Pistol stance.

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by jjfuller1, May 7, 2014.

  1. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    We hear it preached to us by instructors, professional shooters, and just good marksman. You've all heard it. Proper grip and stance when pistol shooting. On the other side of the spectrum we hear don't conform to others. For example type of gun,ammo, or caliber. We say pick what gun works for you and what caliber your best with. So with that said what do you guys think on this? Should we say if you shoot better with a different stance than the pros you should ignore it and do it the "right way"? Or shoot with what your good with??
     
  2. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    You learn about the basic techniques, then you choose what works for you. Get the best score, and no serious instructor will muck with your stance.
     

  3. jakeball

    jakeball New Member

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    I know grip pertains to recoil direction. You dont want recoil traveling down your thumb, you want it down your arm.

    As far stance not too sure, i like to shoot in real world situations so my stance varies all the time.


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  4. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    if something works for a person, it just doesn't make good sense to me to change to something some might think is more proper or right.
     
  5. therukh

    therukh New Member

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    Stance

    It depends on how much shooting instruction my students have had before they come to me as to how much I work with them on stance. I take them through what we use in competition and later work with them on off-balance, awkward stances, similar to what you might have to use in an unexpected self-defense encounter. Weaver, modified Weaver, Isosceles, etc. are just steps for a new shooter to take to find what he or she likes best and, more importantly, what works best for them. Any competent instructor will make sure their students have some stance that will help them deliver accurate, rapid & possibly sustained fire from different positions. Just a note, I had a student who was a computer store owner who kept starting out in a good, solid stance and, when the buzzer sounded, got up on his "tippy toes" to shoot. I did work with him till we broke that habit. It did not work for him and, upon seeing videos of himself, he declared that it looked funny too!
     
  6. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    Of course. One handed, close quarters, on the move, they are all different. You need the stance in a qualifier (or a match) to shoot your absolute best.

    It's like boxing. Punching is not the foundation, it's the legwork. There is only a certain way to position your legs to keep moving and stay balanced at the same time. Once you got that down, you will hone your personal style.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
  7. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I don't believe that we are lemmings jumping off a cliff.

    I know what works for me in different circumstances. I teach, but I adapt my techniques to the individual I am teaching.

    Not everyone is the same physically or mentally.
     
  8. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you assume a stance, you are exposed and not moving which makes a good target. It is not hard to hit a target from a good stance but if that target is moving and shooting back your stance is going to get you killed. You need to be able to shoot from any position you may find yourself in including strong and weak side and maybe even rolling on the floor. My first shots will be as the gun clears and is pointed in the right direction. This is why a gun must point naturally anytime every time. (Why I dont own Glocks.) You cant be fumbling around with your grip. You should be able to look at a target, close your eyes, bring the gun up, open your eyes and it should be pointed at the target. You need to be able to do this from any position, one or two handed, strong or weak even if you are twisted.
     
  9. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    good info and thoughts.. it just seemed to me that we never hear this from the pros. kinda had me thinking.
     
  10. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    I will say: if you did not have any Professional training in many years, and you sign up for classes as a "Refresher" of your skills, it's nice to hear from the instructor that you have a good stance or grip.


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  11. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Lots of competitive shooters are big on the isosceles stance. When they shoot only one shoulder is behind cover, center mass is exposed. Yet, you never hear a RO say "cover" when they are shooting. Apparently cover is only for some shooters. Once you are in the clique you are bullet proof and do not need to shoot from cover.
     
  12. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    So far the only stance help I have needed to give was with a few female shooters as they wanted to lean back. I showed them how to lean into it just a little and they saw the difference quickly. Now I show them more about shooting on the move and from cover and see what happens.
     
  13. Get the basics

    Grip: One cannot control a handgun without a strong and correct grip on the handgun. However, correct and strong grip does not happen by accident. One must learn how to apply and maintain a grip. So the early teaching and learning (one hopes) is a bit different than advanced grip acquisition. In slow fire target shooting, one acquires a proper grip in a deliberate and intentional manner. When drawing from a holster in self-defense, the acquisition is a different process, but hopefully the results are much the same. (That's the point of the early training.)

