Question about 12 gauge

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by Maveou, Aug 17, 2009.

  1. Maveou

    Maveou New Member

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    Hi guys. First post here, I'll try to give as much information as possible. I inherited a 12 gauge shotgun from my father after he passed, and took it to a local gun shop to have the guy tell me if it was safe to shoot. He said it was, I believe, a full choke, and I shouldn't shoot 00 buck out of it, because it could blow the barrel. He said I could have it modified, but I don't recall much about that. My now ex-boyfriend then took it, disregarding the advice given at the gun shop and fired it a few times with 00 buck and bird shot. It did fine, and it kicked hard. It is a Savage Automatic (We thought it was a Browning) On the rubber edged butt of the gun it says "White Line Pachmaur Gun Works" .. I have no idea guys. Young lady (27) here, just trying to make sure that I don't go getting myself if I was forced to use it. I have a Davis p-380 but have recently learned the firing pins can go bad, break and cause critical injury or death if fired, so I am wanting to depend on this shotgun. Maybe buy a new one? :) Thank you for any help, and sorry to take your time.
     
  2. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    Welcome to the community. I'm sorry I can't be of much help with the shotgun although, I'm not aware that shooting buckshot thru a full choke is harmful in anyway. That's lead shot though, steel is a different animal and I have very little knowledge of it. Someone here will be able to help you more with your questions.
    Stop in the introduction area and let everyone know you're here.
     

  3. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    First Off, welcome to the forum. Glad to have you here.

    From your description, some pictures would help, it sounds like you have something similiar to a Savage 720.

    The "White Lines" Pachmyer Gun Works" is the brand of aftermarket, recoil reducing butt pad to make the weapon easier to shoot and not as punishing. I believe a lot of the early Savage shotguns came with a steel buttpad, which offered no recoil dampening effects.

    As to whether the weapon is safe to use, that would depend on you. Are you comfortable with the weapon? Can you shoot it safely and do you feel that you are in control of the weapon?

    As for the choke situation, and what rounds to use, I am going to defer to some of the regular shotgun shooters around here, as that is not really my area of expertise and I would hate to steer you wrong.

    Welcome to the Forum - Stop by the Introduction Threads and announce yourself. We have a great community here and everyone will be happy to have a new member.

    JD
     
  4. Maveou

    Maveou New Member

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    Thank you for your help! Yes, I am comfortable firing this shotgun, as long as I can get a definitive answer on the buckshot/choke question. A year or so ago I had high tensions of goings-on in the surrounding area, and figured, if it came down do it I'd guess I'd have to find out the hard way. The guy at the shop kind of scared me when he told me the barrel would explode and kill me. As for the picture, yes, that is my shotgun. I didn't want to modify the barrel because I wanted to keep it as my Daddy had it. (If I'm not mistaken in what I think I heard from the gun shop guy)
     
  5. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Okay, so we got a kind of old Savage 720, or there abouts, and it has a full choke on it.

    Shotgun Guys, get in here and impart some wisdom please. I don't want to speak out of turn.

    I would assume the choke can be removed, perhaps with a key or a choke tube wrench, and that would allow you to shoot just about anything, but I am not familiar with the model at all.

    Let's give the guys the next 8 or so hours and the knowledge should come pouring in....

    JD
     
  6. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I'm not sure the 720 has removable chokes. Look at the end of the barrel, please make sure the weapon is empty first. If it has a removable choke there should be two small notches, possibly 4 on the end, that is your choke. As JD mentioned, there is a choke tool but I'm sure you have a quarter laying around somewhere and it will do nicely. Simply put the quarter in the slots, turn counter clockwise and the choke should come out.
    If there is not a notch of some sort there you cannot change chokes without taking the barrel to a gunsmith.
     
  7. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    You could compromise & just use some #4 or #6 shot rather than the buckshot. I'd bet my life on either (#4 or #6) stopping an intruder at inside-the-house ranges. They have more & smaller bb's than buckshot does. The first shot in my shotgun is a target load that would be about like a #7.5 shot.

    Alternatively, you might be able to find a shorter, less choked barrel, but i'm not familiar with that model myself. I also am not into autoloading shotguns, just pumps.
     
  8. divinginn

    divinginn Member

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    I used buckshot for years in a full choke gun,it is what you want when deer hunting to keep a tight pattern. I am sure a gun that old has a fixed choke without the removable ones. Shoot it and enjoy,they make reduced recoil shells in buckshot which would be easier on the shoulder,2 3/4 inch shells will kick less than 3 inch shells,not sure which size you were using but your gun may shoot both sizes,some do some do not. Any questions just ask.
     
