Question for the former and current Marines

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by kfox75, Feb 1, 2012.

  1. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

    7,315
    272
    83
    As some of my previous posts have stated, My dad is a retired Marine (E-9 after 22 years). For the last 2 years I have been debating getting a tatoo to honor my father and have designed one with the Marine Corps. insignia as the center peice, with dog tags with the years he went in and retired below it with his final rank in the middle of the two. I would like to do this in black and gray shading, no color.

    My question is this. Would it be improper, me being a former depenent never having served, for me to get this piece done? Should I instead get a photo of him in his dress blues? Would I upset or offend any members of the armed forces by doing this, or would it be a good way to honor dad? Your responses are appreciated, and thank you for your service.
     
  2. yazul42

    yazul42 Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    1,320
    12
    38
    When I was in the service back in the mid 70's, the public's view of the U.S.M.C. and the military in general, was a little less appreciative than it is today. Many servicemen and women who were just as heroic in their duties as those today were more maligned than celebrated. Your desire to honor your father's service is admirable. You may wish to ask him about the tattoo,he probably has some good input. The Top may surprise you in his response, but I would consider his wishes before proceeding,, he will most likely tell you it was his duty and not want any fuss,,, honor and modesty tend to walk hand in hand at times. Ask your father.

    Good luck,
    Jeff
     

  3. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    I would ask him too. Me personally, I wouldn't be offended a bit, and I think it sounds like a great tattoo idea. One thing though, is there likely would be some young devil nuts who will be offended. You simply can't please everyone all the time.

    I think an "in honor of" statement, or something to that effect will immediately remove most potential for offense. And if someone gives you a hard time, tell them Trip, from 1/6 Deathwalkers says it's okay :)
     
  4. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

    2,992
    2
    0
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
  6. pfev1980

    pfev1980 New Member

    223
    1
    0
    I think as long as you don't plan on joining the Marines in the future...drill instructors take USMC tats kind of personally...and you put something that kind of points out that it's a dedication, more obvious than the dates on the tags I mean, you should be fine. If you are thinking of joining yourself, wait till after boot camp,
     
  7. XxChino13xX

    XxChino13xX New Member

    382
    0
    0
    Bahaha, I haven't heard that in so long.

    I agree with talking to your father about what you are looking to do with the tattoo. And I like the 'In Honor Of' idea, that would look nice.

    If you have a photo editor or Microsoft word, see if you can put it together and see what it would look like. That might help with the decision.
     
  8. chewchew

    chewchew New Member

    274
    0
    0
    It's all good that you want to honor your father that way, but a lot of ex Marines would argue the point, and the point being that you must earn the right to permanently represent yourself as a member of an honorable branch of service that can only be accomplished by going through the hardships to earn the right to be called a real Marine.
    I'm an old squid, ( one step above a jarhead)...but I would feel the same way if my son wanted to have USN tattoed on him. If you want to honor your father, just be a good son and tell him you're proud of his service to our country.
     
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,453
    587
    113
    Not a former Marine, but retired Army, and FATHER of a retired Marine. Daughter wanted a tat for the old man- got my insignia of rank, with a small banner above that says Daddy. Her husband-to-be has one with a Corps of Engineers castle, banner that says Dad. Do not see how a non-drunk person would feel that was an attempt to impersonate a service member.
     
  10. chewchew

    chewchew New Member

    274
    0
    0
    It's possible that I might agree with you....that is when I sober up...that might take a couple of days though ..LOL:D:D
     
  11. SSGSF

    SSGSF New Member

    1,160
    2
    0
    I was in the army man and I have no problem with you getting a tattoo honoring your father as long as it's not the Eagle Globe and Anchor cause I feel that has to be earned. I have a tattoo of my father who was in the Air Force and my Uncle who was a Marine and all it says is there rank and branch . IMOP if you really want to honor your dad join the military.
     
  12. yazul42

    yazul42 Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    1,320
    12
    38
    Kfox,,, chewchew has a good point about an insignia tattoo,, something to consider, it would not bother me, but some folks it would. A good point from a taxi driver for Marines,, heh,heh,heh.

