Question for the Enthusiasts

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by Oaktree45, Apr 1, 2020.

  1. Oaktree45

    Oaktree45 Well-Known Member

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    This is a nice looking revolver but in your opinion would it be worth my time to try to sell it or not? It’s a Colt Police Positive .32. It’s marked New Police on one side of the barrel and Police Positive on the other side. Obviously it’s been nickeled or chromed and there is a name etched on the right side just above the grip. The question is, try selling it or just give it to my nephew?

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  2. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Could not totally make it out! What is the Initial of the first name on engraved on the side of the gun?
    Also do you think the Chrome is original or redone?
    I guess you can tell by the Name Etched on it. If the etching is in the Chrome or if the Chrome has covered the Etching.
    Still looks like a nice little Revolver. The New Police was manufactured from around 1928-1947. So as you stated you could sell it but if it is not original and the fact of the name etched on the side it does hurt the collector value. I am not saying someone might not give you some good money for it. And especially if the revolver has been redone, but if the Grips are Original they might want them for a collector's piece they might already have.

    So with that said if your nephew is a gun guy you might think about leaving it to him as a family heirloom. I have several that was left to me and the memories of me and my grandpas in the filed and times shooting and also fishing are priceless!:)
    Example of the Fox Stearlingworth Double Barrel 20 ga., 1890 Winchester 22 Pump and my Pflueger Reels and Steel Fishing Poles with original line!

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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2020
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  3. Oaktree45

    Oaktree45 Well-Known Member

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    It's a "P"
     
  4. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Give it to your nephew.

    The collector value has been compromised, but it should still be a great shooter.
     
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  5. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My advice (worth nothing) is to do a bit of research not only for fun but to determine value. I really like nickel plated Colts. Looks to me that the name is not etched but engraved like used to be done on trophies back in the day. Knowing who the name is interesting to me, as are the grips. St. Louis cops used to customize their S&W model 10's thanks to a jeweler who put a brass cap on the butt with name and badge number engraved on them. History helps with value. Now that everyone is stuck at home, it's kinda fun to do such stuff.

    The original owner might be an interesting person. Then again, might've been a pimp.
    Collector value isn't just "Mint Unfired", it's also about the history of the the piece. Colt used to do factory letters for like $20 to document their pistols. May still do so, don't know. For me, personally, if the owner was documented as a police officer, it's be more interesting. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  6. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Research is fun, you never know what you might find out about it. If it turns out that it’s not worth much go ahead and give it to your nephew
     
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  7. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    It is not 'etched', that is a process carried out using acid. It has been carefully put there by careful and skilful use of multiple lines using an electro-pencil.

    A letter from Colt will establish whether or not it was nickel-plated by the factory, something that just MIGHT have been done for coastguard duty.
     
  8. microadventure

    microadventure Well-Known Member

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    I would take it as a gift and toss it in the back of the safe. I would not buy it, because it's like silk overalls: too pretty for its purpose.
     
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  9. Oaktree45

    Oaktree45 Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps the reason I am so attracted to that revolver is because when I was a kid my toy guns looked like this.

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  10. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    I had the pair of black Cisco Kid cap guns. My late Great Uncle Jack was one of the directors of DCMT - Dicast Metal Toy Company in Coalville. they made the famous UK brand of Lone Star cap guns and being family, he would let my mom buy them at cost price...whoopee.
     
  11. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Sheriffjohn is correct! A whole lot of these revolvers were owned by law enforcement agencies, police officers and military. First Production the Colt Police Positive 1907-1927 then the Second Production = Colt New Police Positive 1928-1947. So it would be great to find some history on it. To and including if it was Blue or Nickel when it left the factory. And the year it was produced. I as many here are always interested in the History behind the older nostalgic weapons. So keep us informed if you find anything. Also if there was any past Police Officers named P. KIEHL. There were several people by that name in the search. Now you have me interested a well so I also will be doing some research. By the way for research what state do you live in and how did you get the revolver? Thanks for the PICS!:)