  9. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    You can use 00Buck in a full choke. You cannot use slugs though. For a defense load, I would use #4 Buckshot. Less worry about interior and exterior walls and is devastating on tissue. Makes for a good stopper.........

    Jim.....................
     
  10. Maveou

    Maveou New Member

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    Thank you for your replies and time. No, this does not have a removable choke. I have an artillery can full of old unshot shells, are they still usable? I do have 1 box, Winchester 2 3/4 shells (7 1/2 shot) Light Target Load shells.. and the others inside are unboxed.. they say 6 (Winchester Super-x? Lettering is faded). I only have a couple of 00 shells, which I've fired some of previously, and -wow- .. The recoil does not bother me, I actually prefer it. Also, for safety's sake, would the loose shells in the artillery box would have to be bashed around before they'd go off, or is it rather dangerous to have them loose? They are not regularly moved.
    Thank you again for your help guys, it is most appreciated.
     
  11. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    The shells in the ammo can should be fine. The biggest thing to watch with ammo is moisture and severe temp changes. If they have been dry, stored in a relatively level temp, they will last longer then you. If they show no corrosion around the brass or primer I would say they're OK to shoot. That is assuming they are all plastic and not paper hulls. The old paper hulls can be fired but don't usually hold up like the plastic and should be looked at a little more closely prior to firing.
    Not trying to insult you.....The 6 is the size of the shot and if they are the same length as the 2 3/4 shells you have the box for you'll be fine.

    Here is a chart on shot size.
    Shotgun Ammo and more Shotgun Ammo! ShotgunWorld.com is Your Best Source for Shotgun Info on shotgun ammo.
     
  12. Maveou

    Maveou New Member

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    No insult taken, I am here to learn. I know safety, and how to shoot, but the technical aspects of ammo, chokes, etc, I am not clear on :) Thank you for your help!
     
  13. Maveou

    Maveou New Member

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    I went and had some pictures developed today of my guns. This is a picture of the shotgun, just for added clarity (thanks again for your help guys!)[​IMG]
     
  14. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The Savage 720 is essentially a copy of the Browning A-5. Most literature explaining the A-5 will apply to the 720. Full choke was very common in this era (40's - 50's). These are quality firearms rated for modern ammo. Patterns will be tight. For home defense uses it really does not matter much what size shot you use. At ranges of 15-20 feet any 12 ga round will make a hole in the target fist size or smaller. Because of the tight choke, you will have to aim like a rifle. Buck shot will not hurt it. Slugs are not a very good idea as they must be swaged down in the choke and pressures can spike.

    It does not appear to be in the kind of condition a serious collector would be interested in so it is not particularly valuable. The barrel can be cut down to 18 or 20" and this will eliminate the choke. You will have a barrel that is essentially "cylinder bore" or non choked. This set up is more desireable for home defense. The only real issue is the front sight bead base would hve to be removed and silver soldered on the barrel after cutting. The high receiver neccesitated the use of the raised bead common on these shotguns.
     
  15. Shotgun Shooter

    Shotgun Shooter New Member

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    Anything except slugs are safe to shoot through it. If you cut the barrel as Robo mentioned, then slugs would be fine to shoot through it. Depends on what your main purpose you'll use this shotgun for, take your pick. Nice gun!

    S.S.
     
  16. YJGUY

    YJGUY New Member

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    Your 720 and Remington model 11 (among others)are a Browning patent copy of the famous A5 . Most parts are not interchangable though. The operation is the same however.

    00 buck is ok to shoot, but never shoot steel shot or you with ruin the barrel.

    You need to check the friction ring setup on the gun since it is a recoil (not gas) operated design. If it kicks hard it may be due to improper settings of these rings. The excessive recoil may also damage the gun and break the forend which is very thin at the bottom edge.

    Here is a link to properly set the rings. Do this and you should be fine. Set your rings to the "heavy loads" setting when shooting 00 buck or any "high brass" shell. Go to the "light loads" setting when shooting light game (low brass) or trap type loads. Use very little to no oil on the magazine tube since excess oil will defeat the purpose of the friction rings too causing excess recoil and battering of the internals of the gun.

    If you a betting your life on this gun get the proper ammo and ring settings. Also, since it is a recoil operated weapon you need to have it firmly against yor shoulder in order for it to cycle properly. I you "John Wayne", or shoot from the hip it may not properly eject the empty hull causing a jam. Not the ideal situation when your life is on the line.

    I would suggest getting "Daddy's Gun" working properly for recreational use ,but for HD (home defense) buy a cheap pump (Remngton 870, Mossberg 590).

    I hope this helps.

    Remington Model 11
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2009