perserving meat

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by Birchhatchery, Oct 25, 2011.

  1. Birchhatchery

    Birchhatchery New Member

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    i have been doin reserch on perserving meat but i cant find what kind of salt to use? to perserve it you just pack it in salt or smoke it correct?
     
  2. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    My great grandmother used to can meat . Sure seems pretty gross but I remember it lasting a long long time
     

  3. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    I can it, using Kosher Salt.
     
  4. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Smoking wont do it unless you can remove all the fat and make jerky. If there is any fat, it will turn rancid. Commercial jerky uses preservatives.
     
  5. Jimmy

    Jimmy New Member

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    It does look kinda bad when home canned....but so does Pink Salmon and I LOVE that right out of the can!!!

    I need to do some. Been saying I was going to, just haven't got around to it...:eek:

    Jimmy
     
  6. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Didn't the Indians(and settlers) just dry it?
     
  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Meat can be canned (pressure canner please- botulism is not good) or frozen. It is not just "packing in salt"- and smoking has to be done right.

    Non iodized (kosher) salt is best. Yes, LEAN meat can be thin sliced, dried under heat. Called jerky.

    Good topic to do some reading on.
     
  8. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger Active Member

    I'm sure you will persevere.
     
  9. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    Try canning Corned Beef. Better appearance, better taste!!

    I do roast beef - I brown it with seasonings first then cut into pieces that will fit in the canning jar

    Corned Beef - Just cut into pieces and follow the instructions for canning meat

    Tuna - I do not pre-cook tuna, just cut the loins into pieces that fit the jars, add boiling water and salt then pressure can

    Salmon - As with Tuna above.

    Always pressure can and use new lids. The chances of sealing failure are reduced with new lids.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2011
  10. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Make some jerky out of it. Easy to store and tastes pretty good.
     
  11. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Most versatile method is freezing. It will stay edible nearly indefinately if vacuum sealed and kept below 20f. It will lose flavor gradually but can be used in a wide variety.

    Drying is second best but doesnt work well with modern beef cattle. Too much fat. Works best on lean wild game.

    Dunno bout canning that just seems wrong somehow.
     
  12. adjusterr

    adjusterr New Member

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    preserving meat

    I have watched a local butcher/neighbor cure his hams. He laid them out on butcher paper and rubbed a heavy coating of Morton Curing Salt over the hams, repeating this process over a period of days. I suggest you contact the local County Extension agent or Google "Curing meat" of some similar title. It really is not nuclear science and properly cured hams will keep for many years.
     
  13. Birchhatchery

    Birchhatchery New Member

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    im talking about more as the shtf we dont have electricty what is the best way to perserve meat no of any good websites?
     
  14. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    $5 how to Dvd's

    AK State Cooperative Extension Service
    Dvd's are $5 + postage, click on link directly below
    Cooperative Extension Service | videocatalog



    FNH-00267 A Helping Hand: Keeping Your Family Safe from Botulism

    Produced by the Centers for Disease Control, Arctic Investigations Program, this video is a must-see for anyone who eats or preserves fermented Native foods. Although the botulism toxin can be found in many places, it grows especially well in foods fermented in glass or plastic. This detailed video discusses the symptoms and treatment of botulism poisoning and offers important safety tips on how to prevent botulism. It also compares traditional methods of preserving fermented foods with the current use of plastic containers.

    FNH-01280 Canning Basics
    This DVD provides a thorough overview of the basic canning and preserving process. The program reviews boiling water canner basics and pressure canner basics. Further described are the preparations, equipment, processes, cooling, storage, canning and safety concerns associated with these methods. This DVD makes a great resource for mastering home food preservation.

    FNH-01281 Canning Meat and Fish in Jars
    This DVD provides a thorough overview of the basic canning and preserving process for meat and fish in jars. The program reviews canning game meat in jars and canning fish in jars. Further described are the preparations, equipment, packing, canning, cooling and storage concerns associated with these methods. This DVD makes a great resource for mastering home food preservation.

    FNH-01282 Canning Meat and Fish in Cans
    This DVD provides a thorough overview of the basic canning and preserving process for meat and fish in cans. The program reviews canning game meat in cans, canning fish in cans as well as the process of assembling a can sealer. Further described are the equipment, preparations, packing, canning, cooling and storage associated with the preservation methods as well as the preparation, materials, maintenance and process associated with the assembly of a can sealer. This DVD makes a great resource for mastering home food preservation.