piston vs. gas

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by tbruins37, Jan 21, 2012.

  1. tbruins37

    tbruins37 New Member

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    Which system is more reliable?
     
  2. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    The piston system is more reliable.
     

  3. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    i assume your asking about ar15's. about the same. reliability depends on quality of the individual firearm and what the owner does to maintain it. you dont care for a firearm it wont run, doesnt matter which system you use.

    fewer things to go wrong with a di gas system.
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Really, I don't know and I don't care, I just suspect this is going to turn into a huge argument and flame fest, so I just figured I'd be a smart@$$. Sorry OP, please forgive me.
     
  6. Chandler51

    Chandler51 New Member

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    Damn you trip!! :D
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Can't help it sometimes. I've been a bit moody today too, I could be doing a lot worse! :)
     
  8. Chandler51

    Chandler51 New Member

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    I own both and have never had a problem with either. But then, I don't do anything real "rigorous" either. I suspect they both would do just fine if I did though.
     
  9. goretro77

    goretro77 New Member

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    I will not participate in this as it will just become a flame war.
     
  10. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Both are equally reliable. Benefit of a piston system is a cleaner bolt and receiver since the "dirty" gas is not dumped back into the receiver like it is with a DI system. Downside to the piston system is the reduction in follow up accuracy and muzzle climb caused by the piston's motion. But then again, fewer moving parts begets reliability...

    Let the games begin...:p
     
  11. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    It seems most fall on either the "AR accuracy" or the "AK dependability"

    side of the line.

    While ARs are, IMO, great rifles, I'm just not a fan of their

    more complicated field-strip.

    Which, I guess, makes me an AK type...
     
  12. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Push rear receiver pin, rotate upper, pull charging handle, remove BCG, remove bolt from BCG...

    What the hell is complicated?
     
  13. Chandler51

    Chandler51 New Member

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    Might be a lil' more daunting to a 12 year old conscript who rode his goat to the "gun store" :D
     
  14. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Maybe so, but I could never get the bolt back into an AK quite right...
     
  15. Chandler51

    Chandler51 New Member

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    And to your point, I really don't see the difficulty in the AR field strip.
     
  16. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Don't Care...:rolleyes:

    Durring 6 years of Infantry service the D.I. system on the M16 A2 worked flawlessly. Thousands upon thousands of rounds fired with ZERO malfunctions. The only hickups I ever experienced with D.I. was during MILES training using blank ammo and blank adapters which literally vent POUNDS of crap back into the receiver.

    Never a hitch with live rounds.:)

    Are piston guns easier to clean...sure they are. But I'm not willing to fork over and extra $400 to $500 for a piston upper and accept the added muzzle rise that comes with them.

    If ease of cleaning is the reason people consider piston guns they could save a lot of money and have a more controllable rifle by simple upgrading there bolt and bolt carrier to a stainless steel unit.;)

    TACK
     
  17. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Neither do I. I was pleasantly surprised when the DI on Parris Island showed us how to do it.

    And if I recall correctly, the BCG only consists of the bolt carrier, bolt, and firing pin. Once the firing pin is out, remove the bolt key and pull the bolt, and then a smaller pin to remove the extractor.

    What I can't remember after not having touched that series of weapons in the past 7 years, is exactly how the firing pin comes out...I'm sure I could figure it out at a glance if I come across one though...

    Cotter pin?
     
  18. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Yes, pulling the cotter pin on the port side of the BCG allows the firing pin to drop out the rear of the BCG

    TACK
     
  19. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Damn I'm good. I haven't broken one down since my last qualification in 2005.
     
  20. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    Field stripping an AR is difficult? Really?