Prepping Tip

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by TLuker, Mar 9, 2013.

  1. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

    3,937
    2
    38
    I thought this would be the perfect time to offer a tip to some on prepping, which is grow your own food. See picture.
    Pepper.jpg Tray.jpg

    That's my first plant to pop up this year. It's a ruby red bell pepper. There are 144 little trays to go with that one and many of those have multiple seeds that will produce multiple plants. I have a lot of other things that will be planted later in the garden without using starter trays. These are mostly early season things and I'm just getting a head start with them since we don't have much of an early season here. I'll also replant some of these in the fall and they will carry me through most of the winter.

    I won't be buying vegetables this summer so I'm saving money. I've also been working hard on the storage side of things so that I won't have to buy many veggies in the winter either. My goal is to get to the point that I'm proving almost all of my own meats, fruits, and vegetables. And everything there is heirloom so I can save the seeds to replant next year.

    I'm eating healthier, I'm saving a lot of money, and I've increased my quality of living because the food I grow taste much much better than anything I can get out of the grocery store. Not to mention I love doing it. It doesn't get any better than that, and for me that is what prepping is all about.:)

    There are several here that are way ahead of me on the gardening side of things, but for those not into gardening you should really think about it. It really isn't difficult and doesn't require that much time or space.
     
  2. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

    5,417
    0
    0
    I have one bell pepper plant, it's hybrid, going on three years. We haven't bought one pepper sence. Same with the jalepeno....as for saving seeds, If your lazy, just freeze the whole fruit or vegatable.....Then squeeze onto your hot bed three months before planting time.... Tomatos work well this way, and cukes.....If you are a fried green tomato freak....Add plenty of bone meal into the hole before you plant, The tomato will not turn red......Add plenty of bone meal to your cukes, onions, and beans......do not put with your mellon crop.....
     

  3. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,312
    1,632
    113
    Thanks for the tips.! Having trouble with peppers ? I can get everything else to grow , but peppers , not so lucky.

    Had the soil tested in 05 , read some articles that suggest "Wood-Ash and Urine" ! Guess I need to have a couple of beer and barbique parties..! :D
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,455
    596
    113
    Just a quick note to expand on something the OP said- HEIRLOOM.

    If you are NOT an old hand at gardening- much of the produce you buy is a hybrid- a cross between two different varieties. The Big Boy tomato is one such hybrid. Nice tomatoes- BUT- if you save the seeds, and try to plant them- you will NOT get Big Boy tomatoes- you'll get Cherry Tomatoes (Big Boy is a cross between Cherry and Rutgers)- they revert to one of the parents. Most sweet corn- likewise.

    However, if you shop around for HEIRLOOM species, they are NOT hybrids, and WILL breed true. Save seeds from a Mortgage Lifter or Cherokee Purple tomato, you get more of the same.

    And if you are just starting out as a novice gardener, find a copy of Square Foot Gardening. We used that when we lived in Colorado, and a 4'x80' garden gave us fresh produce, and enough surplus to can and freeze.
     
  5. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

    7,719
    201
    63
    TLucker,

    That is great! Does anyone have a particular brand of seeds that is the recommendation?
    Also has anyone done any research on, or have experience with Aquaponics?

    03
     
  6. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,312
    1,632
    113
    Well C3shooter , I see many people having issues with store bought produce , like not growing at all and not just me !
    And thanks for that (HEIRLOOM0 tip..! ;)

    Thank you (Monsanto)..! :confused:

    This year , I want to try a new way to me ,to grow celery and onions !
    Been doing a lot of home work and research in all areas. The pioneers , they did it , we can to..! :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
  7. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

    3,617
    0
    0

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
  8. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

    5,417
    0
    0
    shelf life..........

    I've got punkins sitting on the back porch that i picked last fall. They are still edible and the seeds ready to plant in the spring. Punkins are a great food source, easy to grow, and last with out freezing or canning, or you can put into jars that will last for years if done right.....:)
     
  9. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

    3,617
    0
    0
    A cup of 1" cubes of pumpkin meat also has 30 calories.

    2,500 / 30 = 83 cups.
     
  10. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

    5,417
    0
    0
    fat people need to eat more punkin.....Spiced with cinamin only......:eek::D
     
  11. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

    4,823
    0
    0
    We grow three pretty good size gardens between three families. More than enough for all of us. We just grow what works best in any of the three plots. And can, dry, freeze like maniacs. WE need to do more taters this year though. I've run short and I'm sad.:eek:
     
  12. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,312
    1,632
    113
    Thinkers and do-ers , that's what it takes........! Passive unless provoked..!
     
  13. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

    3,937
    2
    38
    Good point and good link! Seed saver exchange listed #1 in your link is my favorite source of seeds, besides local. Local heirloom seeds are the best because they will have become suited to your climate and soil conditions, but they can be tough to find unless you just happen to know some country folks that have done this their whole life. They will have seeds that have been passed down for generations, hence the term "heirloom". But there aren't many of those folks left and that is another reason I like seed saver exchange.

