Pros & Cons of press checks

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by PANDEMIC, May 22, 2019.

  1. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

    796
    709
    93
    A loaded chamber indicator can break and indicate an empty chamber when the chamber actually still has a round in it. As far as I know it can't break and show the chamber full when it is actually empty. And therein lies the difference. Correct me if I'm wrong.

    EDIT: Also, never said I wasn't positively aware of the loaded state of my gun at time of loading. Said I didn't feel the need to do press checks to verify after the fact.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2019
  2. Greg_r

    Greg_r Well-Known Member

    978
    1,296
    93
    I I dont generally do press checks, The pistols I normally carry do not have a LCI or a chamber view port either. Mine are loaded when I put them on and unloaded when I put them away.

    that said, I see no harm in doing press checks.
     
    oO_Rogue_Oo and Rifling82 like this.

  3. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

    4,434
    7,816
    113
    I guess I've never thought about it... I have done press checks, but I really don't know why you would have to practice them, they're pretty easy to do. Sounds like you have a new gun Pandemic and you're enjoying tinkering with it, we've all been there
     
    PANDEMIC and Caveman Jim like this.
  4. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

    7,076
    3,093
    113
    DITTO!:D I don't have 'unloaded' guns around.:) And there may be some here who use AR's and are not familiar with the 'right/left load' when loading, which will negate the need for a press check on the rifle.;)
     
  5. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

    885
    1,259
    93
    Sounds about right.

    I have been doing a ton of dry fire practice lately with my snap caps. Some holstering and unholstering to get quicker at doing it. But most of it is doing the coin drill and dry firing to master my grip, trigger control and reduce flinching as much as possible.


    I've already submitted all the documents for my CHL and now just playing the waiting game. I'm also practicing keeping a snap cap in the chamber while I have the firearm on me as I go out and about my daily routines at home that way I can overcome my fear of carrying with a live round in the chamber.

    The thing I learned about doing the press check is if doing it one handed, you pull back the slide just enough to reset the trigger and continue to reuse that same snap cap vs taking out the mag, ejecting the snap cap. Put the mag back in and chamber another snap cap which is what I've been doing until I found out about the pulling the slide back just enough to reset the trigger and just reusing that same snap cap. After a while I'll swap out the snap caps when dry firing so that way I'm not putting all that wear on just one snap cap.
     
    Caveman Jim likes this.
  6. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim Well-Known Member Supporter

    1,306
    2,382
    113
    I grew up traveling with a military family but dad would find housing in the country most times so I was always out of doors hunting, fishing and building forts.
    Out of three boys I was the only one that really like to shoot, I was taught gun safety and common sense when I was a kid and I had the sense beat out of me if I didn’t use it.
    After I got out of the military I used to take my dad and brothers out to shoot but never really got into buying a bunch of guns because I was working on the road and had no real homebase to store them.
    After I settled down and bought a house that’s when the bug hit me and I took off running like a scalded cat.
    I too was a little reprehensible about concealed carrying a round in the chamber with two small kids in the house but I got over it, taught them at an early age not to ever touch my guns unless I was present & gave permission.

    Given time you’ll feel very comfortable carrying condition one. Just remember to keep your head on a swivel and be aware of your surroundings at all times. I’m not saying that you have to be a tactical Tommy, I’m just saying use commonsense because evil lurks everywhere.

    Good luck
     
    PANDEMIC and Rifling82 like this.
  7. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

    885
    1,259
    93
    I agree with you in all aspects of that. I've been doing research on conceal carry. Empty Chamber vs One in the chamber. And everyone says to do it with in one the chamber because theirs so many things that can go on where you just may not have the time to rack it. And I'll keep practicng some more where I'll have it chambered, unholster it, shoot my target and then reholster kind of thing but I take my time and do it slow. I have seen youtube vids of people accidently shooting themselves in the leg or foot because they have their finger on the trigger as their pulling it out from the holster. I got into the habit of resting my finger along the side like you should be doing of the frame as I'm drawing and THEN once I have my weapon on the target then you can put your finger on the trigger and fire. And I trained with my snap caps doing it this way and treating as if it were the real deal.

    I just start slow and pick up the pace as I get better at it and feel confortable and train with my snap caps as much as possible so that it becomes second nature.

    But honestly I rather take all the time I need in the world and still be slow at it, then being trigger happy and having my finger on the trigger as I'm drawing from the holster which is the habit I kinda of had when I first got into the whole holster and reholster thing and doing this with dummy rounds.






    Watch the slow motion part as the guy puts his finger on the trigger as soon as he reaches for his gun and then pulls the trigger way too early as he draws it from his holster. This is why I'll practice with dummy rounds as much as I need to and then take it real slow with live rounds. And then as I feel confortable I can then pick up the pace.
     
    Caveman Jim likes this.
  8. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    7,526
    1,165
    113
    The video you show also holds some lessons about holster design. The holster “Ol’ Tex” is using in that video is a Blackhawk Serpa. It has a finger latch to retain the pistol. The bad part of the design is the release is right above the trigger. So, when you press in on it and draw, it is almost a natural follow through for your index finger to drop right onto the trigger. He was using a 1911. His hand already deactivated the grip safety when he gripped the pistol. His finger presses the release on the holster as he draws, and his hand grip position is one that sweeps the manual safety off as he clears the holster. So, as his trigger finger follows through, he slaps that wonderfully light, short stroke trigger that is part of the appeal of the 1911 to those of us who love it.

    So, combination of poor habits, poor practice repeated over and over again, combined with certain gear, can add up to a really bad day.

