJ, had it accurized for $225.00 by SavageGunsmithing.
    I have maybe $600. max into it and it will outshot every 10-22 I've seen. Someone with $1000. or more may give it a run for the money, but that's a lot of ammo or a very good target scope.
    I shoot Wolf MT, it likes it the best and is an inexpensive match ammo.
    I shoot .1" groups on a very regular basis (in decent shooting conditions), 5 shots @ 50 yds and about 5 weeks ago, I shot a perfect 5 shot group @ 50 yards, .222".

    No saying the Ruger is not a fine rifle, only pointing out there are alturnitives, for less Money and it's something different, which is something I like.
    Many people buy the TR model as it's more of a benchrest stock.
    Go to Savages web site and look at all they offer. All heavy barreled models are the same with the exception of the stocks.

    One last reason. If you have a problem with a Ruger and it's been modified, Ruger will remove all non stock parts or refuse to work on it, Savage does not care, they will repair a problem and unless something is unsafe, leave your modifications alone. I have also found Savage to give the best customer service of any gun company.

    Just something to chew on, John K
     
  20. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    I think the OP was asking about 10/22s-not Savage.