Painting jobs.

Discussion in 'Engraving & Refinishing' started by Zamzow, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. Zamzow

    Zamzow New Member

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    What's the best way and what paint should u use to paint synthetic rifle stocks.
     
  2. paperplatetargets

    paperplatetargets New Member

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    The stock needs treating first as plastic doesn't except paint very well. There's a gas method and a flame method. I wouldn't try either, so send it off if you want it done correctly...OR... If your like me and treat your firearms as tools, Some Dura-Coat or Rust-Oleum for plastic is fine. Roll around in the gravel and use it like it was built for. Scars, scratches, dents and dings are character :)
     

  3. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Do not use the "Fusion" paint for plastic.
    It looks good for a while, but will soon flake off.
    On some plastics it does not "fuse" that well.
     
  4. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Krylon plasti-coat or just plain Krylon will do a good job if you prep & apply correctly-
     
  5. Zamzow

    Zamzow New Member

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    Is the dura-coat paint easy to applicate and do u have to use an air brush to applicate it.
     
  6. Alpha1Victor

    Alpha1Victor New Member

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    I would honestly recommend cerakote for your application. Duracoat isnt a bad product but the cerakote will bond much better.
     
  7. DuraCoater

    DuraCoater New Member

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    Bonding has to do with the prep, not the name on the bottle.

    The main difference between Cerekote and DuraCoat are the way they cure and the materials they consist of.

    Saying one is better than the other is like saying a Glock is better than a 1911.

    One cures via the air and one cures via an oven - both are extremely durable if prepped and cured properly. Cerekote's advantage is if you have ovens big enough, once they bake, they are done. DuraCoat's advantage is the finish has some elastic properties, unlike a ceramic based finish, which basically cracks if it "bends" even a little. Its all preference based.

    The "this one is better" argument only exists because of people who like to latch onto one product and defend is mercilessly. :)

    Obviously I use DuraCoat - and have for years - but I won't put down CereKote or GunKote - DuraCoat is just my preference. But they ALL suck if you don't prep correctly.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2013
  8. Alpha1Victor

    Alpha1Victor New Member

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    You got me there. Thanks for the info.
     
  9. DuraCoater

    DuraCoater New Member

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    You can even get fantastic results out of products like Krylon if you prep properly. The problem with those products is simply that they are not formulated to stand up to a lot of cleaning solvents and so forth that are often used on firearms. :)

    Hell, Ive used my fair share of Rustoleum Hi Temp Grill paint on stuff. haha
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2013
  10. MrTrizzae

    MrTrizzae New Member

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    4 years ago I painted this old model 70, twice. The lesson I learned from the first very unsuccessful paint job ( which started peeling off immediately upon drying) was that as soon as you think you have done a good job of cleaning it, clean it again. After giving it a good scratching up with some 500 grit paper I soaked and wiped and soaked and wiped with acetone. You can't clean it too much. Now, 4 years of dragging it through the woods, mountains and snow the scope is the only thing I've ever had to touch up, and only because I shied away from scuffing it before painting.

    ForumRunner_20130408_135434.jpg



    ForumRunner_20130408_135510.jpg
     
  11. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    as Duracoater said, prep work is the biggest factor in painting a gun stock or anything for that matter. you have to determine what's needed for the particular material you want to paint, whether it be metal or synthetic.

    another thing to consider is the composition of the synthetic stock. some are just cheap plastic and are harder to prep than others.

    and my final wipe-down is done with alcohol right before i apply the first coats of paint. learned that from painting plastic car parts over the years.

    anothr tip. before even scuffing or sanding the stock or metal, wipe it down with brake cleaner, acetone or alcohol first. any waxes, oils or contaminates will be imbedded and can ruin the finish if this isn't done. also when i paint a synthetic stock, i use 3M red scuff pads, and use them wet with water and Dawn dishwahing soap. i then dry them completely and then wipe down with alcohol and then it's ready to paint.

    another tip when painting. use more light coats and allow ample time between coats. more light coats with ample drying time in between are are much better than fewer heavier coats.
     
  12. Nathantc

    Nathantc New Member

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    nothing beats krylon fusion camo and a very porous sponge

    this is how my stock started out,, it came in OD green so i used that for a base color
    [​IMG]

    and a about 30mins with a sponge and some black and khaki and i now have this


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    doing it this way makes it look much more natural and less man made,,, remember camo is suppose to be random and works much better when done so
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2013
  13. DuraCoater

    DuraCoater New Member

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    I like, very impressive!

    Did you do the same thing (Krylon) and use a net with the snake pattern?
     
  14. Nathantc

    Nathantc New Member

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    that was on a wood stock and i use a textured stone type paint for a base coat to make it really rough so that it would not slip in the hands
     
  15. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    a method i use when doing camo paintjobs is to shade the edges, instead of going for hard lines. to me, it looks more random and natural.