    Also, since not all people have hands, fingers, wrists and forearms of equal geometry and strength, the actual grip on the handgun will of necessity be somewhat different for each individual. However, all grips (verb, in the meaning of gripping the handgun) need to control the handgun in acquiring a sight picture (or pointing), firing and recoil recovery. Similarly, all grips (noun, as in what one installs on the handgun to separate frame from hand) need not be identical, depending on firearm, individual hands and sometimes the purpose.

    A similar concept applies to 'stance'. One must learn to position the entire body in such a way as to provide maximum control of the firearm in both aiming and recoil recovery. Therefore, when learning, one is taught to stand erect with the head erect, feet so far apart and firmly balanced... and so forth. Self-defense may require a rather quicker assumption of stance. Self-defense - or hunting - may require 'other' positions, such as kneeling, prone, supine or recovering from a fall.

    I strongly suggest the student of the handgun begin with learning basic target skills. Once a control and familiarity with the handgun is achieved, one may progress to self defense and other forms of ad hoc shooting. 'Grip' and 'stance' make more sense in this fashion.
     
  14. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    As far as stance is concerned I have been a "Weaver" guy for many years. As philosophy has changed I have tried to go to an isosceles stance. It has been difficult. Isosceles makes use of MY primary cover, body armor. Weaver allegedly makes the shooter a smaller target.

    There are some faults to the Weaver philosophy. While standing straight on to the opponent may make you a larger target, getting shot straight on generally means you will be shot in ONE organ. Getting shot at an angle is more likely to involve more than one organ (lung, heart, lung or liver, stomach, pancreas). If only one organ is involved, liklihood of survival is much higher.

    The problem with isosceles is when shooting from behind hard cover. Weaver is a better suited for this.
     
  15. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    My wife has always been a good shooterfrom her .22lrs to her 357 dw revolver but one thing has held true for her even with her cc pistols. She is not a two handed shooter. Always been far better off squared up to the target , sort of a squared up one hand hold ,with handgun slightly tilted , maybe 15*. Her groups are 50% smaller shooting that way.
     
  16. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Your 'stance' will very with the type of shooting you are doing. Look at a bulls eye shooters stance and compare it to a defense stance. If we are discussing a defense stance I teach a 'basic' fighting stance (bent knees, crouch, weight forward) and let the individual student adapt to it as their build, strength, and technique dictates. I believe the most important part of shooting in general, especially hand gun shooting, is trigger control.:)
     
  17. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I learned to shoot from the weaver stance. I am certainly making better use of available cover than a shooter in an isosceles stance. What the isosceles stance does for me is allow me to back up much easier and naturally.

    Learning to shoot from both stances would be an advantage to any shooter. Learning to shoot on the move could save you from being stabbed or beaten with a club.
     
  18. sweeper22

    sweeper22 New Member

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    Here's what I think about pistol stance-

    For the competition shooter/marksman type: You should have a go-to stance. It should probably be rigid and repetitive, as is the case with most muscle-memory skills. Tedious details are critical.

    For carry and defense: You should shoot how you're comfortable shooting. We all have different bodies, balance, agility, tendencies, etc. In a flight or fight moment, I'd prefer to be well-acquainted with shooting in a less rigid and more instinctive approach. Your shooting habits are critical in that moment, but so are half a dozen other issues (situational assessment, cover, escape, collateral risks, etc).
     
  19. Staidan

    Staidan New Member

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    This may sound funny, but I have found a martial arts stance the best for me personally. It is like the weaver stance, but broader with knees slightly bent. Since I have some MA training, it was natural, and it's quick to move from or with. Interestingly, I ran across a Max Michel video where he was describing his stance, and it sounded very similar. Just a thought.


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