Pistol case trimming

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by SmokyMtnHiker, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. SmokyMtnHiker

    SmokyMtnHiker New Member

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    I was curious if I would need to resize pistol casing, assuming I don't load to the max?

    Bottom line is, i'm trying to figure out how long I would need to reload to pay for the equipment start up cost..

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  2. anm2_man

    anm2_man Member

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    I have to assume you are asking 3 different questions in your post.

    1 - Title "Pistol case Trimming" - You should never need to trim a pistol case. It will split before it gets to long.
    2 - "Resize Pistol Cases" - No matter what load you use, the pistol case will always expand to fill the chamber of your weapon. So after every firing you need to resize the case.
    3 - "How long does it take to get my money back ?" - Well it depends on how much you shoot, but for example If you are talking about 9mm and I assume you already have once fired brass.
    The average cost for primers, powder and projectile is around $.10 to $.12 per round. I you buy a Dillon SDB press (now there are cheaper press, but I don't have the prices at hand) it
    Costs $380 complete for one caliber ie: 9mm. So for a 1,000 rounds your reloading cost is $110 + $380 = $490 or $.49 per round. Now you can buy S&B for around $.21 per round.
    For 5,000 rounds, your reloading cost is $550 + $380 = $930 or $.19 per round. You see where I'm going. Now there are other costs. You need to clean your brass which requires
    a case cleaner, you media to use in the case cleaner, you need tub's/boxes or what ever to store the brass. But basically in less than 5,000 rounds, you got your money back. But
    Mileage may vary.
     

  3. SmokyMtnHiker

    SmokyMtnHiker New Member

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    Yes! You disifered my encoded question lol..I didnt realize how confusing my question/statement was. Thanks.

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  4. phildenton

    phildenton New Member

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    if you really want to save money go with the lee loader, takes more time to make as many rounds, but make your money back within the first thousand rounds [depends on how much you shoot too, great for occasional shooting, also great for noobs, like me]
     
  5. scottybaccus

    scottybaccus New Member

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    I've never needed to with my .45 ACP.
     
  6. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    Same here. I have never needed to trim my .45 acp cases. I have shot them as many as 8 times and they did not stretch. I guess because of their short stubby design this is not an issue.
     
  7. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    most pistol cases are straight walled, so using most published load data, they don't tend to stretch like bottlenecked cases. my 44 spc. and 44 mag. cases have never been trimmed, but i do check them to be sure.
     
  8. scottybaccus

    scottybaccus New Member

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    I believe another factor is the type of crimp used. A roll crimp that digs into to bullet at all will have more purchase on the case and cause more stretch. A factory style taper crimp is more easily slipped as the bullet makes it's departure and imparts less influence on the case.

    I simply spot check about 5% of my cases after cleaning, and about that many loaded cartridges as I box them up, for dimensions and weight.
     
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    the Lee dies i use for reloading pistol cartridges use the factory crimp die. the 44 Mag. i reload for gets a crimp because it's a magnum and i just don't want any shifting in the bullets, and my 45acp gets crimped to insure reliable feeding from the magazine.
     
  10. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Sometimes they do but its not common. Every load cycle of the current thousand or so cases i use for 45acp 1 or 2 need a trim as they wont go into battery. Since its range ammo i dont care its good stoppage training. I just segregate those 1 or 2 rounds pull em trim the cases at the next loading session and toss em back in the mix.

    Ive got cases ive been using for 20 years. Sometimes a few show splits and get tossed.

    Cost reduction doesnt really play a factor it just lets me shoot more for the same money i was going to spend anyway.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2012
  11. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    As has already been posted, cases "generally" do not need to be trimmed very often BUT it's always a good idea to check all the same. Generally there is a lot of leeway in over all case length that precludes the need for trimming but as Jon points out, sometimes it can cause issues going to battery if the case is too long.

    Having a collectors ffl, allows that I get my reloading material at almost wholesale prices so I save a moderate amount of money rolling my own. Most times it is less than $10/box on pistol ammo plus I have the satisfaction of knowing that all my rounds are the same (consistant in quality) :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2012
  12. noylj

    noylj Member

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    What we need is a clear question.
    If your bullet does not simply drop into the case (i.e., if the inside diameter of a .45ACP is less then the 0.451" diameter of the bullet) and if your slide has enough force to jam the case in the chamber, then you may not need to resize.
    However, in most cases, if the case mouth is NOT larger than bullet diameter, then you are shooting a very low pressure load or the outside case diameter is too large or the chamber inside diameter is too small (you may have ammunition that is too tight in the chamber to allow the case mouth to open enough to release the bullet without chamber pressures going up to a dangerous level).
    Of course, my own feeling is that if 99.999999999% of reloaders always resize their cases, there might just be a reason for doing it.
    This falls apart, however, with cast bullets. Almost all bullet caster size their cast bullets. I haven't done that since the mid '80s and have not seen any reason to go back to that time-consuming and, often, accuracy-destroying activity.
    Somewhere in the rant, I hope I addresses whatever the real question was.
    PS: You only trim RIMMED straightwall cases , that head-space on the case rim, so there is a consistent case length for roll crimping. Semi-autos use a taper crimp and the cases never need trimming and they are, in fact, too short to begin with and shrink with use...
     
  13. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    The OP's questions was on trimming case's not about resizing which is something you must always do and is automaticly done when you run them through the reloading die...

    Case trimming applies to all cases, btw, not just straight walled cases... :) As a general rule, I always check case length during part of my process of reloading. It's just become part of my routine. Having all of your cases the same length, IMO, attributes to consistant performance.