Powerstroke vs. Slide Release, 1911

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by The_American_of_Zone_9, Feb 26, 2014.

  1. The_American_of_Zone_9

    The_American_of_Zone_9 New Member

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    My dear fellow handgunners,

    I bring good cheer and glad tidings to one and all on this festive Wednesday morning.

    I come seeking your knowledge about a concern I have with my 1911. But first a bit of background...

    While at the firing range and working through my third box of ammo of the 500 round "breaking-in" process. I came across a double feed after my initial reload. Since I powerstroke in order to release the slide, I switched to pressing the Slide Release instead whereupon I had no other issues with double feeds.

    Now, my question is...

    Is pressing the Slide Release better on the 1911 than a powerstroke?

    I hope to hear from each and everyone of you regarding this most pressing matter. I prefer a powerstroke in order to keep my muscle memory more uniform since I alternate carrying my three different handguns throughout the month. However, if powerstroking my 1911 is going to cause a jam then I'll happily switch to pressing the Slide Release.

    Best regards,
    D.Idaho

    Note: the photo above is of the 1911 in question, a Charles Daly Bul M-5 Commander in .45. along side a 100 Quetzal bill, Guatemala currency.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2014
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Double feeds are typically magazine issues. Pulling the slide back and releasing is the same action that happens when its fired but at a slower rate allowing more time for a weak or improper built or improper designed magazine to pop extra rounds. Its a common issue with double stack 1911 magazines
     

  3. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    The slide stop (the part you are calling the slide release) has the purpose of stopping the slide when the magazine in empty.

    The notch in the slide that the stop goes into can become rounded if used as a slide release.
    Maybe not right away, but with time.

    Then the slide stop will quit doing its job.
     
  4. RUT

    RUT New Member Supporter

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    I don't "do" the slide stop method of release, and see no benefit to it. (even with my Kahr!)
     
  5. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    It's fast. Speed matters in such things. If your just plunking and potting dirt clouds it doesn't matter.

    Downside is it takes finer muscle control while slingshotting the slide is gross muscle movement.

    If you always use the slide stop it becomes muscle memmory which negates the fine muscle movement issue.

    The problem with the slingshot method is new shooters tend to ride the slide causing fail to feed. Which creates big issues and a dangerous condition.
     
  6. The_American_of_Zone_9

    The_American_of_Zone_9 New Member

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    Dear Handgunners,

    Thank you so much for your input regarding my pressing concern.

    An extra special thank you to JonM for his posts, very informative.

    I'll be putting the 1911's fourth box of ammo through in March at which time I will incorporate all your fine bits of advice.

    Thanks again. God Bless. And keep America strong and beautiful while I'm away.

    Best regards,
    D. Idaho
     
  7. clr8ter

    clr8ter New Member

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    What does "power stroke" mean, in this context? Never heard that term.
     
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    He means pulling the slide back and letting go. Slingshotting it
     
  9. clr8ter

    clr8ter New Member

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  10. DynoGuy

    DynoGuy New Member

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    I'm starting to go the Powerslide method as the side benefit to this method is you don't have to worry where exactly the release lever is on any semiauto you may have to use in a shtf moment.
     
  11. RUT

    RUT New Member Supporter

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    >>I'm starting to go the Powerslide method as the side benefit to this method<<

    As long as you do it "man fashion" you'll have no problems.
     
  12. rock185

    rock185 Member

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    The_American, .02 worth from an old 1911 owner/shooter/carrier/firearms instructor/armorer. I've used 1911 type pistols from various manufacturers since the '60s. During my last several years in full time LE, and currently as a reserve, I have used the slide stop to close the slide of my 1911 type pistols during reloads. I have used this technique in competition, training, qualification, etc. Even under stress, I have never once had an issue with this, nor has the slide stop notch ever "rounded" etc. on any of these pistols. I've seen many more malfunctions induced by shooters using the "slingshot" method. I suspect this is due to the slide return to battery being variable with the slingshot technique in that shooters vary in their strength, distance the slide is actually pulled back prior to release, riding the slide forward, etc...ymmv

    DISCLAIMER: I am not a famous special operator gunsmith professional trainer, nor am I likely to get my own TV show anytime soon. Just a regular old guy that has used 1911 type pistols for some time now.
     
  13. jeffkaiser1989

    jeffkaiser1989 New Member

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    The way i was taught was to always powerstroke with JHP's specifically when re-chambering after emptying the gun as its a more fluid movement causing less pressure on the bullet resulting in less "settling" of that round. However i use both methods and dont really favor one over the other. It seems to me like alot of things with firearms its just personal preference. Remember 1911's can be rather temperamental until broken it my 1911 isnt broken yet so i still have issues from time to time. Anyway hope this helps good luck!
     
  14. pioneer461

    pioneer461 New Member

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    Just like it was designed to do. What a concept! When the 1911 was designed, pistol shooting was all one handed. The military continued instructing one handed 1911 shooting up through the 1960's. I know that because it was my job to teach that method. Colonel Cooper taught us a better way. It really makes no difference which method you use. The only "wrong" way is that which causes a malfunction. I prefer the slide release which, for me, is quicker. Also, you need two healthy, dry, unencumbered hands to slingshot the slide. A nanosecond in a gun fight is a lifetime.
     
  15. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    IMO, the 1911 was designed to be operated one handed, simply because when it was adopted by the military, they were still some horse mounted calvary, which meant using the pistol one handed.
     
  16. Dahamp2003

    Dahamp2003 New Member

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    With all due respect here, this isn't 1911, and we aren't riding horses. I don't buy the training makes fine motor skills not fine anymore, unless you train those motor skills under the same amount of stress you are facing in real life. Are bullets flying at you when you train? If they do, and you claim fine motor skills are no longer fine, you might think differently when the SHTF. Also, you're Al assuming you will have the same 1911 when it does hit the fan. What if you have a SIG? A glock? Powerstroke = works. Slide stop = could be in a different spot on the gun. Look at the variables.
     
  17. mdwalkerjr

    mdwalkerjr New Member Supporter

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    I've got 2 1911s, 3 HKs and a Beretta and the slidestop is in the same location on all 6. Right where the thumb naturally goes on it's way to a natural grip.


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  18. Dahamp2003

    Dahamp2003 New Member

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    Ok. Then the slide stop would probably be OK for you to use. I have a Springfield XD 9, and it's way closer than the 1911. I'm not trying to argue with anyone here. I realized my last comment may have sounded a little smartass, but that wasn't my intention. Just want everyone to consider all the variables with philosophies. Weapons evolve, training evolves, philosophies evolve. I mean, remember when people said glocks were crap because they are plastic ? Or that you need iron sights before a red dot? Well, what's more likely to fail? And acog with tritium/fiber optics in it that's coated in rubber that's shock proof, water proof, dust proof, etc? Or a plastic magnum MBUS sight that can break when you hit it on a humvee door? I just don't want people to be so close minded in their philosophies. After all, the only way to truly get better is to test out alternative theories, proving or disproving each one. I can't use the slidestop, because muscle memory messes me up. You can. See why that's not a blanket statement that's true?
     
  19. mdwalkerjr

    mdwalkerjr New Member Supporter

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    I'm a big believer in whatever works for someone is what they should do. For me the slide stop works better. And thank God for my two red dots and my Trijicon Accupoint 1 - 4. ;-)


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  20. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    merely pointing out how the design of the 1911 came to be in the beginning, and the reasoning behind it.

    i am not making assumptions of any kind, simply pointing out some historical reference.

    i happen to be quite familiar with the pistols i own and use.

    sorry i spoiled your parade.:mad: