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My experience with weapons is mostly military, and some gun clubs afterwords. Founds a Marlin 22 self loader on sale, thought it would make a nice start to my collection. I've heard the name Marlin obviously, it's been around seems like forever. Anybody have any thoughts?
 

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Hey Glen, welcome aboard.

.22's are great fun, and buying ammo won't require a second mortgage on your house. Marlin's have been around for many, many years. I have a Marlin model 60 that I bought in 1975, and still works good.

Beware of ammo problems. Twenty-two's are notoriously twitchy on ammo. What works in one gun, won't necessarily work in another of the same brand. I suggest you buy small quanatities of various ammo brands and see which work best for you.


 

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Thanks, I appreciate it. The Remington Thunderbolt's I've got seem to be working pretty good so far. Any suggestions on others I should try?
 

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My Marlin 60 has been kicking since about '77. I have fired tens of thousands of rounds through it. It is a bit tired now. The barrel to reciever fit is very loose but it still works. Not the most accurate but for a 30+ year old rifle that cost me about $60 new, not bad. I have not shot it in years as I have a 10-22 that is more fun but I won't sell it.

With most .22's you must clean them very well. The primary cause of malfunctions is the waxy build up and powder residue. Because of the bullet design, the bullet leaves lubricant in the action that builds up pretty quickly.
generally there will be two slots in the back of the barrel for the extractors. These slots will get gummed up. Solvent, pipe cleaners and maybe dental picks are needed to get the gunk out. If you use dental picks, be careful to not scratch anything. And, never dry fire a .22 or any other rimfire weapon. You can break the firing pin and/or ding the edge of the chamber to the point it will not chamber rounds.
 

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Yep... and just to prove pioneer461's point, Remington Thunderbolts are the absolute worst-shooting cartridge my old Marlin Glenfield 60 has ever eaten. ...or rather, tried to eat. They just do not shoot well at all. Never have. Definitely buying the smallest quantities is the cest way to go; I ran out and bought a 500-round brinck of the Thunderbolts just because they shot so well out of my brother's Marlin Glenfield 60 that he bought on the same day at the same time from the same store that I bought mine. That's even further proof of what pioneer461 wrote. Funny thing was, right after that, my brother pretty much stopped shooting altogether and I had no one that I could dump them off on. So, it was miserable. I never enjoyed a shooting session when shooting those. Every 3rd or 4th shot, at least one and sometimes as many as 4 or 5 in a row would jam. I kept blaming the rifle but it shot other stuff (copper-jacketed, mostly) like a purebred champ.

I don't shoot that rifle as much these days as I used to, but it still shoots well. Many a woodchuck has fallen to that rimfire over the past 32 years or so. Ditto that for cans and other plinking objects. Good luck with yours!
 

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My Model 60 was picky early on. It's now going on 25 years old and runs most ammo that I try to feed it. Lately, I've been have good luck with the Federal stuff that comes in boxes of 550.
 

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Have a model 60 ss and laminate stock. Shoots very well, but not as good as first model 60. Floated the barrel on my new one to the block. Made quite an improvement on accuracy. The Federal wally world ammo has work great in both of mine and its cheap. The most important thing about my 22 ammo is to always find copper plated bullets which seem to keep the action from gumming up as much.
 
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