PRACTICAL accuracy.

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by locutus, Apr 30, 2013.

  1. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There are many ways to determine this, I guess. I'll share mine.

    I like to go off into the woods or mountains and hike with my hunting rifle on my shoulder.

    I'll spot a stump, or a notch in a dead tree, at 250-350 yards (by gusstimate,:D)

    Raise the rifle and fire. Use a tree or boulder to rest the forearm against if possible. Fire 5 shots.

    Now I get the range finder out and range in the actual distance.

    Then go down and measure the group size.

    WHOAA!!! My 1/2 MOA rifle/load is now a 4 MOA rifle load.

    Do this when you're hiking alone. It can be embarrassing!:eek::eek:
     
  2. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Locutus,

    Wind, Light and Mirage also can cause this easily at 250-300 yards. And certainly the caliber is effected by the wind. What caliber you speaking of?
    5.56 is much more vulnerable than say a 30 cal round.
    I have been at sniper school and seen 7 different range flags blowing 7 different ways in 600 yards. Add to that peaks and ridges and thermal winds in a valley and there you go!
    03
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013

  3. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have been doing something similar to what you do for MANY years. I taught my sons to shot under 'field conditions' this way. I call it 'rock hunting'!! In the mountains of CO there are A LOT of rocks, so I would pick out one and try to estimate the distance and hit it first shot under real field conditions as if it were the KZ on a game animal. It is a real eye opener to those who try it.:D

    Sorry, I meant to quote locutus!!:eek:
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
  4. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Usually using a bolt Win. 70 .30-06 with hand loads. 6X Swarovski scope.

    I found that whenever I get a little "cocky" about my marksmanship skills, this returns me to reality quickly!:eek:

    Without the flags and without using the range finder makes it a challenge. But it's a good drill, It sure makes me believe that all the time and effort I expended learning to stalk was well worth the effort! :D

    Jim, I taught my son the same way in Wyoming. We've got lotsa rocks too.:p
     
  5. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Save the rocks; practice on bears and wolves.



    Yes, my friends and I do much the same when plinking, though not at such distances.
     
  6. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    locutus,

    That is great practice and a learning experience being in the field and not stationary with bags on a good bench. We neither, always used range flags but it sure taught us a lot about the winds capabilities and was used as a training tool. And as you said to prove to us no matter how good you think you might be mother nature has an abundance of factors that can KYA! ;) Of course a little different between using Duplex Reticules to range on a hunting scope compared to Mil-Dot Scope. But they can be used for basic range estimation. With the Mils we used the 27.8 formula. Better than the old long formula where you needed a math degree to correctly estimate. But as I said, even with the 30 cal round with a full value 10+ MPH wind you can be an inch off at 100 yds.. So out in the field at 250-350 the wind can have a different effect on each round depending on the wind and the wonderful field rest you have.:D
    Have fun! Keep Shooting! How is the weather in the Big Sky Country today! Finally getting warm in TN.

    03
     
  7. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Locutus,It's very true. Most people that shoot sub-moa groups off a bench probably couldn't hit an eight inch pie plate at 200 yards off hand because they never practice doing it.
    It takes a lot of practice field shooting in real conditions to come close to anything you can do off bags and a bench.
     
  8. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    I couldn't agree more. :)

    After I get a gun dialed in and shooting the best I can get it I make it a point to shot from various positions at the range from then on (standing, kneeling, sitting, and prone). And it is humbling to take a rifle that you know is driving tacks and all of sudden you're shooting all over the place because you got rid of the bench. Can't blame the gun at that point - and that's knowing the yardage.
     
  9. kalboy26

    kalboy26 New Member

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    I've found that around 200 yds is my comfort zone when standing, and up to about 300 if I have a rest (tree limb or something). I usually get sighted in on a bench and then try and practice how I would really shoot before hunting season. It always sucks, cause I'm terrible at guessing distance.
     
  10. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    For a hunting gun the only shot that matters is the first shot(in field conditions).
     
  11. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    About 90 percent of the rounds that I fire in practice are offhand or offhand with field expedient rest.

    A good low cost drill I use often is to throw out a handful of spent 12 or 20 gs, shotshells and "keep then rolling" with the 10-022.:p sounds ceasy, but..........

    My thought is that if I can hit the target standing, then shooting from kneeling or sitting is a piece of cake..:D

    Prone is very seldom practical in the hunting fields, so I use it very little. Besides, if I have time to get into a sling and go prone, I have time to stalk closer.:)
     
  12. Intheshop

    Intheshop New Member

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    Just be aware that when shooting on steep grades that there is a slight problem.No,not referring to the up and down,gravity phenom.....that's well known.


    It's how trees grow out from a slope.We see it when shooting instinctively with bows.I've always been told(confided with,serious national and world champion field archers)to lean your upper limb "into" the mountain.The slope/trees will play tricks on the brain when shooting "sideways".Harder to describe than to show or demonstrate in the filed.It may not show up when using a scoped rifle(single plane)but is at issue when using irons.You basically aren't holding rifle level.
     
  13. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Shooting up or down hill is another one of those things that ya gotta "learn by doing.":)
     
  14. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I will try to use a rest of some kind and not shoot off hand at game, however I can hit a moving target off hand better than I can a stationary one!:)
     
  15. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    Prone comes in very handy here for power lines and gas lines. Those are the most common places to get a long range shot here, but you better be ready when a buck steps out because he won't be there long. :)
     
  16. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    I truly believe a lot of people could if they only knew how far ahead of the target to aim.;)
     
  17. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I embarrass myself so badly each time I

    go to the range, I don't see any point in

    over-confirming in the field that which I

    already know so well...;)
     
  18. bamashooter68

    bamashooter68 Member

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    I use a rest when I test loads for accuracy and when Im checking a rifle's accuracy. All of my shooting is done the way pop and Uncle Sam taught me. That's the way I teach my kids. I grew up Quail hunting so being able to move and hit a moving target was a must. I also use a grip pod on some of my rifles which helps in many shooting situations.
     
  19. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Hiking and shooting in the high country is great practice for the fall hunting seasons. Shooting Rock Deer and Stump Elk up in the high meadows also allows for scouting out future hunting areas. ;)
     
  20. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Is it light enough 'at the edge of darkness' to do that????:p