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Hello folks, newb here. My wife and I are getting our Ohio CCW soon. We are not exactly sportsmen or firearm enthusiasts, but want to make educated pistol purchases after receiving our permit. I've done a little shooting as a Boy Scout and some hunting trips as a youngster, but that's about it. We don't really know much about firearms, but would like to figure out what pistols might work best for us. We'd also like to shop a deal. Are there good deals at online retailers? I know that a person has some "red tape" to work through before purchasing a firearm, so I'm not even sure if "online" is an option.

I'd like to ask for any and all feedback folks can offer for newbs looking to buy their first pistols. What pistols are worth considering? What retailers are worth considering? What are some pitfalls we should know about?

I realize this question is kind of open-ended and broad, similar to joining a car forum to ask who makes the best car. But I hope I can start to glean some information to help guide our decision.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Welcome to the FTF covey.

Search the internet for Gun Rental Ranges near your zip code.

A range that rents guns let's you shoot multiple brands, models, calibers, etc. The range likely will have training available.

Do you have neighbors or friends that shoot? Ask them if you can tag along, offer to pay for the ammo. Most shooters love to help newbies learn to shoot.

Right now guns can be bought, finding ammo is tough and expensive.

We are here to facilitate your journey into the shooting sports realm.
 

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Find a good LGS and get some live advice from people you can read and decide if they know what they're talking about or not. Going to a gun forum at your level of knowledge is not the best place to start out IMO. Rent some guns at ranges and learn first hand.
 

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Find what fits your hand comfortably and what seems to point on target naturally. Pick out a few, from there, rent a few to see what actually shoots good. You and your wife likely have different hand sizes, so if you aren't considering a gun for each of you, reconsider.

Imo, go to a big box chain store with a big selection and handle as many as you can. When you are ready to buy, support a privately owned shop. Many times you will get better service and knowledge.

Keep in mind the U.S. is in an ammo shortage right now, so what you find, if any, could be expensive.

Welcome to the forum from the Lima area. When you get a chance find the introductions threads and introduce yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Welcome to the FTF covey.

Search the internet for Gun Rental Ranges near your zip code.

A range that rents guns let's you shoot multiple brands, models, calibers, etc. The range likely will have training available.

Do you have neighbors or friends that shoot? Ask them if you can tag along, offer to pay for the ammo. Most shooters love to help newbies learn to shoot.

Right now guns can be bought, finding ammo is tough and expensive.

We are here to facilitate your journey into the shooting sports realm.
Thank you for the feedback. Yes, I have a few family members that have firearms, so I'll reach out to them. I'll also look for some rental ranges near me.

Find a good LGS and get some live advice from people you can read and decide if they know what they're talking about or not. Going to a gun forum at your level of knowledge is not the best place to start out IMO. Rent some guns at ranges and learn first hand.
Yah, I figured part of the process would have to include me trying out a few firearms at a range somewhere. I agree that blindly going on feedback from a forum, and nothing else, can be misleading.

Find what fits your hand comfortably and what seems to point on target naturally. Pick out a few, from there, rent a few to see what actually shoots good. You and your wife likely have different hand sizes, so if you aren't considering a gun for each of you, reconsider.

Imo, go to a big box chain store with a big selection and handle as many as you can. When you are ready to buy, support a privately owned shop. Many times you will get better service and knowledge.

Keep in mind the U.S. is in an ammo shortage right now, so what you find, if any, could be expensive.

Welcome to the forum from the Lima area. When you get a chance find the introductions threads and introduce yourself.
My dad also mentioned the ammo shortage. I'm curious why. Is it because of the administration change in DC? The wife and I are definitely getting separate firearms. In fact, she has already mandated that hers is a pink color.:ROFLMAO:
 

