Powder burn ?

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by cblowe13, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. cblowe13

    cblowe13 New Member

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    Wouldn't say I'm new to guns but don't really understand some things. Why is it that in a 357 magnum snubbie the recoil isn't much more than a .38? I believe I heard something about the powder not having long enough to explode or something. So would the recoil of a .357 magnum in a five inch barrel be alot more than the snubbie?
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Recoil is governed by the weight and speed of the bullet, balanced by the weight of the firearm.

    Many snubbies do not have enuff barrel- gasses are still expanding when bullets leave barrel. However, there are loads designed just for snubbies- faster burning powders, lighter bullets. That is where the 125 and 110 bullets came from- originally 357 was 158 gr.

    I have some .357 loads you do NOT want to shoot in a snubby- trust me.

    Try this- when you load the cylinder, load 2 357 rounds in separated position, fill in the holes with .38 Special. Spin cylinder, and without looking, close it. Now shoot. I think you WILL be able to pick out the magnums.
     

  3. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    powders are sorted by burn rate, hence faster burning vs. slower burning. modern smokeless powder doesn't explode, it burns creating pessure that forces the bullet out the barrel of a firearm. slower powders generally need longer barrels to complete the burn inside the barrel to optimize muzzle velocity. faster burning powders are made for shorter barrels to acheive those same results. as a general rule, faster powders can generate the pressure much quicker, resulting in a sharper felt recoil many times.

    but there are other factor to consider as well. bullet weight and weight of the firearm all figure into how felt recoil is percieved. so it;s not just one thing but a mixture of many different variables that affect how a firearm recoils when fired. with pistols, the size of the pistol along with it's grip can affect how well a person can control it's recoil. having the right grips on a pistol can change how well you control recoil and how well you hand absorbs and controls it.
     
  4. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Recoil is determined by the total 'mass' expelled from the muzzle, and 'velocity' of the mass.
    There are two parts to this equation. One is what most people only consider, this is the projectile, mass and velocity.
    The second, and most overlooked part, is referred to by many as the 'rocket effect'. This is the mass and velocity of the propellant (gas) expelled. This is why a muzzle brake changes the 'felt' recoil of a firearm , it bleeds off part of this 'gas' at right angles and lessens the 'rocket effect'.
    I don't know which revolvers you are referring to as I have shot MANY handguns with short bbls and the 357's have A LOT more recoil than the 38's do!!!:confused: So I disagree that the 357's recoil only slightly more than the 38's. :confused:
    The 'gases' leave the bbl at velocities which are much greater than the projectiles (5000 to 6000 fps) and the mass of the gas is equal to the powder charge weight. So you can see why any cartridge which uses more propellant will have a sharper (higher recoil velocity) recoil.
    More propellant equals higher projectile velocity AND a greater 'rocket effect' thus greater actual and felt recoil!:)
    Hope this helped,
    Jim
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2013
  5. cblowe13

    cblowe13 New Member

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    Thanks fellas helped me out alot
     
  6. cblowe13

    cblowe13 New Member

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    And actually the snub I have that I don't feel much of a difference on is a .357 taurus model 605. Shoot it and see or since you have shot MANY handguns I'm sure you've tried it my apologies. I haven't tried this in any other snubbie when I shoot with long barrel there is a very significant difference.
     
  7. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My son got one of the super light 2 inch 357's and you can not hold it on target with full house 357 loads. :eek: Every time you shoot it, no matter how you grip it, it will twist about 30 to 45 degrees in your hand and you have to totally re grip it to fire a follow-up shot.:( 38 +p, no problem. Why they even make this light of a gun in 357 is beyond me???:confused:
    Now my 2 1/4 inch Ruger SP101 will handle the full house 357's, with a little training and practice you can shoot it quite well, but to me there is still a BIG difference in the felt recoil between the 357's and the 38's even in this 'heavy' snubby! ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2013
  8. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think the key word here is 'feel'. Some are more sensitive/aware of recoil than others. ;)
     
  9. captjack75

    captjack75 New Member

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    .357 Recoil

    I have a .357,2", poly frame. I usually mix the .357 and .38spl and as someone else posted, you know when you hit the .357. In fact if someone else is shooting my gun, I can tell when they hit the .357 load.