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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A buddy and I are brand new to reloading. We have a Lee 1000 progressive reloading set for 9mm. On some of our completed rounds the primers aren't mounted flush to the bottom of the brass. By that I don't mean they stick out a ridiculous amount but you can feel it better than see it. Are those few rounds safe to fire? The over all length of the round is with in the specs set by the Lee Reloader booklet and the Lyman's recipe book we use.

If they aren't safe to shoot could we put them back in the Primer seating section of the reloader to seat them deeper? Thanks!
 

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What you'll find if the primers are not deep enough is that the weapon will not go into battery due the primer touching the bolt face and causing head space issues. They will go bang just getting them to feed will be the problem. Run them through the press again and ever so gently seat them deeper. Don't get violent with it. If you do get violent you may think about dawning eye pro if you haven't done so already. Lol
 

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NO NO NO!! High primers are not good. They can cause chambering issues and potentially slam fires.

The type of primer has absolutely NOTHING to do with this. Small primers are dimensionally the same, be they rifle, pistol, mag or standard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you do get violent you may think about dawning eye pro if you haven't done so already. Lol
Actually we wore face sheilds, we were slightly nervous, it was our first run lol

Are you sure you have the right primer? Not small magnum or small rifle.

Did you clean out the primer pocket of carbon build up?

If both of those are yes, run them again or get a hand priming tool.
They are the right primers, unless Remington mislabeled lol. Well, thats one thing we didnt do was clean the pocket. We figured since we were using once fired brass we didnt need to.

I think part of the issue was the reloader arm; Lee made 'improvements' to the arm. Its not the wooden ball anymore its a thinner rod that bends at a 90° with a padded handle. Definitely not as firm as the wooden ball handled one. Felt like we were going to bend the new style handle.

Ok, thanks fellers! Ill let him know to run them through the primer seating phase again.
 

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Unless you're shooting bench rest rifles you do not need to clean primer pockets.

Progressive reloaders have no provision for cleaning pockets and their ammo is as good as single stage.
 

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I am not familiar with the Lee progressive, but my Dillon has an adjustable stop to regulate how deep the primers are seated. Check to see if you need to make an adjustment.

Cleaning primer pockets is not mandatory but I do it almost every time, just to insure reliable ignition. Using the Dillon, I make a pass just sizing/decapping. I then check primer pockets and clean as necessary, inspect for flaws, remove any primer pocket crimps as necessary. THEN, I load.
 

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I have a Lee Pro 1000, you have watch for powder spilling on the primer seating pin. This will cause primers to seat off center and will give you the raised effect.
 

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There is no way I would try to reseat a primer in a loaded round. That is asking for an accident. You only need one "Bang" to turn all your neighbors into your enemys. I would pull the bullets and start over.
 

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Risking a loaded round going off in your press is not worth it. Pull those rounds, reseat the primers and then reload them. Try and figure out what is going wrong though. This shouldn't be happening.
 

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When i 1st started not that long ago I happened upon a singlestage RockChucker. It had the lil primer arm on it already so i figured i was good to go. Buying new brass i figured id have no problom seating the primers for my .45acp brass.

I popped one in and lowered the shell onto the arm with a good amount of force, noticing i couldnt feel it seat what so ever was strange. Going to pull it out it wouldnt come outta the shell holder it was so high. Cranked on it again and this time it came out.

On inspection i noticed it wasnt quite there still!! Putting it back in fora 3rd time did the trick, but i still could not "feel" it seat. I tried this with maybe 3 more new pieces of brass with the same result. I stopped my whole operation and waited till i could try a hand primer.

Upon gettin the hand primer i noticed right off the bat new brass was stiff to push them in, but i could actually get a feel for it and they seat perfectly almost %100 of the time.

i just wasnt comfortable with using the press after multiply tries, so now i sit on the couch and prime the night away.;)
 

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Modern ammunition is loaded for use in semi auto firearms. The primer pockets are crimped in to hold the primer during unsupported cycle. The primer pockets should be swagged with an RCBS Combo Tool or something that will remove the crimp from the pocket.
I have found the LEE presses lack the leverage to over ride and seat a primers in these crimped cases.:)
 

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I am not familiar with the Lee progressive, but my Dillon has an adjustable stop to regulate how deep the primers are seated. Check to see if you need to make an adjustment.

Cleaning primer pockets is not mandatory but I do it almost every time, just to insure reliable ignition. Using the Dillon, I make a pass just sizing/decapping. I then check primer pockets and clean as necessary, inspect for flaws, remove any primer pocket crimps as necessary. THEN, I load.

I remove the primer stops and throw them away.

Primers should be seated to the bottom of the pocket.

Robo, try a couple of thousand without that extra step. I'll betcha you'll never go back to it. :)
 

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Feel the primer seat..

Seating primers is an acquired "Feel".

A properly seated primer will actually "Crush" the primer cup into/against the anvil of the primer assembly. This usually will place the primer BELOW flush with the case.

I have seated primers for 40+years on a RCBS RockChucker press with GREAT results. Yes, it takes some pressure on some cases, but you can "Feel" the primer seat.

I sort my brass per Mfg. head stamp, and batch prime that way. When you are on the same brand of brass, you will get the same "Feel" as you go.

Slightly "Unseated" primers will not "Light Off" a round, unless you have a firing pin problem in MOST guns.
On some guns,the first strike may seat the primer, and the second strike set off the load?? Wolf primers come to mind on this complaint..NOT seated properly-first strike seats-second strike sets off.:p

If I were you--First step--get a QUALITY PRESS...Bill.:confused:
 

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For the few rounds that I load on the single stage press, I use a bench mounted RCBS priming tool. I've used both LEE and RCBS hand priming tools in the past, and this bench mounted tool is a quantum leap superior.
 
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