Question for the experts

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by Donnyj, Aug 7, 2009.

  1. Donnyj

    Donnyj New Member

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    In an earlier thread I had described my incident with my GP100 and the bullets that were lodged in the barrel. Remington paid the bill to have the gun fixed. I got the gun back, finally, this week. I sent the gun out in March. According to the paperwork they sent back with the gun, they replaced the barrel, repaired the cylinder, replaced the trigger spring guard spring, and replaced internal components. The paperwork also states the gun was safety function checked, proof tested and range fired tested. I thought there was supposed to be a fired shell casing sent back with the gun, but there was none. My question is the pic that I have attached show some kind of brown, gold color in the barrel all the way down. I cleaned the gun and brushed the barrel and found that some of this substance actually started to disappear. Does this look like a new barrel? Just curious. I don't think when I bought the gun new the barrel looked like this. As always I really appreciate everyone's help, opinions and advice.
     

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  2. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    That is copper fouling from the jacketed bullets that the factory used for test firing. It will come out with normal cleaning. Nothing to worry about, it is normal. Usually, new barrels will foul more and quicker than barrels that have been broke-in or well use due to the slightly rough surface after machining. Glad to hear you got your gun back. Enjoy......................

    Jim......................
     

  3. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    I don't claim to be a expert but I'd say that looks like normal fouling. Very seldom do the factories actually clean the firearms/barrels after test firing/range testing. Since it's a new barrel, it hasn't been broken in yet and may have microscopic burrs in the rifling, causing fouling. Just clean it good and watch to see that bullet holes appear in the target after every shot. After you shoot it a lot, it'll get smoother both in the barrel & action wise as it gets broke in.
     
  4. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    MasterPsmith-we gotta quit doing that-you must type faster than me.
     
  5. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    Sorry bout that, musta beat ya to the punch...

    Jim..................
     
  6. Donnyj

    Donnyj New Member

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    Thanks again for the quick, and valuable info. I used a cleaner that I always use, but it does not seem to clean that fouling out. Is there any brand that you all recommend to get that fouling out?
     
  7. paganwolf

    paganwolf New Member

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    I prefer Birchwood Casey Bore Scrubber. Works Great With both copper and nitro fouling. Just be careful as it will "eat" a copper bore brush.
     
  8. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Find a bore cleaner that specifies copper removal.

    I agree with the others, run some ammo through her and get it broke in! [​IMG]
     
  9. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Shooter's Choice or Sweet's 762 will remove copper fouling. I always use the former. Break in a new hand gun with about 200 rounds of jacketed ammo before going to a lead bullet to reduce the amount of leading you experience. Shooter" Choice also disolves lead and plastic (shotgun wadding) fouling.
     
  10. dukech1

    dukech1 New Member

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    Some guys don't like them, but I use a bore-snake, usually 2 or 3 times through the barrell and once each through the cylinders does it. Then clean the rest of the pistol normally and I use Rem-Oil afterwards, then wipe clean. Some of the other guys like masterPsmith and stalkingbear to name 2 are much more savvy than me, so thier advice should carry more weight.
     
  11. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    The best way I have found to remove the copper fowling is to use a good copper solvent. Using a bore brush, soak the barrel with 3 or 4 strokes and then let it sit and let the solvent do the work. I will usually let it sit for about 10 minutes, then finish cleaning with patches. If you still have copper fowling, repeat the process. It will come clean. New barrels are usually harder to get clean than "seasoned" barrels. Be patient............

    Jim................
     
  12. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    I use Sweets 7.62 to remove copper. Another product that works great to remove carbon and lead fouling in a revolver is Outers Lead Removing cloth. Cut into patch size and use on a cleaning rod to make the bore shine. It is also the best way to remove the tell tale carbon rings that form on the face of your revolvers cylinder and the associated buildup on the forcing cone and crane.
     
  13. Donnyj

    Donnyj New Member

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    Thanks for all the great info. Looks like I need to pick up a good cleaner for the barrel. I'm sure glad I found this forum when I did. The advice and experience on here is great. Thanks again!!
     
  14. WILDCATT

    WILDCATT New Member

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    cleaner

    hoppes #9 I used to use but they have changed owners several times and the formular so I wont use it any more.:rolleyes: