Question for any gunsmiths here...

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by ICleanBrassWithJager, Jun 16, 2014.

  1. ICleanBrassWithJager

    ICleanBrassWithJager New Member

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    What route did you take to becoming a gunsmith? Did you go to college for it, apprentice, or take online classes?
    Just a general question to start me out. Will think of more to ask about specific questions about methods as I go along.
     
  2. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Mine started as a need to repair a couple of guns and there was not gunsmith willing to take on the repairs.

    I was overseas (I've got 14 years stationed in Germany), shot IPSC at different ranges, and wore out a 1911 in a couple of years. People saw what I was doing with mine and asked me to do the same to theirs.
     

  3. gunny91

    gunny91 New Member

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    I am a gunsmith. I have always been into guns sence I was old enough to hold one up. I recently about four months ago acquired my FFL but I took a online course at Penn foster to learn some basics that I didn't know about certain guns and things .but once I got done I searched for gunsmiths around the house and I had a guy name Bill Van Fossan who had been in the trade for over 30 years and he took me under his wing and taught me alot. He helped me get were I am.
     
  4. Hill_Country_Gunsmith

    Hill_Country_Gunsmith New Member

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    I am mostly self-taught. I was an armorer in the military. After that, I got a part-time job working in the gunsmith shop at a gun shop. My job was cleaning and testing any used guns the shop bought and getting them ready to re-sell. I learned so much about so many different models. It really prepared me to take on repairs of most types of guns. After a year at the shop, I went to a trade school to become a certified machinist. I went that route for two reasons: First, there was no trade school that taught gunsmithing in my area. Second, I figured thorough machining training would allow me a back up or supplemental job if gunsmithing didn't work out. As I was building my business, I was working a job programming CNC machines for a local shop.

    The biggest piece of advice I can give is to learn. Read everything you can get your hands on. There is so much info on the web; use it. To this day, I still go to the internet if I get an odd project or a problem I can't figure out.

    Also, BE HUMBLE! No one can know everything about anything and you never know when someone is going to teach you something.
     
  5. hiwall

    hiwall Active Member

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    I was also self-taught. That was the norm years ago.
     
  6. ICleanBrassWithJager

    ICleanBrassWithJager New Member

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    @Hill_Country_Gunsmith
    @Hiwall
    Would the two of you say being self-taught is a good route, with guidance from online instructions?
     
  7. hiwall

    hiwall Active Member

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    Years ago it was mostly the only route. I guess I would have to say it depends on the individual whether it is best or not.
     
  8. Hill_Country_Gunsmith

    Hill_Country_Gunsmith New Member

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    It all depends on what kind of learner you are. I happen to be able to read and then do. Some people really need demonstration and practical training. The key is to practice on your own guns first.
     
  9. gunny91

    gunny91 New Member

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    And the number one thing you have to do is in order to work on other people's firearms and do it legally is you have to get your FFL and in some places its pretty easy to get but others not so much but definitely check your local zoning laws to see if your able to operate
     
  10. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Back to topic- study firearms, firing mechanisms, barrels,

    and IMHO, three of the finest gunsmiths who ever lived:

    John Browning

    Sam Colt

    Col. Nambu
     
  11. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I get a lot of the same thing. The difference between me and a gunsmith is people expect me to do it for free. I don't mind helping those who help me. But the ones that complain about the professional gunsmith wanting more than a doctor to fix a gun ($60 an hr) I just try to beat them out of their gun as cheaply as possible. They want full wages for their labor. Everyone else is supposed to work for free or minimum wage.
     
  12. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    unless you have an FFL, you can't charge for gun repairs. here is a link to the BATF website which i am citing as the source for my answer.

    http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/gunsmiths.html

    i am a hobbiest gunsmith simply because i enjoy working on guns. i would much rather do my own repairs and modifications myself than being at he mercy of someone else's time. i have no desire to do gunsmithing full time and much prefer doing at my own pace and as my time allows it. more than likely if i were to do it full time, it would leave me very little time to work on my own!
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2014
  13. gunny91

    gunny91 New Member

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    I agree with this they all three were masters in there own way but john browning takes the cake I honestly believe we wouldn't be were we are today in the gun industries if it wasn't for the genius work of john browning. And you can learn so much by just reading his biography
     
  14. gunny91

    gunny91 New Member

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    Nambu was more into the fully auto side.
    Colt was the master of the revolver