Problems and disappointment

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by ArmyGuy, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. ArmyGuy

    ArmyGuy New Member

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    I was in my local gun store today and saw (my future new toy) the RCBS charge master combo sitting on the shelf all alone. I couldn't in good conscious allow it to stay there, so I brought it home. All I wanted to do was use it sometime today. I charged the first case and tried to seat the first bullet of the batch (of 50). Long story short, the bullet wouldn't seat because my die was damaged and didn't size the neck properly. After fixing that, I took the de-priming pin out (my cases had good primers in them) and started resizing my cases again. On the 10th one the collar as I call it ripped off of my case leaving it stuck in the resizing die. After about two hours I had the stuck case removed and the rest of that batch resized.

    After trying my shortcut and learning my lesson from the school of hard knocks. I de-primed/sized all the cases, throwing the primers away. They are now in the tumbler again and I will re-prime and charge them tomorrow hopefully.

    Has anyone out there ever had that problem with the collar ripping off like that? It was a new one for me. And I am by no means ruling out operator error, as I have only been reloading for about five months now.
     

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  2. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    Looks like you didn't have enough lube on it and the case got stuck. The problem isn't that you ripped off the rim of the case the problem is why. Not enough lube. Probably happens to everyone at least once. :)
     

  3. Dan308

    Dan308 New Member

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    yep case lube problem. If you have a tough time sizing the case, you'll have a tougher time getting it out of the die. Try different kinds of lube till you find the one that works for you.
     
  4. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Insufficient lube. Even though they were previously (almost) sized, they need lube. I would never risk running a rifle case though a sizer die w/o lube. Some handgun cases, but never rifles. Too much surface area.
     
  5. ArmyGuy

    ArmyGuy New Member

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    I totally agree with you..... now. This will definitely go in my stack of lessons learned. Sadly I usually have to learn these things the hard way so I can experience the results, or lack there of first hand.
     
  6. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    if your using a alcohol based spray lube not waiting for the alcohol to evaporate will do the same thing as too little lube
     
  7. Dan308

    Dan308 New Member

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    Had that problem with Cabela's spray case lube. Had to wait too long then didn't work that good. Back to RCBS case lube-2. works every time.
     
  8. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I have had problems with Cabelas case lube as well. Now if I use it, I use plenty of it, and let it dry for a couple of minutes.
     
  9. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    Yes, I had this exact problem once. I was loading for my .270. I was using a small-base die because my rifle is pump action. I did not put enough lube on the case. This was in the days before the nice spray lube was available. I was using one of those old pads that you lube and roll the cases on. I got a case stuck in the die and a guy who said he could help me ruined my die trying to get the case out. I had to buy another sizer die. I progressed to the Hornady sizing lube that is applied with the fingers and that worked better , then went on to the Hornady One Shot spray lube. This stuff works great.
     
  10. oldtymer35

    oldtymer35 New Member

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    I have never used any of the spray lubes. I've been reloading since 1950 and I continue to use the old fashioned method - an RCBS Lube Pad and RCBS case lube. I will admit that I had two cases stick in the resizing die over the years, and both times it was because I forgot to lube the case. I also invested in a stuck case remover after the first incident.
     
  11. billt

    billt New Member

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    I'm not understanding the problem you fixed with your damaged die? Perhaps you could elaborate a bit? If it's not sizing the neck properly is it due to the die not ground to the correct size? How did you fix it? Also, remember it is very important to lube the inside of the case necks. If you don't the expander plug can easily stick in the case neck and cause that. I make it a point to take a Q-Tip soaked in case lube and lubricate the inside of each case neck individually. It really is the only way you can be assured each one has proper lubrication. The expander plug should pass through the case mouth with very little force.
     
  12. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    Most reloaders have that issue at one time or another. Lack of lubricant
    is the main problem.

