Picking a Bow?

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by cpttango30, Oct 15, 2009.

  1. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    Ok I am thinking about getting a bow for next deer season that way I can have some days of warmth before sitting in the wood during the freezing nov dec jan winter here.

    WHAT TANGO IS GOING TO FLING STICKS AT ANIMALS. You bet if it keeps me from having to sit in a snow storm..... I am thinking up to $600 for the bow itself.

    1. What is a good bow but not one that is going to make my wife beat me to death with it? I know Matthews are top of the line (Priced like Browning).

    2. What sights are good sights? (I really have no clue unless I can mount a Burris 3-12x32 pistol scope on them)....

    3. What rest and should I get an overdraw? Whisker biscuit? Why am I putting food on my bow?

    4. What arrows the last time I had a bow it came with arrows they were Easton camoed alum arrows....

    5. What else do I need and OMG I think there are more broad heads than bullets. Which one and why cutting tip or chisel tip why a chisel I am not cutting stone or wood with it. and a release what the heck do I really need one?
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2009
  2. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

    9,663
    2
    0
    I just bought an Alpine and I'm happy with it. It's my first bow and I was on a tighter budget then you but I took Bambi's mom for a ride in my truck 2 weeks ago thanks to it. Hit up stalkingbear, he was a HUGE help to me as I researched different bows.
     

  3. lovemy38

    lovemy38 New Member

    17
    0
    0
    John Schulz longbow
     
  4. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

    1,546
    0
    0
    I can't help you in making a choice but I will be watching this thread with interest in hopes that I can learn something myself. A guy I used to work with (big-time bow hunter...) had talked me into buying a bow since I had expressed an interest in learning how to shoot one (properly). My only experience previously was in high school, where we once shot some long bows -- and I learned that I was pretty consistent. With peeling the skin off my left forearm that is...... :eek:

    Anyhow, he tells me not to fiddle-fart around with an "economical" bow and just do it up right from the get-go and he suggested a Mathews. Needless to say, the guy at the local bow shop agreed. :rolleyes:

    So I ended up with a Mathews QXL and the Easton camo alum arrows. Never hunted with it, but drilled a few bullseye targets so it seems to put them where you point it. The one thing I don't like about it is the arrow rest they chose for me. Couple of slivers of flat spring steel with some heat shrink covering. The arrows tend to fall through the opening between them all too easily during the draw if you are not really, really careful. I think (as a newbie) I should have gone with the whisker biscuit instead - but I don't really know. The release (for me) is all too cool since I am used to pulling a trigger, and I know I don't have the skill for getting a consistent finger release.

    Looking forward to hearing the experts opinions on these questions....
     
  5. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

    4,077
    4
    38
    Sending you a PM tango-too much typing so call me and I'll be glad to help you.
     
  6. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

    7,143
    1
    0
    Coming soon to a theater near you:

    The new adventures of Robin Hood, starring the one and only Tango!

    By the way T, you'll also need to include in your purchases: shiny green tights, a cute pointed hat, and some spiffy pointed boots...
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2009
  7. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

    4,077
    4
    38
    You don't want to just pick the cheapest bow you can find, the same as you don't want to go to wal-mart to buy it. Go to a bow pro shop, tell them what you want, & want to do with it. I'd advise a "medium" price range bow. Go with at least a 7" brace height, and 7.5" or more brace height is even better. There's a BUNCH of bows on the market that will serve you well. The reason I STRONGLY suggest going to a bow shop is they will make SURE that not only does your bow fit YOU (draw length & weight), but also it'll be set up & tuned correctly. Don't get carried away with excessive pull weight-my bow only maxes out at 60 pounds. Since I'm a Mathews man, my natural recommendation would be Mission bows-an offshoot company of Mathews (meat & taters bows).
    Bows by Mission

    I'd also suggest going with carbon arrows. Don't get the cheapest, just get a dozen of whatever brand your local bow shop recommends. The more you pay for carbon arrows the straighter they are. Carbon arrows last a LONG time compared to aluminum arrows. Go with helical fletchings (vanes)-they help stabilize your arrow better resulting in better accuracy.

    Go with a good 3 pin sight that the pins are made of steel with plenty of fiber optic "cable" for brightness. You don't need over 3 pins to start with and adding more would just add to the confusion of which to select for what yardage. You don't need to be confused as to which pin to use when a deer is in front of you. Choose a larger aperture peep sight so that it'll be better in low light conditions.

    The Whisker Biscuits are excellent full capture rests for beginners but I'd recommend a drop away such as my QAD Ultra Rest Hunter series. It is full capture (meaning it's impossible to fall out of the rest), You can move them into cocked position ahead of time, they stay in that position until actual firing (even during let down), reasonably priced (50-60$), and are trouble free once installed/tuned/timed (by your bow pro shop).