    I have some Serpa holsters, but not for Glocks or single action triggered pistols. On a double action, I’ve had no trouble with them.
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2019
    PANDEMIC and Caveman Jim like this.
  9. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

    10,341
    6,913
    113
    I never do press checks! The weapons I use and depend upon are always loaded with a round in the chamber. But if one feels good press checking I guess so be it!
    But the only danger with press checking is not getting the slide or the bolt completely into battery after the press check. We certainly do not recommend it with the AR-15 Rifle. All one needs to do to assure the round has been chambered is check the ammunition in the Magazine. Even rounds load from the Right side of the Mag and Odd Rounds load from the Left side of the Magazine. After dropping the Bolt just check the ammunition in the Magazine. After the initial load the round should be on the Left Side of the Magazine when loading even numbered rounds. There has been several occasions where press checking the AR Rifle has been a serious problem. On two occasions, one where a dog was viciously attacking a child. The officer had press checked his AR and it was not totally in Battery. So when he attempted to shoot the dog the gun went click and did not fire the round. And another example was in a shooting where the AR had been press checked and did not fire. Bottom line the AR Bolt should be dropped with force and one needs to check the Top Round in the Magazine. If the odd round in on the top of the Mag the top loaded right side round either fell on the ground or evaporated in mid air!;)
    As stated I carry all my weapons ready to go! And IMO no need to do a press check!
    They did not extract a round from the Chamber on their own!;)
    03
     
    oO_Rogue_Oo, JimRau, Fred_G and 2 others like this.
  10. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim Well-Known Member Supporter

    1,306
    2,382
    113
    I have the exact same holster for my XDM40 and have never had a problem with it.
    It seems that the problem was that military and police officers pull the gun out and immediately crook their finger into the trigger before they have the gun leveled. I can see this happening but to be honest, finger discipline is the culprit and not design. IMHO, mind you, I am not a Pro.
     
    PANDEMIC likes this.
  11. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim Well-Known Member Supporter

    1,306
    2,382
    113
    Good to know about the position of the rounds on the magazine, I learned something today. Thanks Sniper03;)

    It has been mentioned that if doing tactical reload’s that one should not load more than 25 rounds into the magazine. I have never had a problem with my 30 round magazine‘s being full but I can see it might not seat with a closed bolt unless sufficient force is used.
     
    PANDEMIC likes this.
  12. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

    885
    1,259
    93
    I made it a habit to load all my AR mags to 28 rnds. This way they go in and out real smooth. Brand new mags that I buy, I'll load them to 30. I've got 1 pmag where if you load it to 30, no matter how many times you give it a light smack at the bottom of the mag, it still wont go in. So from that point forward, I fill all my mags to 2 rnds less than what it actually can hold, even extended mags.
     
    JimRau, Sniper03 and Caveman Jim like this.
  13. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

    885
    1,259
    93
    I have never done a press check on my AR. Mainly because I have a habit of watching my chamber as I'm pulling the CH to the rear and letting it go and seeing it chamber a live round and the fact that I have lots of experience with it as well, I can distingiush the sound and weight of one thats loaded/chambered and one thats not.
     
    Caveman Jim likes this.
  14. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    7,526
    1,165
    113
    The other factors that I mentioned contributed to the negligent/accidental discharge in the video. I don’t lay the blame solely on the holster design.

    Sweeping the safety off before having the pistol clear of the holster and heading in the direction of the target, is bad form which, it seems became practice for the individual in the video.

    Folks who train deliberately on keeping their finger clear of the trigger guard usually don’t have a problem with Serpa holsters. Many of the knock offs have moved the pressure point to place the finger above the trigger guard, however. This would not be a bad idea for a update to the Blackhawk design, just from a liability standpoint.

    The weight and travel on a 1911 is a bit less than that required on a Glock or an XD. Especially for high speed, low drag YouTube operators who get their triggers taken down to 1 lb with no pretravel or overtravel, “Kause it’s what the SEAL Beret Delta Ops guys do, ya know”.
     
    PANDEMIC and Caveman Jim like this.
  15. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim Well-Known Member Supporter

    1,306
    2,382
    113
    Agreed on all accounts.
    I wish I had my old phone, I’ve got some great Memes for all of that seal stuff. LOL
     
    PANDEMIC likes this.
  16. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    7,526
    1,165
    113
    The SEALs I encountered, seemed to have MOSTLY very standard small arms. A few exceptions of course, and they could get some unique stuff that may have been mission specific. But for handguns, Berettas, and Sigs were kind of the norm.
     
    PANDEMIC and Caveman Jim like this.
  17. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

    4,355
    7,706
    113
  18. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

    7,076
    3,093
    113
    RIGHT LEFT LOAD!!;):cool:
     
    PANDEMIC likes this.
  19. utf59

    utf59 Member

    679
    2
    18
    If all you want is to see the brass in the chamber of a Glock, just look at it from the side. You can see it. I guess it's because Glock chambers aren't fully supported.
     
    JimRau likes this.
  20. Wambli

    Wambli Well-Known Member

    2,342
    2,679
    113
    You picked the worlds biggest idiot as an example. He did so many things wrong that it's not even worthwhile to go over all of them. I disagree that the holster was a contributor. MANY folks use those holsters as intended with very good results (me included). This dope broke several safety rules including sweeping the safety off the 1911 as he grabbed it in the holster ( A MAJOR NO NO AND A TOTAL ROOKIE MISTAKE). All equipment worked EXACTLY the way it should have. The moron just pulled the trigger shot himself while playing with stuff well above his pay grade.

    AND my biggest issue is that he is one of the thousands of idiots out there that think of themselves as "trainers". BTW the rest of his training videos are just as funny but not nearly as entertaining since there is no blood.
     
    PANDEMIC likes this.