    A few suggestions, make sure you lubricate your cases well. Also clean the
    die out well after each use and leave a light coat of oil or rust preventive on
    the die in storage, dirt and rust will increase friction and likelyhood of a stuck
    case.

    I use the same system it works well and no waiting for cases to dry. With
    larger rifle cases I lube every case I have learned with .223 Remington, I only
    need to lube every 3rd case, there is enough carry over between cases.
    That speeds up resizing.

    Powdered Mica works well and eliminates the possibility of getting liquids in
    the case that could cause a misfire.
     
  13. billt

    billt New Member

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    The problem with powdered Mica, and most of the other "dry lubes" is they don't work anywhere near as well. They will also wear your expander plug out much quicker. This especially holds true with large Magnum chamberings. I have adapted the process of using Alcohol / Lanolin based case lube on both the inside of the case neck, as well as the outside of the case. I don't worry about any liquid contamination because I tumble all of my brass after the resizing / depriming operation. I've found over time it really is the only way to remove all traces of case lubricant, and completely clean the primer pockets.
     
  14. billt

    billt New Member

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    One other thing I would ask is what brand and type of case lube are you using? Some brands are much better than others. Hornady "One Shot" is notorious for causing problems like this. While some use it with success, most avoid it. If you read a lot of the customer reviews of it on websites like Midway, you will see a lot of complaints like yours.

    I've tried them all at one time or another, and found Dillon Case Lube to work the best.

    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/23666/catid/8/Dillon_Case_Lube__8_oz__Bottle_

    It comes in a pump bottle, and is very fast and easy to apply. Like most of these types of lubricants, it is diluted in the bottle with alcohol, and applies very thin. It disperses itself around the case. Then as the alcohol evaporates, (this takes less than a minute), it becomes very tacky and adheres to the surface of the case. Of all of these type of case lubes Dillon's D.C.L. gives the best results.

    I use a couple of rimmed cookie sheets to spread my brass out on, then spray. You don't want to go overboard and use too much because it can build up on the shoulder of the case and cause hydraulic "denting". This will occur when too much lube builds up on the case and cannot be compressed between the case and the surface of the die itself. It will then push the case in causing a dent to appear at or near the shoulder of the case. This doesn't hurt anything, but it is a sign of using too much case lubricant.
     
  15. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    That's also how I operate.. The old fashioned way. Another thing: Using too much lube can cause problems too. Also, carbide dies are the only dies where you do not need or use lube but carbide is only used in pistol dies so that don;t matter much here :)
     
  16. billt

    billt New Member

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    You still are required to use case lube with Carbide bottle necked rifle dies, (.223, .308, .30-06, .50 BMG). Especially on the inside of the case neck. If you load straight walled pistol brass with a Carbide resizer die, then it is not required. Dillon sells many of their larger progressive machines with a Carbide die option for rifle calibers.
     
  17. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    LOL.. You can see how long it's been since I bought any dies :D
     
  18. ArmyGuy

    ArmyGuy New Member

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    Forgive me if I get some of the terminology wrong. I believe what I fixed was the expander plug. Where it screws onto the rod, it had split several times as if I had screwed it on too tight. Because of that it was expanding the neck of the case to the point I could put the bullet into the case by hand and still be loose. I took my dremel and ground it down so that it would work properly again.

    I will have to try the Q-tip idea on the next cases I size. The most difficult part of sizing for me has always been when the expander plug is coming out of the case.
     

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  19. ArmyGuy

    ArmyGuy New Member

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    I am using Hornady one shot. It's what the guys at my local gun store recommended, but I'm definitely willing to try others until I find one that works well for me.
     
  20. Model70

    Model70 New Member

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    I've only ever had this problem with Hornady dies. I got some Hornady One Shot and problem solved.

    I only use RCBS resizer dies now though. All I use is the RCBS lube and pad and I've never had a problem, and I never have to worry about any lube fouling my powder or primers. I do like the Hornady bullet seater die better, but for resizing RCBS is the best.