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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
Are you looking for an American dog owner, or an American car?
American DOG OWNER

the car can be made anywhere in the world but has to be street-legal for American public roads

Elegance and roominess notwithstanding, the best new car for the money in 1979 would have really been a Toyota truck with a shell on it if you were a bachelor with hunting dogs, German shepherds or something back then. For city-slickness without the Mercedes price tag, the quality-built 1979 wagon would have been a Toyota Cressida wagon or perhaps a Volvo wagon. There was just no getting Detroit big boat size combined with Toyota quality and reliability and the body and interior excellence of European cars like the Benz. I give the '79 Chevy wagon the nod for roominess, style and comfort at a working-class American income budget but for nothing else.
 
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Discussion Starter #23
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Discussion Starter #26
Convertables are not good dog haulers.
1965 Plymouth Satellite convertable, top down. Dirt road. A bit of the ganga. Happy doggie on rear seat. Big bump. Friend "hey, where's your dog?"
She eventually caught up.
View attachment 232052
Wagons and pickups are practical: convertibles are not.
 
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Discussion Starter #27
Had a Buick Sport Wagon- about a '72 I think. Lots of room for kids and dogs- not the most elegant car I've ever driven- but had a pretty respectable 351.

Also drove a 69/70 Lincoln. Electric floor mats, power ashtrays, upholstered turn signals- (just kidding about the turn signals) But it DID have a 460 engine, and drove like it was on rails. LOVED that car!
How was the body, paint and interior quality on that '72 Buick? The fit and finish of cosmetic components? Did it have a cheesy vinyl dash with exposed foam rubber from cracking in the sun like a lot of late '70's GM cars did? Open the driver door and note the sticker or plate that has the vehicle manufacture's name and the year/month the car was built on it. Most American brands had a cheesy paper sticker to that effect that the print would wear off over time. Actually Chrysler Corp. had a better quality metal door builder plates (federal safety certification) whereas GM and Ford had paper ones. Most if not all the foreign makes, like the '75 Toyota Corolla wagon my family had, had a riveted metal build plate with the date stamped in metal. Often the quality of the vehicle was in proportion to the quality of that builder plate inside the driver door. The Chrysler build plate however was too good for such crappy cars otherwise. By 1979 Mopar was the scum of Detroit scum. Ford had a better quality sticker than even GM. The print at least held up better over the years of weathering and car washes. I had a new 1983 Camaro like a damn fool. Within a couple of months, the print on that door sticker faded almost completely out just from washing the car. If I could go back to 1983 again, I would go straight to my hometown Toyota dealer and buy a new fully-loaded Corolla Deluxe wagon.
 
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At age 19, I owned the largest, most luxurious car of my lifetime. Shiny, shiny black with at least 500 pounds of chrome, hand-operated spotlights on both sides, real red leather seats, door panels, with a tan headliner. It had a folding jumpseat in the rear and a huge
Cadillac -V-8 engine. 1954 Cadillac "Bluebird" hearse. Paid $165 for her, right out of Morton's Funeral Home. Cops made me take the red lights out of the grille but it still had the mechanical siren. Now THAT was a car with a lot of room that other people gave a lot of room to. Lots a people couldn't help peeking the the rear windows. Always had that "funny funeral home flower smell". Sold it, bought a 1957 Harley-Davidson 3-wheel "servicar" with a springer front end and a "45" motor - towed it 35 miles from Columbia Mo. to Jefferson City behind a Volkswagen Beetle with a rope, but that's a whole 'nother story.
 

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Volvo, 140 or early 240 series wagons, with the B20 engine. The later 240s with the B21, had some reliability issues with the engines and transmissions. The B18 and B20 series engines were the ones that Volvo built the million mile club on. WE had 450,000 on mom’s 69, when some drunken clown hit it while parked at the curb, and totaled it.

Those wagoners were “Boxy But Good”. My younger brother moved an entire apartment in his twice.

Actually I’d like to get one of the later ones and swap in a ford small block, and transmission into it. It would be a pretty good sleeper.
 

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I've always wanted a Checker Marathon.

You would be able to open all four doors at the quarter carwash and spray down the interior.

Built for the taxi trade. They had a steel body with bumpers like I beams.

Yellow ain't bad.
 

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I've always wanted a Checker Marathon.

You would be able to open all four doors at the quarter carwash and spray down the interior.

Built for the taxi trade. They had a steel body with bumpers like I beams.

Yellow ain't bad.
Built in Nashville.
A friend in high schools father had one. Bought new to haul his 6 kids around.

I'd clean my '62 Dodge crew cab that way. Open all the doors and spray the whole thing down. Roof, doors, seats, and floor. Northern Arizona was DUSTY. Cinder dust from the volcanos.
IMG_20180619_103422.jpg
 
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