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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2020
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  12. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    OAKTREE Here is some information:
    Colt Police Positive 32 Cal.
    Year Serial Number Range Year Serial Number Range
    1907 49500-61499 1926 217000-223999
    1908 61500-66999 1927 224000-227999 Pequano
    1909 67000- 1928 | 226000
    1910 74000-84499 1929 | |
    1911 84500-93999 1930 | |
    1912 94000-107999 1931 | |
    1913 108000-111999 1932 | |
    1914 112000-123999 1933 228000-229999 |
    1915 124000-128999 1934 230000-230999 |
    1916 129000-136999 1935 231000-232999 |
    1917 137000-141999 1936 233000-233999 |
    1918 142000-142999 1937 234000-235499 |
    1919 143000-157999 1938 235500- 237000
    1920 158000-168999 1939 238099
    1921 169000-178999 1940 |
    1922 179000-187999 1941 |
    1923 188000-198999 1942 |
    1924 199000-208999 1943 238623
    1925 209000-216999

    You can easily see seemingly production evidently was stopped during WW-2


    Colt Police Positive .38 Special Production Information
    Year Serial Number Range Year Serial Number Range
    1908 1-12999 1941 474000-476999
    1909 13000-22499 1942 477000-478999
    1910 22500-35499 1943 479000-479499
    1911 35500-50999 1944 479500-479999
    1912 51000-64999 1945 480000-480999
    1913 65000-89999 1946 481000-489999
    1914 90000-109999 1947 490000-493999
    1915 110000-124999 1948 494000-501599
    1916 125000-142999 1949 501600-524999
    1917 143000-144999 1950 542400-571499
    1918 145000-161999 1951 571500-607399
    1919 162000-189999 1952 607400-624849
    1920 190000-224999 1953 624850-648899
    1921 225000-241999 1954 648900-662649
    1922 242000-269999 1955 662650-672049
    1923 270000-282999 1956 672050-695399
    1924 283000-308999 1957 695400-710599
    1925 309000-324999 1958 710600-725599
    1926 325000-330999 1959 725600-749999
    1927 331000-332999 1960 750000-776399
    1928 333000-372999 1961 776400-797499
    1929 373000-382999 1962 797500-819499
    1930 383000-399999 1963 819500-839499
    1931 400000-404999 1964 839500-861499
    1932 405000-411999 1965 861500-890799
    1933 412000-422999 1966 890800-D900100
    1934 423000-434999 1967 D900101-D925999
    1935 435000-443999 1968 D926000-D958500
    1936 444000-451999 1969 D994999-A43499
    1937 452000-456999 1970 A43500-B22999
    1938 457000-466999 1971 B23000-B49000
    1939 467000-470999 1972 B49001-C26000
    1940 471000-473999 1973 C26001-F08800


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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2020
  13. Oaktree45

    Oaktree45 Well-Known Member

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    The revolver was part of my brother's collection that I inherited when he passed a number of years ago so I have no idea where he purchased it. I know it was in his possession at least since 1998 and he might have owned it even years before that.
     
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  14. Oaktree45

    Oaktree45 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for that list of serial numbers Sniper03. The serial number on the gun falls in the range of 1908 for the .32's which is surprising considering the condition of the gun. The finish on the gun is almost perfect so I doubt it came from the factory with the nickel finish.

    I have a feeling that the P. Kiehl on the side of the gun is no longer living. I think I will see if cemetery records are available at the two main cemeteries in St. Louis.
     
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  15. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    That is a good place to start. I also have a lot of friends who are in law enforcement in the St. Louis area since I teach law enforcement schools there every year. I will do some research on that end. But I would suppose you are right about him no longer living. It is certainly a possibility a family member sold or traded the weapon in years past.

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  16. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you could find out it was a former policeman's, finding a descendent of the officer that is a gun nut could be quite profitable.
     
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  17. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This was the gun that Theodore Roosevelt issued to officers of the NYPD when he was Police Commissioner.
     
  18. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Give it to your nephew.
     
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  19. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    I would get it appraised first. So you will know the value of your gift to the nephew. This can be done from home using gunbroker. If you want to know how you can pm me.
     
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  20. Oaktree45

    Oaktree45 Well-Known Member

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    I know the value to a collector is compromised because of the nickel plating and the fact that there is a name on the frame. I guess I'll give it to my nephew, he can appreciate such a gun.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2020
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