Pardon me, about these surplus Nagants.

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Wiebelhaus, May 26, 2012.

  1. Wiebelhaus

    Wiebelhaus New Member

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    I'm a bit of a rifle novice so I'd like to ask folks who are better versed than I am so are they usable? I watched a [ame="http://youtu.be/rmVJYB3uDkc"]video from Hickok45[/ame] and my interest peaked, then I saw this And I couldn't help but be eeven more interested and then checked Buds and I'm going holy smokes! this thing is 120! Now the common opinion on reddit is that they are nerd/newb rifles and frowned upon but for a person who digs history and firearms and for THAT price, are they usable? or just a neat thing to shoot a few times? Can you actually hunt with them and customize them? yay or nay? thanks.
     
  2. Wilder

    Wilder New Member

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    They don't take scope mounts as easily as most other bolt actions due to the open top of the rear ring, and most of the scope mounts for them are cheesy and barely worth the cost of installing them. Most of the ones I have seen can be very difficult to open after fireing. The large opening for ejection and the split top rear ring make the action too weak for most modern magnums. However they are cheap, the ammo (7.62x54R) is cheap, and as long as the bore is in good shape they tend to shoot pretty well. If it has your interest, buy one, and shoot the **** out of it. Buyer's remorse is easy to get over when you stop shooting because your shoulder hurts, rather than you can't afford more ammo.
     

  3. Wiebelhaus

    Wiebelhaus New Member

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    Very true and thanks for your input.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2012
  4. SmithKid308

    SmithKid308 New Member

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    I think nagants are like chips you can't only have 1 I personally have 2 and an m44 (the carbine version ) and I love them all but some you've got to be careful about shooting corrosive ammo because of the I think it's salts in the primer and I use Windex with Ammonia to clean the hole barrel and bolt but that just me , and I personally love them so I'd say pick one up and your shoulder dons't hurt that bad haha I actually went shooting today and shoot my m 91/30 today 27 times my brother shoot it 3 times , so I hope this helps you decide on this
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    A mosin can do anything a model 70 or rem 700 can, just not with the same style (notice I did not say LESS style).
    And chances are, you won't find a mosin as accurate as a current production bolt rifle. They DO exist, but good luck.
    Expect around 4"groups at 100 yards. Could be much less, or much, MUCH more, depending on how badly it was abused back in the day.
    Great rifle, Russian conscript proof, powerful round (similar to the -06, not so much the .308 as so many claim) cheap ammo....
    Who gives a damn if some folks don't like it, or "frown upon" it. Mines a damn good shooter, operates smoothly, and holds minute of beer can at 100 yards. Best $160 I ever spent in my life, gun wise (included a spam can of ammo).
     
  6. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    You do understand that ammonia is as corrosive as the salts produced by igniting the primer. It is the soap and water in windex that neutralizes the salts. Boiling water is all it takes to disolve the salt. I took my PU91/30 out 2 weeks ago. Went through 12 boxes of ammo, my son was good for 1/2. That is 120 rounds each. No butt pad except the fine steel one it came with. If you hold the rifle correctly, it is pretty timid.
     
  7. msup752

    msup752 New Member

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    I'm still thinking about getting one just to get one. With all the choices, I still have not made the leap. Dunham's has them for $99 this week and they sometime have them as low as $79. I also have a C&R license so the more expensive hex receivers are available to ship to my door. I had better make up my mind before they jump in price like so many other surplus guns!
     
  8. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Just so you know, when you use the term "Nagants" most folks associate that name with the M-1895 Nagant revolver. Mosin would be a better term for the Mosin-Nagant rifle, if you need to shorten the name. Mr. Nagant, was credited as the inventor of the Nagant revolver and was a co-inventor of the Mosin-Nagant rifle.

    These rifles shoot better than most shooters that own them. If you get one with a good bore it will serve any purpose a Rem 700 will. Some folks look down their noses at the rifles simply because they are so inexpensive.

    Most of the Pre-war, or Post war guns have a decent finish. The wartime production pressures did not allow nice polishing of the finish, but at the same time, they did not sacrifice quality.

    These rifles served in a military capacity for at least 90 years, making them one of the longest serving military weapon in modern times. They are reliable and tough as an anvil.

    The historical aspect of owning a rifle that is a veteran of the most violent fighting of WWII is another aspect of draw of these rifles. The Soviet Union was always short of rifles, and any rifle made before the end of WWII has a very good possibility of being carried by a soldier in combat.

