Picking a reloader

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by colmustard, May 28, 2010.

  1. colmustard

    colmustard New Member

    1,237
    0
    0
    So I am wanting to start reloading ammo, and I was hoping you fine folks could point me in the right direction, as far as what brands of reloaders and models are best and easiest to use, and any other equipment I will need to get. I am mainly wanting to reload .45 acp, .40 s&w and 9mm. Thanks for any help.
     
  2. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

    9,663
    4
    0
    You'll hear mixed reviews on Lee equipment and while it is not the best out there, I would reccommend their 4 hole turret to get started. It is an inexpensive way to get started and see if you like it. I've been using mine for 2 years with no issues.
     

  3. Missileman

    Missileman New Member

    491
    0
    0
    I'd suggest a Dillon Square Deal--a little more to start with than a c-press, but it comes with ones set of dies and will last forever, plus you can't beat Dillon's customer service.
     
  4. SDiver40

    SDiver40 New Member

    16
    0
    0
    Not sure where you want to start out and how much you want to spend, BUT the Dillon is hard to beat if your looking for a turret press. As stated above, customer service is top notch!

    IF your thinking about a single stage press, then I would look at the RCBS. I been using one for around 20 years and I just cant wear the darn thing out.
     
  5. jeepcreep927

    jeepcreep927 New Member

    1,105
    0
    0
    Far as I'm concerned, for a progressive press, Dillon is the only game in town, but you pay for it a little more up front.

    RCBS and Redding for single stage are both hard to beat but the Redding is a little pricier.

    Good luck.
     
  6. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    4
    0
    I would say start with a turret press. Everyone here knows I HATE Lee products. If you are not sure you want to keep reloading them get some lee stuff and try it out. Reloading stuff keeps its value rather well.

    I prefer RCBS or Dillon. There are plenty to choose from.

    Loading pistol ammo on a single stage is a PITMFA big time. Seeing as you want to load nothing but plinker pistol ammo a progressive is the way to do I would say get a 550b you can run it single stage till you get familiar with the steps of reloading pistol ammo. Then you can switch to doing it progressivley. The 550b is what I call semi=progressive as you have to rotate the shell plate and load the bullets and case. A full progressive like the dillon 650 all you do is load the bullets. even better is one that loads the bullets and cases as well then all you have to do is pull the handle and make ammo.

    Let us know a budget and space requirements you have. Progressive presses have much larger footprint than a simple RCBS rockchucker single stage.
     
  7. colmustard

    colmustard New Member

    1,237
    0
    0
    Thanks abunch for all the info! I think I am going to go dillion, I like the turret design. was looking at the 550 or 650, and am going to order some manuals, so i can educate myself, lol, space isint a probloem because we will be putting it in our garage on a work bench, i cant wait to get this started! I am very excited!:D
     
  8. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

    2,361
    1
    0
    I started out with Lee products (IMO a good press to start with) and they worked just fine until I starting reloading for the bench. I still use Lee dies, although, I now use a RCBS press.

    Dillon 650 is top of the line and capable of reloading around 500 round per hour, although, it's going to cost at least $1000.00 to get started reloading one caliber, I sell Dillon products.

    If your sure this is a hobby you want to pursue by all means invest in the Dillon, if not sure about reloading, start small and work your way into it.

    Disclaimer: This is just one man's opinion and does not reflect the views of many on this forum.
     
  9. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

    2,706
    4
    38
    Can't go wrong with the RCBS Master Reloading Kit for starters. I have a Redding press now and it's real good also, but a little more money.
     
  10. Fuzzball

    Fuzzball New Member

    62
    0
    0
    Personal tastes aside, all presses will make fine ammo and last a LONG time with just a minimum of care; you really can't go wrong with any of them. What volume of ammo you need, and the level of precision you may seek, is a larger question.

    Single stage presses are quite simple devices and the best to learn on. They are the easiest to load preciesly with and to change loads with. They are slow but loading speed is NOT a friend to precision loading.

    Conventional turrets (Lyman/Redding) really add no significant speed to a loading session, especially if you load for more than a couple of calibers. All the heads can do is store a few dies. However, Lee's turret presses have an "auto-indexing" head that does speed reloading and they can be used as single stages as well. Lee's turret heads are inexpensive enough to have them set up for each caliber, swapping them can be done in seconds without tools. Many people love their Lee Classic Turret (iron/steel body), it's massively strong and fast too.