    There's so many good releases on the market it's hard to get a bad 1. I personally use a glove type release as it makes it feel as though the draw weight is lighter. Most people choose the wrist type. Scott, Winn Free Flight, Tru-Fire, among others makes great releases. Have I missed anything? Neil
     
  8. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

    10,888
    1
    0
    I will add that the faster the bows shoots, the less forgiving it is. Meaning an imperfect shot can turn into a horrible shot. A good bow guy can get you set up with the perfect draw length, as you don't want a bow that is at the limit of your draw length. Silence is good with a bow, as a deer will jump upon the snap of the string. Shorter bows between axles are easier in a stand or blind. Getting a good bow for you and your budget requires plenty of research. Have fun and post some pics. :D
     
  9. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    I seen an add for a archery shop on the back of a pick up last night.

    Might go to Gander mtn and look around.

    Oh and what the hell does a peep sight do on a bow? Do you look threw it or is it just there for looks.
     
  10. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

    4,077
    4
    38
    You look through it-it serves as a rear sight the same as a peep or ghostring sight does on a rifle. I'd suggest going to an actual bow shop-unless the Gander Mountain has a real honest to goodness bow expert.
     
  11. orangello

    orangello New Member

    19,156
    0
    0
    I can't wait for the pick of Tango with a skewered rodent & large SE grin. :D
     
  12. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

    10,888
    1
    0
    Not all Gander's have good bow guys. They do try to hire and train bow persons, but...same as Wal-Mart gynecologists, I suppose. :D
     
  13. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

    1,546
    0
    0
    Re: Peep sight....
    I have (had) one of those skinny little pieces of rubber tubing attached to my peep that pulls it into alignment when drawn, but the rubber had dried out and broke in half. Can that be eliminated, and if so - how do you ensure the peep keeps it's alignment? Or is it better to just get the tubing replaced every once in awhile?
     
  14. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    I don't know if they got an expert their gun experts are a bunch of effing douche bags one almost got punched in the dam face too once. This dude told me that Leupold didn't make a 6.5-20x40mm scope and I pointed it out to him in the case he said that was not a leupold it was a leatherwood because of the L on the side......

    I have walked around their bow section but never stopped and looked to hard.
     
  15. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

    3,659
    0
    0
    Good advice from stalkingbear.

    I would add try to find a mom&pop type bow shop if you can.
    They are usually more helpful and knowledgable than your big chain stores IMO. The kid setting up your bow might have just got promoted from the camping department.
    I like small shops. Those people live off of repeat business and word of mouth-so jaggoffs usually dont stay in business for long.

    Ask their recomendations and test shoot some different models to see what you like the best in your price range. Thats why I chose a hoyt over a matthews last time I bought one. Both were quality bows, hoyt just felt/shot better for me.

    If you're not in a hurry, Id wait till after hunting season ends, better deals can usually be had and the shop will be less crowded. The owner/workers will have more time to focus on your needs. It can get crazy in there, especially right before the season opens

    The shop I go to you usually end up getting free lessons when you stop in for bow work. Last time I stopped to get my bow tuned the owner of the shop ended up coaching me on form and technique while I shot for about an hour. He completely broke down my draw, anchor, and release giving tips where needed.
    Even though I didn't ask for the lesson, it was very helpful and also FREE!

    If you like hunting, you'll love bow hunting. Better weather, less pressured game, and fewer people in the woods. .02---Ken
     
  16. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    I wanted to kind of have an idea in mind that way I can save up for one. Of course tax season is fast approaching us and I should be getting a nice chunk of change back So most will go on credit card I still am slipping some out the side to purchase a new rifle, shotgun or Bow. I really want a bow for some reason. That ought to take ground hog hunting to a whole different level. The nice thing is if I get one I have from June to september to get out to the archery range at least 4 or 5 times a week maybe even more than that. Getting paid and not having to work is effing sweet.

    The one place I was going to go and look was a place named B & B Archery B&B Archery Pro Shop

    So we will see. I hate shopping in Gander Mtn because they are a bunch of douche bags in there.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2009
  17. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    LOL how did you know that in the summer time I would be out after urban hogs with this set up and my Natural Gear SCII Camo and some face paint and a head dress....

    Tango has gone native watch the hell out people. This would also open me up to an early season urban hunt on Quantico in the Housing area......
     
  18. orangello

    orangello New Member

    19,156
    0
    0
    http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f12/you-re-under-arrest-19059/index2.html#post174634
    I see that ending interestingly. :D
     
  19. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

    13,934
    3
    0
    Any one shoot a Bass Pro Shops Red Head Bow?
     
  20. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

    9,663
    2
    0
    Nope! I will warn you, if you haven't figured this out yourself. Companies will build a bow for a large buyer, ie Bass Pro, Dicks, Gander Mountain, etc....and put a name on it. It's the same bow from shop to shop but with a different name so you can't price shop(like matresses). I agree with bear, find a good bow shop. Most of the people at the large houses(those listed above) know enough to be dangerous. Go try to learn something from them about guns, like learning calculus from a 5 year old.