Potential tragedy.. :/

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by dada2d, Nov 2, 2012.

  1. dada2d

    dada2d New Member

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    So , while at our local pawn shop I over heard a call from a person who had just bought a .357 revolver from them.
    Apparently the new owner of the gun was wondering how to uncock the gun...!!!
    He had it loaded and the hammer was back ready to strike a live round!!!
    They informed him on the phone about the procedure to make the hammer return to its at rest position. I was shocked at what I was hearing!! The new owner was wondering if it could go off like that!!! Omg... I couldn't belive my ears!!! Apparently the guy was scared to do what they told him to do on the phone, and was bringing it back to them for them to show him how!!!!
    A freakin .357 Magnum being transported with a line round in it and the hammer back!!! WTF??? I can't belive that they sold him that gun when apparently the guy had no idea about any kind of gun whatsoever!!
    Can you imagine what a mess this could have been???
    I left the shop, and called the next day about it. They told me that he made it there and they showed him how to do it and sent him on his way...:/
    I would have had his money ready when he got there and taken that gun back , and told them not to come back to my shop!!!
    Any idiot can buy a deadly weapon.. I feel slightly less safe ....
    I carry every day, and am a responsible gun owner.. Only takes one mistake to change a life...
    Still in shock!!!!
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    unfortunately there is no law against being stupid.

    the rest of us just pay for it by giving up freedom
     

  3. SatoriNoir

    SatoriNoir New Member

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    In my opinion, the new gun owner made the mistake of not asking the pawn shop how to operate the revolver PRIOR to buying it.

    Whenever I visit a LGS and I ask to look at a gun I have never played with before, I ask the person helping me to demonstrate it's functions first before even handling it.

    If I were in the pawn shop's position, I would have told him to leave the revolver in a safe place at home and to gcome back to the pawn shop so that I can safely demonstrate how to uncock a similar revolver being sold in my shop that is unloaded.

    Or you know, just watch a YouTube video...
     
  4. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Training! Training! Training!

    The pawn shop owner missed a chance to earn a couple of bucks training the buyer.
    All it takes is a couple of questions when selling the firearm.

    Even on transfers, I ask the buyer if they are familiar with the action.
     
  5. KG7IL

    KG7IL Well-Known Member

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    Yes, basically true. I find this better than having some in the government determining if a person should be 'allowed' a gun.

    I believe the statistics would show our method works best for maintaining / retaining our right to bear arms. I don't think I can point to ANY country that has a better model.

    I surely don't want to see any new laws. are you ready to pay for, take the time for, or accept the restricitons of a program to ensure that YOU are knowledgable. You may say that you know, but any idiot could say that they know.
     
  6. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    I had a similar incident. I was in my gun shop recently and two men had just bought a pistol and the background check had just cleared. I sort of smiled and asked what they had just bought.

    "I don't know," one told me, "its a nine milimeter."

    Nine milimeter is a magic word on the streets of Memphis.

    Bob Wright
     
  7. kytowboater

    kytowboater Active Member

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    I've never been asked if I knew how to operate a gun I've purchased.
     
  8. Shannon1976

    Shannon1976 New Member

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    Loaded, hammer back and ready to go. I don't know who is dumber the customer or shop owner...can't believe he asked him to return to the store WITH the gun. So many things could have gone wrong. Glad I am not one of his customers.
     
  9. DoyleTheDog

    DoyleTheDog New Member

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    I went to a friend of a friend's house a while back and saw a shotgun sitting in the corner of the room. Asked him if it was ok if I looked at it and he said yes. Before I even touched it I asked if it was loaded and he looked right at me and said that it wasn't. I grabbed it, pointed it in a safe direction and pumped it to double check. Sure enough a shell came flying out!!! I racked it till it was empty, set it back down in the corner and then I left. I always try my best to avoid stupid people, but it's impossible to avoid them all the time.
     
  10. Moby

    Moby New Member

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    The gun owner needs training PRIOR to loading a gun.

     
  11. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Owners manuals are available for free online. There is no reason for a gun owner to load a weapon they are not familiar with.

    Tack
     
  12. robertb6112

    robertb6112 New Member

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    That's why it's always a good habit to do research on a gun before you buy it. And no matter what always make sure a weapons clear and safe no matter if it's been sitting around for years in a safe. It's better to be safe then sorry.
     
  13. SatoriNoir

    SatoriNoir New Member

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    I'm a firm believer in doing informed research before making any kind of purchase that constantly involves possible life-threatening risks.

    For example, I would never recommend anyone new to motorcyling to go straight away and buy a racing bike before knowing even the most basic understanding and functions of how to ride one.
     
  14. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Sounds to me like the STORE owner could use some training.
     
  15. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It would have violated the man's Constitutional rights to require him to know how to operate the gun before buying it. The seller had no responsibility for regulating the sale either. Neither did the shop owner have any responsibity to assist him in decocking it. Giving the man advice about how to decock the gun over the phone probably opened the shop owner up to litigation if the thing had gone off and winged another idiot. If the shop owner allowed the guy in the store with the loaded and cocked weapon, he was as big a fool as the buyer.

    If being an idiot was legal justification for denying a person the right to own a firearm, then far fewer people would own then own today. If you don't believe that, I suggest you visit an unregulated public range. Our local "public range" is worse than Dodge City, on cowboy payday.

    No firearm regulation folks, remember?
     
  16. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I am not saying that training is mandatory.
    I am not saying that every buyer needs a certificate "Firearms Trained".

    But there is money to be made if people don't read the manual.
     
  17. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I think they can tell by the way a person talks and handles a gun if they are familiar with firearms or if they know very little.
     
  18. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Whether they care is another story.
     
  19. Shannon1976

    Shannon1976 New Member

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    I agree but sometimes people are more interested in making $$ than safety.
    Sad
     
  20. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    So, is it your judgement that the seller should somehow evaluate every potential buyer before closing the deal? If so, just what criteria would you suggest he or she use? Would it be fair to make a snap judgement about a buyer? The only thing the buyer should ever have to provide is the necesary legal paperwork.

    I believe that, once the buyer has met the legal requirement to buy, it is all the buyers responsibility, not the sellers. Otherwise, every FFL would have his or her own method of making the determination, and would then be responsible for the firearm after the sell. That would be an awful system.