Question about 357 Sig

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by DarinCraft, Feb 26, 2010.

  1. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    This is just a question for my own education. I don't have the money or desire to own a 357 sig, but curiosity has gotten the better of me.

    I was told by a gun dealer (i.e. probably knows nothing) that the 357 sig round is a bastard round that is useless. However, I am seeing a lot of people choose it for a defense round. Leads me to believe the gun dealer is wrong and there is something to the round that I would like to know.

    Just so you guys know I am trying to increase my education with ammo so you will probably read more threads by me of this same nature. not trying to irritate anyone, I just want to know the advantages of some of the more popular ammo's out there (i.e. 9, 40, 10, 460R and such)

    Thanks
     
  2. MotorG20

    MotorG20 New Member

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    Hi DC:). The 357 SIG was designed to give 357mag performance from a more compact semi-auto pistol holding a lot more rounds of ammo. It seems that many officers loved the stopping power of the 125gr. 357mag revolver, and wanted to retain that power when they were switched over to semi-auto pisols. There was nothing available at the time, so SIG jumped in. Some people say that the 357SIG wasn't needed, and that a +P or +P+ 9x19 is just as good as the 357SIG, but the SIG is definitley hotter/faster than any 9x19. Even the 147gr. SIG loads are moving pretty fast.
    I don't own a 357SIG, but it's always intrigued me:D.

    MotorG20
     

  3. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Necked cartridges are for rifles!

    The .357 Sig is an answer looking for a question. [​IMG]
     
  4. MotorG20

    MotorG20 New Member

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    Actually, necked semi auto rounds go back a long way, like the 30Luger, 7.62 Tokarev, 7.63 Mauser,etc. But it always had me scratching my head as to why the designers of that time used such small calibers:confused:. The whole idea to necking a handgun cartridge was to fit more powder/give more power, while keeping the length of the cartridge short enough to fit a standard pistol. It seems to me the 357 SIG design, or even larger caliber could have/should have been used by those early designers. It would have been far ahead of the 30cal. rounds in stopping power, especially with a blunt, flat tip. Imagine the 400 Corbon in the 1911at that time. I know, I know, it's blasphemy to speak of another round in the ol' 1911:D.

    MotorG20
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2010
  5. gandog56

    gandog56 New Member

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    Well, I have a SIG P229 that has both the .40 S&W and 357 SIG barrels. A 357 SIG is just a 9mm on steroids, but I kind of like it. Pretty darned accurate round, too.

    It is a pain to reload them as you can't use a no lube carbide type die.
     
  6. MotorG20

    MotorG20 New Member

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    Hi gandog56:). I've heard that if you have carbide 40S&W dies, you can run the 357SIG brass in that first, and then run it in the 357SIG sizer without the need for lube. I've heard the same thing with the 400 Corbon being run up a 45acp carbide die first, then in the 400 Corbon die, without the need of lube.
    Just thought I'd pass that on:D.

    MotorG20
     
  7. crossfire

    crossfire New Member

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    The .357 SIG and 9x23 Winchester are ballistic twins. The 9x23 offers more ammo capacity due to the smaller diameter case. The .38 Casull (.38-45 Clerke or SafeStop) predates both and offers considerably more power.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2010
  8. Shihan

    Shihan Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I know nothing about the round, except I like it and use it as my personal carry choice.
    I am happy with it.
    I guess this will help me learn a bit about it myself.

    Some say it is not a good round for reloading. That's the most negative I have really ever heard about it.
     
  9. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    That is kind of what I wanted to know about it. Is it a round that has: high velocity, high energy, flat trajectory, good penetration? Is it a good compromise between power and speed or is it like the .32 an abortion that should have been discontinued?
     
  10. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    The 357 sig is nothing like a 32. It's a good round, just not a common one. I would feel safe carrying it but I'm going to stick with my 45.
     
  11. Dave_Bone

    Dave_Bone New Member

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    I see the 357 Sig more and more every year in competition. Users claim the cartridge to be more accurate than the 40 S&W.

    The downside of the 357 Sig is more felt recoil.
     
  12. crossfire

    crossfire New Member

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    To quote Accurate Arms:
    "This (the .357 SIG) is without a doubt the most ballistically consistent handgun cartridge we have ever worked with. The standard deviation for every single load developed was less than 10 FPS. The average SD was 5 FPS. This is impressive for any cartridge but especially so for a handgun.The small bottleneck and high working pressure of the round must both contribute to this amazing consistency."

    I wonder if the very similar 9x25 Dillion has the same attributes.
     
  13. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The only problem with this is the flash hole on many Sig cases is much smaller than on the .40. I have experienced decapping pins get stuck in the flash hole several times. I take out the decapping pin and then run the brass through the .40 carbide die. Then I run it through the Sig die w/decapping pin. No lube needed.

    Remember, the Sig round still headspaces on the mouth, not the shoulder. Crimp is still critical.
     
  14. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Apparently it was "designed" to headspace off the case mouth, but yes like any bottleneck case it can headspace off the shoulder also. If there is consistent chamber dimensions that would be even better as you would not have to worry about crimps being too tight. It always seemed silly to headspace off a .355 mouth when a perfectly adequate shoulder is available.
     
  15. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    I am with Robo on this one.
     
  16. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    Robo, since I know nothing about reloading rifle/pistol I am going to assume that your post was essentially stating that Sig round has some advantage with the head spacing, however it needs some modification when reloaded.

    How is the round as far as ballistics are concerned as compared to other similar pistol rounds (i.e. 9 and 40)?
     
  17. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The Sig round is "kind of" a necked down .40 case. I say kind of because you cannot simply neck down .40 brass as it will end up too short. The round is essentially a supercharged 9mm. The bore diameter is .355 rather than the .357 it claims to be.

    It may have some advantages in the feeding department as you are feeding a .356 bullet into a .400 + hole. If you size the brass to headspace off the shoulder crimp can be as tight as you want. If you want it to headspace off the mouth then a medium taper crimp is called for. There is not a lot of neck area to hold the bullet so a light crimp will likely not be enough.

    The flash holes tend to be small so occasionally the de-capping pin will get stuck. I presume the flash holes are small to limit the amount of gas pressure that can bleed back into the primer.

    Round nose bullets in 115 or 124/125 grain cannot be used as the OAL is too long because of where the bearing surface ends and the nose ogive begins. Flat nose or truncated cone bullets work much better.
     
  18. gandog56

    gandog56 New Member

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    Ha ha, learned that trick long ago!;)
     
  19. gandog56

    gandog56 New Member

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    My Lee dies do not exhibit that problem. They work fine.