    Progressives are great for cranking out the same load by the hundreds or thousands. Not so good for changing calibers, nor so easy to vary charges in the pursuit of accuracy either. But, they ARE fast!

    Perhaps the best route for a new guy is to get a strong but low cost single stage and learn to load well first. Later, if he wants more speed he will still have uses for a single stage and will also have the experience to make a better choice of any new press he may be interested in.

    IF I were doing the buying for a friend he would get either a Lee Classic Cast single stage or the Classic Turret, depending on if his major interest is rifle or pistol.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2010
  11. vonfatman

    vonfatman New Member

    16
    0
    0
    My first press...a Dillon 650. I wanted a progressive. A safe (self-indexing) progressive. I've had mine for years. I learned to reload by reading and using this press. It's more to invest in initially, but the darn things are so well made and fast. I do NOT go fast...and 750 rounds an hour is no problem (just fill the primer tubes and have your components at hand. That means I get to spend time shooting.

    I now have a Hornady single stage for most my rifle reloading...but for handgun ammo....the 650 cranks them out!

    Good luck!

    Check out Brian Enos site to learn alot about Dillon presses.
    Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!


    Bob
     
  12. joshfireart

    joshfireart New Member

    267
    0
    0
    i started reloading to save money so i bought a Dillon 550. My first year of reloading i did not save a cent because i went from shooting a couple hundred round a year to shooting thousands of rounds a year. i started reloading 45 acp now i load for every thing i have 223 22-250 270 7mm mag 338 win mag 357mag 44 mag 45 acp. with my rifles i get nearly as good of loads with the powder measure as i do if i weigh each round. Dillon the is the way i go and if reloading not for you hang on to it for a few years and you can sell for what you paid for it.
     
  13. palabman

    palabman New Member

    11
    0
    0
    I disagree... The Lee Classic Turret is the best out there. Just do a little research and read the reviews.
     
  14. sigp250

    sigp250 New Member

    98
    0
    0
    I'm not a reloader but am somewhat interested. It would seem to me that learning how to load a single caliber would make sense rather than jumping in only to find you don't have the time or interest.

    I saw a Lee Hand Press Kit for $39.99. Why not try something like this? No laughing out loud, honest answer needed.

    It looks to be thumbs up for Dillion. What happened to Hornady?

    Does anyone use pre-primed brass?

    When you pick up brass off the floor at an indoor range have you ever been told that is not allowed?

    How do most get their brass?
     
  15. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    4
    0
    If you use that lee hand press you will never want to load anything ever again.
     
  16. sigp250

    sigp250 New Member

    98
    0
    0
    I was thinking about putting my wife to work.:D
     
  17. joshfireart

    joshfireart New Member

    267
    0
    0
    i like the way you THINK
     
  18. colmustard

    colmustard New Member

    1,237
    0
    0
    Thank you all very much for all the great responses! Very much appreciated and as always you all are on top of your game when it comes to fire arms knowledge! Me an my step father are thinking of going with the dillion 650, should be fun! I cant wait, so I can load during the week and shoot all weekend!:D
     
  19. anm2_man

    anm2_man Member

    504
    2
    18
    I hate to say this, "DONOT buy a 650 - now". My first press was a Dillon 550. My son said this was the press to buy (Oh by the way he was only 19 years old and now its 26 years ago). We (my son and I) ran the press as a single Stage press (you can do that with a 550) for a while. Then we got good at it and used its full capabilities. For the next 20yrs we reloaded thousands of rounds, and enjoyed every round we reloaded. About 7 years ago, we got into full auto Mg's. The 550 was a great machine, but it couldn't keep up with our new found fun.

    Four Years ago we bought a 650 - and Yes its super fast and now we can keep up with our needs for full auto reloads.

    PS: My son still reloads his special round (ie: Subsonic 9mm & .45) on the old 550 press.

    The point is that the 550 has its place and is really easy to use. The 650 is a real production machine, but a little harder to use and to change calibers.

    Bottom line is that if your new and looking to reload, get a 550. I have had several friends that opt'd for a 650 and returned them or a 550.

    Please note - If you order a new 650 and then want to trade it in for a 550, Dillon will probably let you do it.

    Enjoy
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2010