    As that way of life disappears so are a lot of the different varieties that have been passed down. I think the most extreme example would be apples, which I've just started learning about. There used to be over 16,000 types of apples. Today their only around 3,000 left. People are actually collecting different types of apple trees to try and save what are left. In the super market you see maybe 6 types? The same thing is happening with all of our fruits and vegetables just not on that scale.

    Seed saver exchange is great because they have rare varieties, and many different types of various plants. One of the great things about gardening is that you can try a lot of different types of a particular vegetable. You aren't limited to just what the store sells, which often aren't the best to begin with. Stores sell items that ship well and grow fast (most economical), and not necessarily what tastes the best.

    A lot of the different types of different fruits and veggies also have different uses. Arkansas black apples used to be very popular. I had never heard of them until just recently when I got interested in apples. They produce an apple that is supposedly hard as a brick and tastes bad (never tried one), but that's only if you eat it when it is picked in the fall. They are supposedly quite good if you store them until after Christmas. They were so popular not because they were the best tasting apple, but because they were the best tasting in the dead of winter which was a real treat at one time.

    A little side note, having a large diversity of different fruits and veggies is a good thing from a prepping standpoint. Most of what we buy in the grocery store comes from just a few varieties. That's not good. Can anyone say "Irish potato famine"?

    That was also a great point about calories. I haven't done the math yet, but the best bang for the buck with calories is probably going to be corn. Wheat or other oats might be further north, but in my climate I'm guessing corn? Corn is what everyone here used to grow the most of and has been a staple of our diet in the south for a long time (grits and cornmeal items like hush-puppies and corn bread). Soaked corn cobs used to be pretty popular as well but the Sear Roebuck catalog quickly replaced them as the most popular item in the outhouse.

    From an economic and time standpoint, corn and wheat are hard to justify growing yourself. They take up a lot of space and you need a mill for flour and corn meal. Flour and meal are two of the cheapest items you can buy in a grocery store. But for prepping you really need to be able to grow and mill both.

    Also for prepping, I've read that the Indians used to refer to corn, pumpkin, and beans as the three sisters. They would plant all three together. First the corn, and then let the bean run up the corn stalk, and finally the large leafs of the pumpkin (or squash) would shade the ground and keep it from drying out. The beans also put nitrogen in the soil which corn uses a lot of. That was supposedly a staple for many tribes. :)
     
  14. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,455
    596
    113
    Hock DOES have a good point- If you are planning to get seriously into doing your own food- you need to have a basic understanding of nutrition.

    While I DO love my peppers, onions, squash and tomatoes- they do not carry the heavy end of the load for CALORIES. They ARE going to carry the vitamin and mineral end of things- BUT- you are going to need protein and carbohydrates. A LOT of carbohydrates, and a little protein.

    Protein CAN be animal (milk, meat, cheese and eggs) Legumes are also really high (I grow peanuts and beans) But what stokes the furnace is mainly carbs. Try living on a pure diet of venison or fish- and if you are not an Eskimo (different metabolism) you are going to starve to death.

    Carbs generally equal grains- rice, wheat, barley, rye, oats. A gardener may not have room, knowlege or equipment to grow, harvest and process grains. But there are two sources you CAN handle- corn and taters. Corn- grown to maturity, dried- will store well. Souce for corn meal. Potatoes- can grow a LOT of long storage carbs, MOST animals leave the plants alone- and a million Irishman can't be wrong!

    The main course might be a steak- but it is the cornbread and biscuits that will get you through the day.
     
  15. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,312
    1,632
    113
  16. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

    4,484
    121
    63
    How do you guys control the pests? Every year I seem to get into a war of attrition with the birds and insects... Nothing seems to scare the birds off, Ive tried all kinds of things, but here in the desert it seems food and water trumps all their other survival instincts.. (I wish I could just sit in my garden and blast them all with my shotgun!! :mad: )
     
  17. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

    5,417
    0
    0
    SHORT ON TATERS....we used to plant one thousand pounds of seed potato's..... we had them in every bodys corn crib that had room.... Never got rich on the diggings..... but we had taters year round..... Brings back bad memorys, having to go thru a barn full of rotting taters in the fall, and find whats left to plant in the fall......fall taters don't make like those in the spring......Ain't nothing beats fresh taters and green beans, with salt pork......;)
     
  18. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,312
    1,632
    113
    The birds and four legged types ,"deer" and such , Pie-Tins blowing the winds.
    Bugs , I'm asking my neighbor about that with pen in hand , they seem to have the answers!
    Back at you..!
     
  19. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

    4,484
    121
    63
    ##^$%$!!! I had a bunch of lettuces sprouting for the past week, and this mourning their almost all gone!! :mad: GRRR!
     
  20. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

    4,484
    121
    63
    My fence keeps out the ground critters...

    Ive tried to hang shinny noisy objects, but it works for like two days, and the birds catch on... (Like I said, I think food and water in the desert is worth the risk of getting "eaten")

    My barn cats patrol my garden but they cant catch them all! :p