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Do you guys plan to shoot/train often..? Or will these be in the nightstand "just in case" guns.. As others have said.. most gun shops with a range will let you try out different guns, then waive you rental fees if you purchase a gun. If your not going to train often, and stay really up on the function of the gun becoming second nature, you might want to consider revolvers. They are always ready to go...just pick it up and start squeezin... With the sem-auto.. Is their a safety..on, or off.. Is it cocked..is there one in the pipe..etc. Thats alot to think about in a fast moving..high stress situation, if you dont stay familiar with the operation of that gun..and have it all pre programmed in your brain . Then there is reliability.. I dont consider a semi-auto to be reliable until i have 300 rounds thru it with no malfunctions. You will want a good hollow point round..some semi's can be finiky when it comes to that. A revolver eats anything..every time. And..if you leave a semi sitting in a drawer loaded for a long time the mag springs can become weak..(i have had this happen with my 92FS).. Not an issue with a revolver..you could leave it sit loaded somewhere for years.. pick it up..squeeze the trigger..and it will go BANG... As far as pink goes..S&W used to sell a hammerless lady smith with a pink grip..She might like that..?
 

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The ammo shortage is due to a myriad of reasons. COVID caused a run, the election caused a run, then there is ammo hoarding still going on. What it amounts to is lack of confidence in our govt. representatives supporting the second amendment as they should and a general lack of confidence in government at both federal and state levels. Ammo went from a 12 year low in pricing that lasted 3-4 years to "can't get it and expensive" in one month.

If you want ammo, you're going to have to pay a lot for it. From your postings, it sounds like you will need a lot in order to get familiar with guns and your guns in particular. There couldn't be a worse (or better) time to buy guns and ammo depending on how you look at it. Most people here don't believe in depending on the police to protect them as they expect it. Never in history have people bought guns and ammo as they are today. Join the crowd and think about why this is going on. Don't depend on other people to protect your lives. Do be prepared to protect yourselves and other innocent people. The best defense of a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Do you guys plan to shoot/train often..? Or will these be in the nightstand "just in case" guns..
To be honest, probably the latter. But I realize the need to program the brain to handle the firearm. So we may need to head out back (we live in the country) or to a local range to keep ourselves fresh.

As others have said.. most gun shops with a range will let you try out different guns, then waive you rental fees if you purchase a gun. If your not going to train often, and stay really up on the function of the gun becoming second nature, you might want to consider revolvers. They are always ready to go...just pick it up and start squeezin... With the sem-auto.. Is their a safety..on, or off.. Is it cocked..is there one in the pipe..etc. Thats alot to think about in a fast moving..high stress situation, if you dont stay familiar with the operation of that gun..and have it all pre programmed in your brain . Then there is reliability.. I dont consider a semi-auto to be reliable until i have 300 rounds thru it with no malfunctions. You will want a good hollow point round..some semi's can be finiky when it comes to that. A revolver eats anything..every time. And..if you leave a semi sitting in a drawer loaded for a long time the mag springs can become weak..(i have had this happen with my 92FS).. Not an issue with a revolver..you could leave it sit loaded somewhere for years.. pick it up..squeeze the trigger..and it will go BANG...
This is great feedback! Thank you!

As far as pink goes..S&W used to sell a hammerless lady smith with a pink grip..She might like that..?
Yup, she might like that.:)If you have any information or web link for something like that, feel free to share.

The ammo shortage is due to a myriad of reasons. COVID caused a run, the election caused a run, then there is ammo hoarding still going on. What it amounts to is lack of confidence in our govt. representatives supporting the second amendment as they should and a general lack of confidence in government at both federal and state levels. Ammo went from a 12 year low in pricing that lasted 3-4 years to "can't get it and expensive" in one month.

If you want ammo, you're going to have to pay a lot for it. From your postings, it sounds like you will need a lot in order to get familiar with guns and your guns in particular. There couldn't be a worse (or better) time to buy guns and ammo depending on how you look at it. Most people here don't believe in depending on the police to protect them as they expect it. Never in history have people bought guns and ammo as they are today. Join the crowd and think about why this is going on. Don't depend on other people to protect your lives. Do be prepared to protect yourselves and other innocent people. The best defense of a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.
This all makes perfect sense. Thanks for sharing. Yah, we are doing all of this to protect ourselves against the bad guy and have less reliance on other people. My wife has nearly become a victim a couple times in our marriage. It's made her quite uneasy.
 

