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They say that the sharp edges on the rifling are very important and not to wear them down by using grit or fire lapping. So if the sharp edges are so important what about polygonal bores?? they have no sharp edges but can be accurate as hell??
 

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horsecrap. the copper fouling that occurs from shooting is far more detrimental to accuracy than the ridges of the rifling breaking down. Use a solvent that removes (and I mean REMOVES) the fouling and you're in good shape. Savage Inc does not even recommend a break in on their barrels. And they make some pretty accurate rifles.

If you're talking a benchrest barrel here then well, there's all sorts of tips, tricks, and voodoo that surround their break in. Whether or not it really works or is just mumbo jumbo will probably never truly known. If it's gonna shoot, it's gonna shoot and if not, well then there's pretty much nothing you can do.

Polygonal rifling is a whole different animal. I own 4 .40's and one is a glock with the polygonal rifling. It is the LEAST accurate 40 I have. Glock, Springfield xd, browning hi power, and a taurus 24/7. It is accurate, don't get me wrong, just the least accurate out of my group.

I also own an hk p30 in 9mm, also with polygonal rifling. I also own a Beretta 92fs with conventional rifling. They are both EXTREMELY accurate.

So who the hell knows. Personally, I think the polygonal rifling my be slightly easier to clean after shooting but I believe accuracy depends on many other factors of greater importance. Fit to your hand, trigger pull, sights, etc. Basically, it can only shoot as accurately as you can shoot it. And a Ferrari can only go as fast as YOU can pilot it.
 

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if you bought a new rifle or pistol, then my procedure would be to shoot 5-10 rounds and clean, then repeat this several time fo about 20-30 rounds and i consider this the breakin for a new barrel.

if the barrel is an aftermarket one from Shilen, Krieger, Hart or such, they sometimes have specific break in procedures they want taken. as most of these make very accurate barrels, i would personally adhere to their recommendations.

Ryguy, there are many elements that play into accuracy, but the barrel is the most important element. you can take a lesser quality action and put a very high quality barrel on it and out shoot a fancy high dollar action with a lesser quality barrel.
 

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ive never bothered with a break in routine. i just clean the shipping grease/oil out of the barrel and go shooting.

personally i think a barrel is going to lose practical accuracy to erosion of the muzzle and throat before copper buildup ever becomes an issue

maybe someday if i win the lottery ill do a real test of this cuz i find it a very interesting topic. ive some really strange voodoo rituals surrounding barrel breakin. it seems the further you slide down the benchrest hole the wierder it gets. people rub the guns down with mysterious oild and sacrifice small animals and such
 

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ive never bothered with a break in routine. i just clean the shipping grease/oil out of the barrel and go shooting.

personally i think a barrel is going to lose practical accuracy to erosion of the muzzle and throat before copper buildup ever becomes an issue

maybe someday if i win the lottery ill do a real test of this cuz i find it a very interesting topic. ive some really strange voodoo rituals surrounding barrel breakin. it seems the further you slide down the benchrest hole the wierder it gets. people rub the guns down with mysterious oild and sacrifice small animals and such
yeah some of those benchrest guys have some strange methods! i have even read some will clean the bore after every shot. i don't know how true this is. my serious target shooting at home i clean mine after every 10 rounds.
 

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yeah some of those benchrest guys have some strange methods! i have even read some will clean the bore after every shot. i don't know how true this is. my serious target shooting at home i clean mine after every 10 rounds.
oh its true. ive seen it in action. fire a shot scrub for 15 minutes fire another shot and so on. they also tend to have very elaborate rube goldberg like contraptions to hold the guns and only part of their bodies that touch the gun is the tringer finger.

to me that isnt shooting if you dont have the human element behind the gun.
 

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oh its true. ive seen it in action. fire a shot scrub for 15 minutes fire another shot and so on. they also tend to have very elaborate rube goldberg like contraptions to hold the guns and only part of their bodies that touch the gun is the tringer finger.

to me that isnt shooting if you dont have the human element behind the gun.
i agree, as i have seen some of those contraptions! look more like something a barrel or ammo maker would use for testing for accuracy than shooting competition.
 

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horsecrap. the copper fouling that occurs from shooting is far more detrimental to accuracy than the ridges of the rifling breaking down. Use a solvent that removes (and I mean REMOVES) the fouling and you're in good shape. Savage Inc does not even recommend a break in on their barrels. And they make some pretty accurate rifles.

If you're talking a benchrest barrel here then well, there's all sorts of tips, tricks, and voodoo that surround their break in. Whether or not it really works or is just mumbo jumbo will probably never truly known. If it's gonna shoot, it's gonna shoot and if not, well then there's pretty much nothing you can do.

Polygonal rifling is a whole different animal. I own 4 .40's and one is a glock with the polygonal rifling. It is the LEAST accurate 40 I have. Glock, Springfield xd, browning hi power, and a taurus 24/7. It is accurate, don't get me wrong, just the least accurate out of my group.

I also own an hk p30 in 9mm, also with polygonal rifling. I also own a Beretta 92fs with conventional rifling. They are both EXTREMELY accurate.

So who the hell knows. Personally, I think the polygonal rifling my be slightly easier to clean after shooting but I believe accuracy depends on many other factors of greater importance. Fit to your hand, trigger pull, sights, etc. Basically, it can only shoot as accurately as you can shoot it. And a Ferrari can only go as fast as YOU can pilot it.

That sounds about right. Copper fouling is what hurts accuracy. The purpose of breaking in the barrel is to remove rough edges (tool marks and burrs) in the barrel that bullet will drag on and leave fouling. A break-in keeps the barrel free of fouling for the first however many shots so that the bullets are contacting the barrel and not copper fouling already laid down. That direct contact smooths out the rough marks and there is less fouling after the surface are smooth. Proper cleaning and shooting will over time do the same thing. Breaking in the barrel just speeds up the process.

I believe in breaking in the barrel and I have my own little ritual for that. Everyone that does break in a barrel has their own method and it's all a matter of opinion.

Premium barrels are hand lapped and shouldn't need to be broken in. That's why they are hand lapped.

I have no clue about poly. :)
 

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Howa also has a break-in page, and it's pretty good. Remington has a break-in procedure as well for the M24 sniper rifle that is pretty extensive (written for the DOD). I haven't checked any other manufactures. :)
I didn't know Howa had one. I know Winchester has one Krieger and Shilen does. The Shilen site is where I send most people to explain what is happening during the procedure.
All our stainless steel barrels have been hand lapped as part of their production, as well as any chrome moly barrel we install. Hand lapping a barrel polishes the interior of the barrel and eliminates sharp edges or burrs that could cause jacket deformity. This, in fact, is what you are doing when you break-in a new barrel through firing and cleaning.
I'll have to check the Howa and especially the Remington break-in procedures. Thanks for the info!
 
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