Primers

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by SwampDonkey, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. SwampDonkey

    SwampDonkey New Member

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    I was shooting my .40 s&w this weekend with some hand loads that I assembled. Out of 100 rounds there were 3 that were duds all the others shot flawlessly. I was using remmington primers kept my work area clean and washed my hands before priming brass. Any suggestions ?
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Are the primers set too deep? Could just be bad primers.
     

  3. beaglesam

    beaglesam Active Member

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    Could be bad primers I've never used Remington. How did the firing pin strike look on the primer if it was the same as the rest must be a bad primer. I have always used Winchester and have never had one that didn't go boom. Always a first though I guess.
     
  4. Richz99

    Richz99 New Member

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    Are you shooting a Taurus PT-100? If so, it could be a light strike due to the firing pin block not fully disengaging in SA if you press the trigger reallllly slowly.
     
  5. steve4102

    steve4102 New Member

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    Nine times out of nine this is due to NOT seating the primers deep enough.

    Did you try and fire them again?

    Did they go bang on the second or third attempt?
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2012
  6. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    sometimes the primers get contaminated with the case lube(if you lube the cases).
     
  7. tri70

    tri70 New Member

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    Did they sit out before you started reloading? I know its best to keep in a bag or can and very dry place.
     
  8. SwampDonkey

    SwampDonkey New Member

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    I was shooting a springfield xdm I know the primers were deep enough. I dont know what to deep is to be honest the firing pin mark looked the same as the rest. I clean the cases after I resize so lube is out of the question. I also fired them a few times each never went bang. I appreciate all the help.
     
  9. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've used Remington primers exclusively for the last 30 years. Never had a problem with one.

    IME, most of the time misfires are caused by seating to shallow and the primer not "bottoming out" in the pocket, or seating too hard and crushing the priming pellet in the cup. Do any of your unfired rounds have slightly crushed primers?
     
  10. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    ive found remington primers to be unreliable. remington ammo in general is pretty aweful.

    mileage may vary
     
  11. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I had a couple boxes of Remington large rifle primers. I used them to load up some 30-30 rounds for a used mossberg I had just purchased. I kept having to hit each round 2 or 3 times. I thought it was a bad main spring on my lever gun. So I bought a new one. Same problem. Then I loaded some 7-30 waters for my Contender. Same problem. Then it dawned on me...hey wait a minute, those are the same primers my 30-30 wouldnt shoot. I switched to CCI. Problem solved. I really think it was just a bad couple of boxes. It was right after Obama got elected and no one could keep up with demand. I bet quality control suffered.
     
  12. billt

    billt New Member

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    +1

    Over the years I've used Remington primers more than any other brand. 95% of the time when you have a misfire of a handload, it is due to either the case itself, (dirt in the primer pocket), or else the way in which the primer was seated. If you religiously clean your primer pockets, and use care in seating your primers deep enough to bottom out in the case, you won't have any misfiring issues.

    On some rifle cases you need to square out the bottom of the primer pocket to remove the small radius that can cause inconsistent primer seating. On pistol cases I've never seen a need to do this. Most of the time it's crap in the primer pocket that causes this to happen. If they are military cases the crimp on the primer pocket can cause issues that will cause this if you don't remove it before reloading.

    A while back I read a good article on primers and how they're manufactured. It takes a lot to contaminate them. Primer manufacturers do all sorts of crazy things to test them. From soaking them in gasoline and motor oil, to WD-40, water, and just about everything else you can think of. It's really unbelievable how much it takes to deactivate them. It's nowhere as easy as one would think.

    Forcing a primer into a primer pocket, (not removing a crimp in a primer pocket), can crack the primer compound inside the cup by flattening it. This can cause a misfire by having the primer compound itself detach from the cup under the anvil.
     
  13. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I guess we've had opposite experiences. The only primers I've ever had any problems with were CCI.


    And that was many years ago.