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BTW, m_ridzon, welcome here. I do think you are rationalizing a huge decision well. Carrying a gun is one of the highest responsibilities there is. Getting the right training, practice, and familiarity with whatever you buy is critical. Nobody in their right mind wants to take another life but life brings to us what it brings. Times are unprecedented right now and you're doing a wise thing. Keep asking questions. Questions are free to ask. Learning and familiarity is crucial. And.....VOTE! (y)
 

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To be honest, probably the latter. But I realize the need to program the brain to handle the firearm. So we may need to head out back (we live in the country) or to a local range to keep ourselves fresh.
Even if you don't want to burn the ammo weekly, or even monthly, consider developing a "dry fire" routine where you also focus on drawing, aiming, firing upon your imaginary target. Helps you get handling time, helps you try out your clothing/holster choices and your draw/holstering techniques, and at least keeps your mind in it.

Though, as pointed out, nothing replaces range time. And, the more varied and "realistic" you can make things, such as with targets at variable distances, time pressures, moving targets, the need to employ cover, etc, the better.

If new to shooting, I'd also strongly recommend finding at least a couple of exceptional trainers and then taking at least a couple of good courses on basic defensive handgun use. Good classes can be invaluable to opening one's eyes to issues that can be hard to imagine for a first-timer.

Good luck with everything.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
BTW, m_ridzon, welcome here. I do think you are rationalizing a huge decision well. Carrying a gun is one of the highest responsibilities there is. Getting the right training, practice, and familiarity with whatever you buy is critical. Nobody in their right mind wants to take another life but life brings to us what it brings. Times are unprecedented right now and you're doing a wise thing. Keep asking questions. Questions are free to ask. Learning and familiarity is crucial. And.....VOTE! (y)
You are correct, as we are taking this very seriously. We want to apply due diligence so we act responsibly.

Even if you don't want to burn the ammo weekly, or even monthly, consider developing a "dry fire" routine where you also focus on drawing, aiming, firing upon your imaginary target. Helps you get handling time, helps you try out your clothing/holster choices and your draw/holstering techniques, and at least keeps your mind in it.

Though, as pointed out, nothing replaces range time. And, the more varied and "realistic" you can make things, such as with targets at variable distances, time pressures, moving targets, the need to employ cover, etc, the better.

If new to shooting, I'd also strongly recommend finding at least a couple of exceptional trainers and then taking at least a couple of good courses on basic defensive handgun use. Good classes can be invaluable to opening one's eyes to issues that can be hard to imagine for a first-timer.

Good luck with everything.
I didn't think of dry firing. Good idea! Classes too with trainers!(y)
 

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I didn't think of dry firing. Good idea! Classes too with trainers!(y)
First and foremost, welcome to the forum. When you have a minute, swing by the introductions sub forum, and tell us about yourself.

With dry fire, always check the manual before dry firing any firearm. On rimfires, if can gouge the edge of the chamber(s), and on some certain venterfire ones, it can damage the firing pin, potentially breaking it.

If you go for a revolver, generally speaking, if it uses a transfer bar to contact the firing pin with the hammer, you are good. However, having had a firing pin break (At a range, during a match, thankfully.), it's not something you want happening, in a critical moment.

Also, the time to ask about a certain make or model is BEFORE you buy it, not after. That way you are well informed, while making the choice, and not stuck with a model that cost less, but has several reported issues.

And take everything you read on the web, even here, with a grain of salt, sometimes a whole shaker of it.

And the only dumb question is still, the one you don't ask. Got some members on here that have a lot of good knowledge, that can help you with any issues, and to make an informed decision.
 

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Even if you don't want to burn the ammo weekly, or even monthly, consider developing a "dry fire" routine where you also focus on drawing, aiming, firing upon your imaginary target. Helps you get handling time, helps you try out your clothing/holster choices and your draw/holstering techniques, and at least keeps your mind in it.

Though, as pointed out, nothing replaces range time. And, the more varied and "realistic" you can make things, such as with targets at variable distances, time pressures, moving targets, the need to employ cover, etc, the better.

If new to shooting, I'd also strongly recommend finding at least a couple of exceptional trainers and then taking at least a couple of good courses on basic defensive handgun use. Good classes can be invaluable to opening one's eyes to issues that can be hard to imagine for a first-timer.

