Question gas piston M14 or M1A

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by Last Crow, Aug 26, 2009.

  1. Last Crow

    Last Crow New Member

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    Last time I fired my M1A it filed to eject. I cleaned the gas piston as to Springfield recommendations. The piston has some pitting on the outside and end of piston. Springfield does not say replace piston if pitted. I checked the OD of piston. All measurements where there was no pitting were .497. I measured the area where the pitting is there and are no high spots. If anything it could be 1/5 of a thousandth small. I can’t see that this would cause any problems. I would not want to score the cylinder walls, as this would be well over a $100 fix. I do not want to replace gas piston if not necessary, it is over $50. Any thoughts, thanks.
     
  2. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    I'm sorry brother - I love to help in these situations, but this is just outside anything resembling my area of expertise. :(

    In my total time in the shop, we have had ( 2 ) M1A's that wandered in and both left with the person who brought them by. :eek:

    Forum Member needs HELP over here!!!

    JD
     

  3. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    What about cleaning it up with some fine emory cloth? What kind of shape is the recoil spring in? How's the ejector and the extractor look?

    If it's the piston, there's one for $22. here: M14 Parts
     
  4. 753X0

    753X0 New Member

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    That shouldn't bother it.
    With the bolt locked to the rear is the piston free to move in the cylinder? Does it slide from front to back as you elevate the muzzle to the ceiling and then turn it down towards the floor?
    You should hear the piston sliding back and forth making a smacking noise as it hits each end.
    Also +1 on what CA357 said.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2009
  5. Last Crow

    Last Crow New Member

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    Thanks for the link. I only checked one place on the Internet and it was $50.
    When I took off the gas plug I had to use a little force to get the piston out. So I’m sure the gunk on the piston was the problem. I used 3M Scotch Brite (green scuff pad) and bore solvent to clean the piston. The piston moves fine in the cylinder now.
    I’ll be seeing a gunsmith who is an expert on M1’s, who also owns a M14 on Sept 13 and 14. See what he has to say, but for $22 for a good used piston. I may just buy it.
    I used an M14 in the Army but we never cleaned the gas piston.
     
  6. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Last Crow, I have it's older brother, a '43 M1 Springfield Garand. I love these rifles. :D