    As a child of the Cold War, it is also cool to know that these are the weapons that the Soviet Union were going to use to "bury us" with. They were refurbished and stored for WWIII. I gloat a bit, that we ended up with their rifles without firing a shot...
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2012
  9. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I'm not a mosin-nagant fan, but if you are then go for it. No matter what I or anyone else thinks about them, at the end of the day its a functioning rifle that cost about as much as two tanks of gas. You really can't wrong at that price.:)

    I just wish I had gotten a couple of SKS's back when thay were the same price as the Mosins are now!!!!!!:mad:
     
  10. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Pretty much what the folks up there said. The Commies had taken their rifles at the end of WW 2, ran them back thru their arsenals for a rebuild, and tucked them away in their War Stocks. In the past few years, needing cash, they have dumped a few million of them on the market.

    For the price, you get a "factory refurbished rifle", rather idiot proof (or uneducated peasant proof) that will give reasonable accuracy, drop any animal found in North America with the right bullet, has cheap ammo available, and is dirt cheap.

    Frankly, you have a hard time buying a rusty 22 rifle for what these are selling for. If you want want, get one- they WILL eventually go up, and go away.
     
  11. vincent

    vincent New Member

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    Go ahead and get it, you won't be sorry. If you don't like it, it has lots of other uses! :D

    http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinHumor.htm

    Surf around that site too, it's packed with info, just the historical aspect alone is enough of a cool factor for me. IMHO the absolute best VALUE in a rifle out there...
     
  12. Big-Nasty

    Big-Nasty New Member

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    I have always loved the look and design of the Mosin. It is a great peice of Russian history. I also agree that it's one of those rifles where you can't just have 1. I'm looking forward to buying at least 2 more. Another carbine and a regular long Mosin. If there's guns that has been around for a long long time and has been used in many wars and is still being shot today by it's fans then why not give it a shot. One thing I love about this rifle is that the 7.62x54mm round is MEAN. I also think it's cool that the round is still being used today. I was wondering what is up with the Chinese made Mosin's? I saw them the other day on j&gsales.com.
     
  13. msup752

    msup752 New Member

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    My problem is all of the options! Which one to get? My answer seems to be "many because one is not enough". And I should get a Nagant to go with a Mosin as a matching pair! :)

    Since suppressors are now legal n my state, C&R buying was put on hold. With prices sure to climb, it might be time to switch back to C&R. Now I find a dealer that has some pristine, although relatively expensive WW2 K98's!

    Maybe I need to find a second job!
     
  14. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What is up with the Chinese T-53s you are seeing now is this: In the early 1950s the Soviets and the Chinese were good buddies. The Soviets had all of this equipment and spare parts for obsolete bolt action rifles laying around and gave them or sold them to their Communist BFF. They also sent engineers and technicians to help the Chinese get started. In 1953 the Chinese started making the exact copy of the M-1944 but called it the T-53. Who knows what the Chinese were thinking, making these to begin with, the SKS and AK were coming down the pipe soon.

    Other countries got the same deal from the Soviets, some of whom, may have had the rifles and tooling shoved down their throats. Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungaryand Chek....(how ever you spell it) and probably North Korea made the same rifle, only the name changed to protect the innocent.

    That is one draw to collecting these rifles, there are a heap of variations that can be had for little money. It is the working mans collectable today. Who knows about tomorrow, they may go the way of the SKS or Mauser which used to be dirt cheap. In ten years there may be people bragging about only paying $100.00 for these, back in the day......
     
  15. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    The great thing about the M44s and the T53s is most of them haven't had

    a re-arsenal, and were lightly used. You can find beat up ones,

    but with very little difficulty I found two pristine M44s, with all

    matching serial#s.

    IMHO, these are the best of the lot, carbine-sized, all your

    accessories come with the gun, the bayonet is built on.

    If you're a true freak, like me, you can even drill the

    buttstock,(ah, remove the steel cover plate first,skippy)

    to store the cleaning jag, guide and handle.

    Robust, self sufficient, and accurate, with good

    ammunition.

    And whotta muzzle blast! There is mondo fun factor

    here.

    I also use mine when I'm scouting with binoculars, before a big hunt.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2012
  16. Johnny357

    Johnny357 New Member

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    People do turn their noses up at them at the range. It doesn't matter what kind of cool guns I was blasting away with beforehand, the second I take out a Mosin somebody is going to make some stupid comment. I don't get it, I think they are historical, tremendous fun and cheap to shoot.
     
  17. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    So you get it. The folks that feel a need to put the rifle or the shooter down have no clue.
     
  18. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I've bump fired a mosin. I'm just awesome like that.
     
  19. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    So how did you attach the bolt to your long nuts? We know your nick name is long nuts!
     
  20. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    winchester sells a whitebox noncorrosive reloadable 7.62x54r cartridge. couple other large ammo makers put out softpoint hunting ammo in reloadable noncorrosive too. using quality ammo a mosin in a decent shooter's hands will go 1.5 to 2 moa with open sights.