Good luck with everything.
The jug shoots are good because you have to hit a moving target.. and tons of fun..
 

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You chose a bad time to pick up on this sport/hobby, but I imagine you already guessed that. Back on task, if you can only have one, the quick answer, when/if the current shortage abates, would be a Glock 19 or Smith & Wesson M&P 2.0 Compact with as many, (factory), magazines as you can afford. Either/or have a proven track record, are user friendly, and are dependable as the sun rising in the East.
 
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I would suggest that you sign up for the NRA First Step training program. It is a course that will teach you the basics. It is better than learning bad habits from folks who think that they are experts, but really are not...... And, by the way, nearly everyone who has owned a firearm for two weeks or more think that they are experts. First Steps is exactly that, they will teach you the proper knowledge, skills and attitude for safe firearm shooting.

Go to the NRA site, and check for training programs near you. It will be a day well spent.
 
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Training is really important and as mentioned you really need someone that is certified. You need to let your wife choose her own handgun based on fit and ability to operate it safely and effectively. If it works for you that will be a plus as you can share mags and ammo but let her choose first. I did not mean to negate revolvers when I mentioned mags. Substitute speed loaders.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
First and foremost, welcome to the forum. When you have a minute, swing by the introductions sub forum, and tell us about yourself.
Thank you! I already posted in the Intro forum!:)

With dry fire, always check the manual before dry firing any firearm. On rimfires, if can gouge the edge of the chamber(s), and on some certain venterfire ones, it can damage the firing pin, potentially breaking it.

If you go for a revolver, generally speaking, if it uses a transfer bar to contact the firing pin with the hammer, you are good. However, having had a firing pin break (At a range, during a match, thankfully.), it's not something you want happening, in a critical moment.
Great tips! Thank you!

Also, the time to ask about a certain make or model is BEFORE you buy it, not after. That way you are well informed, while making the choice, and not stuck with a model that cost less, but has several reported issues.
I agree 110%! That's why I'm here, gathering information.:)

You chose a bad time to pick up on this sport/hobby, but I imagine you already guessed that.
I know. Yes, the timing wasn't great. As mentioned above, this isn't exactly a newfound passion or hobby, rather it's for family protection. We have had it on our "to-do" list for several years, but life kept getting in the way. Oh well!馃し鈥嶁檪锔

Back on task, if you can only have one, the quick answer, when/if the current shortage abates, would be a Glock 19 or Smith & Wesson M&P 2.0 Compact with as many, (factory), magazines as you can afford. Either/or have a proven track record, are user friendly, and are dependable as the sun rising in the East.
Thank you for this feedback! Most likely, we will both purchase our individual firearms, rather than a single pistol to be used by both of us.

I would suggest that you sign up for the NRA First Step training program. It is a course that will teach you the basics. It is better than learning bad habits from folks who think that they are experts, but really are not...... And, by the way, nearly everyone who has owned a firearm for two weeks or more think that they are experts. First Steps is exactly that, they will teach you the proper knowledge, skills and attitude for safe firearm shooting.

Go to the NRA site, and check for training programs near you. It will be a day well spent.
Yes, this is a great idea. We'll check into some training.

You need to let your wife choose her own handgun based on fit and ability to operate it safely and effectively. If it works for you that will be a plus as you can share mags and ammo but let her choose first. I did not mean to negate revolvers when I mentioned mags. Substitute speed loaders.
Yes, that's a great idea. Her fitment is important. We'll definitely be aware of that when making a purchase.
 

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Gotta get what feels right for you.

Mine:

239284


M&P M2.0 | Smith & Wesson

This gun fits me perfectly. Everything about it is smooooooth.

Hers:

239285


M&P Shield EZ | Smith & Wesson

9mm might be a better choice with the ammo shortage, but she got the .380 before the 9mm came out. She really likes it. She has very small hands and this gun is very easy for her to use.

Yes I'm partial, and I own 300 shares of Smith & Wesson stock. But I bought the stock after buying these really sweet guns. Guess why.....
 
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