    Good luck,
    Jeff
     
  13. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

    7,315
    272
    83
    Thank you for the input, and you service.

    I talked with dad last year ( don't worry, he was sober), and showed him what I had draw out as of then. He said it was nonoffensive to him, but it may be to others. He is the one who told me to ask other Marines that I know, angd get threir opinion. Believe me, I thank him for his service, as well as for being my father. He always says, "I was just doing my job."

    I wanted to follow in his footsteps, but one week after talking to the recruiter, I found out I had type-1 diabeties. I went from good to go to no go within a matter of davs. Broke my heart, and my old man's. It changed all of my plans for my future to say the least.

    Thank you all for the advice, and for your service to your country. I feel that can never be said often enough. I have some pictures of him from an early hunting trip we both took (the one where he got his first and best buck), I think that may be a better choice. I'll run it by him the next time I see him.
    Thanks again.
     
  14. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    In general, I'd stay away from portrait tatts, they are hard to do and a bad one is stuck with you forever. Not to mention, the bad portrait tatts seem to be really, REALLY, bad. Worse than any other tattoo mistake in the book (other than misspelled names)

    If you decide to do one, research your artist. Ask for references, and ask if they have pictures of previous tatts that are similar in nature.

    You don't want someone's artistic translation to turn into a Quasimodo stuck to your skin do you?
     
  15. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

    7,315
    272
    83
    Good advice Trip. I have used the same artist for the last ten years. She is booked 10 months in advance, and most of the work she does is portrait tats. I am on of the few people who she buys wall flash from, so it works out good for both of us. I've never seen a bad tat come out of her shop, and I have been following her work for 20 years. She did the fox on my right arm in 2004, and the medic alert bracelet on my right wrist in 2006. Yep, I was in my 30s when I got my first. I figure the one I do for dad will go on the left arm for balance, Then I'll be done.

    Most of the effed up work I have seen in my area came out of one shop. I went to check that shop out when I was looking to get my first one, and was treated rudely when I asked to see the work area. I was told I couldn't unless I was getting inked. His shop, his right, but it is my skin. I thanked him for his time and left. This guys older stuf was great, then about 8 or 9 years ago, his work started going down hill. Two years after that, accusations of hep c infections. Kinda makes ya wonder.
     
  16. utf59

    utf59 New Member

    676
    0
    0
    I was in the Army, rather than the Marines, and I know I wouldn't be offended by anyone's tribute to their dad.

    Only thing is, a tattoo is a picture, and that means people see it all at once. If you put something like the globe and anchor in it, people will lock in on that. (What can I say? I've been around the advertising business for 20 years.) If it doesn't communicate clearly, you're just going to be explaining the thing for the rest of your life, or take up wearing long-sleeve shirts all the time.

    As an example, I was in a drinking establishment some years ago and spied a gentleman at the bar wearing an old Army shirt. It was Vietnam-era vintage, with white insignia, including a set of jump wings. He looked barely old enough to have worn it, but having been a paratrooper myself, I wanted to say hello and buy him a beer — if he was the real deal.

    So I sidled up to the bar and commented on his shirt. He said he had picked it up at a surplus store because he thought it looked cool, but that he had never been in the military.

    There are some people who would be offended by that, but I wasn't. He made absolutely no claim to having earned anything on that shirt, so he wasn't misrepresenting himself.

    The point is that he didn't communicate what he meant to. I'm sure I'm not the only veteran who asked him about that shirt.

    As long as your tattoo is immediately perceived the way it's intended, I think you'll be fine and well received. A lot of people are going to think your dad is dead, though, because that's usually when you see a tattoo like that.
     
  17. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

    2,992
    2
    0
    As long as people don't make a claim to something they never did, I have no issues and a lot of the Marines I know don't have any issues with it as well. It is those a$$ clowns that walk around the Wal-Mart parking lot with the Marine Corps Service Alphas blouse, dress blue Cpl chevrons, cammie trousers, and claim they were in. I saw that guy in Charlotte when I was on recruiting duty about 10 years ago. Talk about going high and to the right.